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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2009

Iowa State University

Law

False memory

Articles 1 - 1 of 1

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Recalling A Witnessed Event Increases Eyewitness Suggestibility The Reversed Testing Effect, Jason C.K. Chan, Ayanna K. Thomas, John B. Bulevich Jan 2009

Recalling A Witnessed Event Increases Eyewitness Suggestibility The Reversed Testing Effect, Jason C.K. Chan, Ayanna K. Thomas, John B. Bulevich

Psychology Publications

People's later memory of an event can be altered by exposure to misinformation about that event. The typical misinformation paradigm, however, does not include a recall test prior to the introduction of misinformation, contrary to what real-life eyewitnesses encounter when they report to a 911 operator or crime-scene officer. Because retrieval is a powerful memory enhancer (the testing effect), recalling a witnessed event prior to receiving misinformation about it should reduce eyewitness suggestibility. We show, however, that immediate cued recall actually exacerbates the later misinformation effect for both younger and older adults. The reversed testing effect we observed was ...