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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Review Of A Flowering Of Quilts Edited By Patricia Cox Crews, Joe Cunningham Oct 2002

Review Of A Flowering Of Quilts Edited By Patricia Cox Crews, Joe Cunningham

Great Plains Quarterly

A Flowering of Quilts comes to us from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s International Quilt Study Center, created by Robert and Ardis James, who donated their magnificent collection of quilts to the university. The book is the catalogue of a two-year exhibition at the Center called "Fanciful Flowers: Botany and the American Quilt" focusing on the connection between American women's love of floral designs in quilts and their affinity for botany in the nineteenth century.

The book itself is like a great walled garden of flowers. Before you can get to the gorgeous photographs of the fifty-three quilts, you ...


Review Of Teaching Spirits: Understanding Native American Religious Traditions By Joseph Epes Brown With Emily Cousins, Kathleen Danker Oct 2002

Review Of Teaching Spirits: Understanding Native American Religious Traditions By Joseph Epes Brown With Emily Cousins, Kathleen Danker

Great Plains Quarterly

This volume passes on to readers some of the teachings of the late scholar and educator Joseph Epes Brown. In consultation with Brown's wife Elenita Brown and daughter Marina Brown Weatherly, writer and editor Emily Cousins has produced a clear and succinct synthesis of what Brown taught his classes at the University of Montana about Native American concepts of the sacred. She accomplishes this through the complex task of blending some of his class lecture notes, published articles, and conference talks with recollections from his students and quotations from published Native American sources.

Following Brown's example in his ...


Review Of Letters From The Dust Bowl By Caroline Henderson, Brian Q. Cannon Oct 2002

Review Of Letters From The Dust Bowl By Caroline Henderson, Brian Q. Cannon

Great Plains Quarterly

In 1907, Caroline Boa, a thirty-year-old school teacher and graduate of Mount Holyoke College, filed on a quarter section in the Oklahoma Panhandle. The following year she married Will Henderson, a one-time cowboy, well-digger, and would-be rancher. For the next fifty-seven years the couple farmed their homestead, although Caroline also taught school for three years in another community and later spent two years working on a master's degree.

Henderson is best known for her "Letters from the Dust Bowl," published by Atlantic Monthly in 1936, one of dozens of articles she wrote for popular magazines between 1913 and 1937 ...


Review Of Indian Orphanages By Marilyn Irvin Holt, Michael C. Coleman Oct 2002

Review Of Indian Orphanages By Marilyn Irvin Holt, Michael C. Coleman

Great Plains Quarterly

During research on American Indian schooling, I sometimes noticed references to orphan children, yet never pursued the matter. Fortunately, Marilyn Irvin Holt did, and her carefully-researched and moving book is the first comprehensive study of Indian orphanages. Although critical of their failings, Holt comes to a surprisingly positive conclusion. Located on reservations, they "offered a way for youngsters to maintain contact with their tribal groups" and "provided a point of identity for both residents and the larger Indian community." When mounting criticism of institutionalization forced the closure of many orphanages in the twentieth century, tribal people became more vulnerable to ...


Review Of F. P. Grove In Europe And Canada: Translated Lives By Klaus Martens, Irene Gammel Oct 2002

Review Of F. P. Grove In Europe And Canada: Translated Lives By Klaus Martens, Irene Gammel

Great Plains Quarterly

Canada's leading prairie author Frederick Philip Grove (1879-1948) had a predilection for strong and silent heroes: the unforgettable Niels Lindstedt in Settlers of the Marsh (1925), Abe Spalding in Fruits of the Earth (1933), John Elliot in Our Daily Bread (1928). Grove's fictional landscape was a multicultural potpourri of immigrants from Sweden, Iceland, Germany, and Russia with new-world men and women transforming the prairie wilderness into fertile and flourishing settlements. Yet Grove, aka German author and translator Felix Paul Greve, was also a literary con man who led his audience down the garden path in a fictionalized autobiography ...


Review Of Medicine That Walks: Disease, Medicine, And Canadian Plains Native People, 1880-1940 By Maureen K. Lux, R. Wesley Heber Oct 2002

Review Of Medicine That Walks: Disease, Medicine, And Canadian Plains Native People, 1880-1940 By Maureen K. Lux, R. Wesley Heber

Great Plains Quarterly

Medicine That Walks recounts the impact of the federal government's Indian policy on the health and well-being of Canadian Plains Indians. The end of the bison as a staple of life, the treaties with the Crown, and the subsequent removal of Indians from the land, followed by settlement replacement-these form the backdrop for a thesis on historical cause and effect. The thesis is that race-based federal policies resulted in social, physical, and spiritual degradation for Indian people. Lux's account unfolds as a clash of cultures in which Indian traditions and practices struggle to survive the relentless onslaught of ...


Review Of Plain Speaking: Essays On Aboriginal Peoples And The Prairie Edited By Patrick Douaud And Bruce Dawson, L. Brooks Hill Oct 2002

Review Of Plain Speaking: Essays On Aboriginal Peoples And The Prairie Edited By Patrick Douaud And Bruce Dawson, L. Brooks Hill

Great Plains Quarterly

Primarily derived from a March 2001 conference held in Regina, Saskatchewan, these essays present diverse perspectives on various connections between First Nations and Metis peoples and the Canadian Plains. Designed to create a more holistic perspective, the conference and this companion book used a wide variety of presentational formats to capture the diversity of past and present connections between Aboriginal Peoples and the prairies. The twelve articles range from traditional academic reports to autobiographical commentaries, photo essays, and transcribed interviews from an Elders' roundtable.

Essential to this collection is the confrontation of modernism with traditionalism. In his article Neal McLeod ...


Review Of General William S. Harney: Prince Of Dragoons By George Rollie Adams, Randy Kane Oct 2002

Review Of General William S. Harney: Prince Of Dragoons By George Rollie Adams, Randy Kane

Great Plains Quarterly

The foremost army office! (next to Winfield Scott) from the end of the War of 1812 to the beginning of the Civil War, William S. Harney experienced the entire spectrum of military activity during the period. More than anything else, he was an army officer of the Indian frontier, and it was on the frontier opposing Indians that he made a name for himself.

Harney was tall, powerful, and athletic as well as volatile, profane, and violent. This combination tended to bring him to the fore wherever he was stationed. He was at his best during active command in the ...


Review Of Rebirth Of The Blackfeet Nation, 1912-1954 By Paul C. Rosier, Darrell Robes Kipp Oct 2002

Review Of Rebirth Of The Blackfeet Nation, 1912-1954 By Paul C. Rosier, Darrell Robes Kipp

Great Plains Quarterly

As a Blackfeet tribal member researching my tribe for over twenty-five years through the medium of its language, I read Paul Rosier's book with trepidation because accurate accounting is not a hallmark of most historical analysis done on the tribe. Too often I detect research flaws based on notions contrary to our oral tradition, and I marvel at the distorted interpretations. Rosier's book is excruciatingly revealing, honest, and important. Not just to me, despite my hardened edge, but for the uninformed reader as well. The chronicle is powerfully laced with pages of stark reality, and wanton subterfuge. One ...


Review Of The Woman Who Watches Over The World: A Native Memoir By Linda Hogan, Diane Quantic Oct 2002

Review Of The Woman Who Watches Over The World: A Native Memoir By Linda Hogan, Diane Quantic

Great Plains Quarterly

Linda Hogan's memoir is centered in stories, beginning with the story of the book's title. In a museum shop Hogan bought a clay woman, "her stomach attached to an orange globe earth," that she had mailed to her home. The figurine arrived with broken legs and, Hogan reports, "she began to fall apart in other ways." Like the clay woman, Hogan has fallen apart in many ways, yet she is also watching over her own world and, by association, the wider world of those who share her heritage, her experiences, or her geography.

Hogan comments, "I sat down ...


Review Of I Hear The Train: Reflections, Inventions, Refractions By Louis Owens, Lee Schweninger Oct 2002

Review Of I Hear The Train: Reflections, Inventions, Refractions By Louis Owens, Lee Schweninger

Great Plains Quarterly

In I Hear the Train, novelist and scholar Louis Owens combines memoir, fiction, and criticism; stories, he calls them, written in an effort "to make sense of the otherwise uninhabitable world we must, of necessity, inhabit." He makes that sense, in large measure, by writing about himself and the importance of family. The "Reflections" are memoirs in which the author recalls his own struggles with inhabiting the world, recounting adolescence and young-adult experiences and describing having found and spent three days with his brother, a Vietnam vet, whom he had neither seen nor heard from in twenty-five years. After the ...


Review Of Mavericks: An Incorrigible History Of Alberta By Aritha Van Herk, Donald B. Smith Oct 2002

Review Of Mavericks: An Incorrigible History Of Alberta By Aritha Van Herk, Donald B. Smith

Great Plains Quarterly

Aritha van Herk's well-written and fast paced Mavericks provides an excellent introduction to Alberta. Served up without footnotes, Mavericks is not history, at least in the academic sense. What Aritha van Herk, a professor of English at the University of Calgary, provides instead is a fascinating personal view of Alberta's past. It contains valuable insights into how many Albertans view themselves and describes particularly well many Albertans' views about their relationship with the rest of Canada.

The first chapter, "Aggravating, Awful, Awkward, Awesome Alberta," is all about the Albertan attitude. What propels the book, what glues it together ...


Migration Of The Great Plains An Introduction, Charles A. Braithwaite Oct 2002

Migration Of The Great Plains An Introduction, Charles A. Braithwaite

Great Plains Quarterly

The 26th annual Center for Great Plains Studies symposium, "Great Plains Migrations," held at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 7 -9 May 2002, was innovative in its interdisciplinary concept and content. The co-chairs of the symposium, Mary Liz Jameson, Research Assistant Professor of Entomology and Museum, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and David Wishart, Professor of Geography, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, brought together scholars from the humanities, social sciences, and biological sciences to examine migration in all its dimensions-from historical and contemporary human migrations to migrations of flora and fauna. The concept of migration is central to the development and dynamics of the Great ...


A Longitudinal Approach To Great Plains Migration, John C. Hudson Oct 2002

A Longitudinal Approach To Great Plains Migration, John C. Hudson

Great Plains Quarterly

Students of population and regional studies are familiar with the demographic "accounting" equation,

Population t+x = Population t + Births x

-Deaths x + Immigration x

- Emigration x

In other words, the size of the population at time t + x is equal to the population at time t plus the births, minus the deaths, plus the immigrants, minus the emigrants, during the interval of time x. This simple formula can be used to derive a variety of rates and statistics describing population change. The equation's main application is to describe short-term change in a population in terms of its various components ...


Piecing Together The Ponca Past Reconstructing Degiha Migrations To The Great Plains, Beth R. Ritter Oct 2002

Piecing Together The Ponca Past Reconstructing Degiha Migrations To The Great Plains, Beth R. Ritter

Great Plains Quarterly

The twenty-first century presents opportunities, as well as limitations, for the American Indian Nations of the Great Plains. Opportunities include enhanced economic development activities (e.g., casino gambling, telecommunications, and high-tech industries) and innovative tribal programming such as language immersion programs made possible through enhanced self-governance initiatives. Limitations include familiar scripts that perpetually threaten tribal sovereignty and chronically underfunded annual appropriations for Native American health, housing, and social service programs.

The Ponca Tribe of Nebraska, terminated in 1965 and restored to federally recognized status in 1990,1 embraces these challenges by exploring the limits of self-governance, economic development opportunities, and ...


Drawn By The Bison Late Prehistoric Native Migration Into The Central Plains, Lauren W. Ritterbush Oct 2002

Drawn By The Bison Late Prehistoric Native Migration Into The Central Plains, Lauren W. Ritterbush

Great Plains Quarterly

Popular images of the Great Plains frequently portray horse-mounted Indians engaged in dramatic bison hunts. The importance of these hunts is emphasized by the oft-mentioned dependence of the Plains Indians on bison. This animal served as a source of not only food but also materials for shelter, clothing, containers, and many other necessities of life. Pursuit of the vast bison herds (combined with the needs of the Indians' horses for pasturage) affected human patterns of subsistence, mobility, and settlement. The Lakota and Cheyenne, for instance, are described as relying heavily on bison meat for food and living a nomadic lifestyle ...


Review Of Working The Garden: American Writers And The Industrialization Of Agriculture By William Conlogue, Mary Paniccia-Carden Oct 2002

Review Of Working The Garden: American Writers And The Industrialization Of Agriculture By William Conlogue, Mary Paniccia-Carden

Great Plains Quarterly

In Working the Garden William Conlogue critiques readings of American literature dependent on pastoral assumptions, proposing instead a georgic perspective that would examine "the history of the intersections we have made among human work, human imagination, and the physical environment." While he takes a somewhat reductive view of previous critical approaches and of American applications of pastoral modes, his demonstration of the ways in which georgic questions alter our understanding of our literature promises to be of significant importance to the study of Great Plains literature.

The georgic, Conlogue explains, "explores the lived landscapes of rural experience" where "our ambiguous ...


Review Of Orphan Trains: The Story Of Charles Loring Brace And The Children He Saved And Failed By Stephen O' Connor, Marilyn Irvin Holt Oct 2002

Review Of Orphan Trains: The Story Of Charles Loring Brace And The Children He Saved And Failed By Stephen O' Connor, Marilyn Irvin Holt

Great Plains Quarterly

Charles Loring Brace, who began working among the poor as a city missionary and became the force behind the New York Children's Aid Society (CAS), is best remembered as the architect of the orphan trains, a placement program that sent thousands of orphaned, destitute, and abandoned children to new homes, including those in the Plains states. This biography of Brace places him within the context of his times and renders a more extensive view of the man and his beliefs than found in other publications. The volume offers insights into CAS programs for the poor in New York City ...


Title And Contents- Fall 2002 Oct 2002

Title And Contents- Fall 2002

Great Plains Quarterly

Great Plains Quarterly

Volume 22/ Number 4 / Fall 2002

Contents

MIGRATION OF THE GREAT PLAINS: AN INTRODUCTION Charles A. Braithwaite

A LONGITUDINAL APPROACH TO GREAT PLAINS MIGRATION John C. Hudson

DRAWN BY THE BISON: LATE PREHISTORIC NATIVE MIGRATION INTO THE CENTRAL PLAINS Lauren W. Ritterbush

PIECING TOGETHER THE PONCA PAST: RECONSTRUCTING DEGIHA MIGRATONS TO THE GREAT PLAINS Beth R. Ritter

Book Reviews

Notes And News

Patrick Douaud and Bruce Dawson, eds. Plain Speaking: Essays on Aboriginal Peoples and the Prairie By L. BROOKS HILL

George Rollie Adams General William S. Harney: Prince of Dragoons By RANDY KANE

Marilyn Irvin Holt ...


Review Of The Plains Indian Photographs Of Edward S. Curtis By Edward S. Curtis, Clara Sue Kidwell Jul 2002

Review Of The Plains Indian Photographs Of Edward S. Curtis By Edward S. Curtis, Clara Sue Kidwell

Great Plains Quarterly

This selection of Edward Curtis photographs is accompanied by three scholarly discussions of various aspects of his work. Martha Sandweiss places him in a historical context by considering both the development of his photographic techniques and the work of other photographers of his time (early twentieth century). Curtis was the most prominent of a group of individuals who made photography a popular and commercial medium. Mick Gidley emphasizes the fact that Curtis did not work alone; he employed both photographic and ethnographic assistants in relatively large numbers. Financed largely by J. Pierpont Morgan, Curtis and his assistants traveled extensively, but ...


Review Of Mackenzie King And The Prairie West By Robert A. Wardhaugh, Allen Mills Jul 2002

Review Of Mackenzie King And The Prairie West By Robert A. Wardhaugh, Allen Mills

Great Plains Quarterly

William Lyon Mackenzie King was prime minister of Canada almost continuously between 1921 and his retirement in1948. The main exception was the Conservative government of R. B. Bennett between 1930 and 1935. Yet at the very same time, in all sorts of ways, the Prairie West was, apparently, not part of this victorious parade. The Prairie West instead chose to go a-whoring after strange, sectional, political gods of its own invention: first the Progressive farmers movement after 1921; then Social Credit after 1935; and finally the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation, which formed, if we are to believe Seymour Martin Lipset, the ...


Review Of Finding The West: Explorations With Lewis And Clark By James P. Ronda, Greg O'Brien Jul 2002

Review Of Finding The West: Explorations With Lewis And Clark By James P. Ronda, Greg O'Brien

Great Plains Quarterly

Amid the hype over the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark expedition, University of Tulsa history professor James Ronda has written a work of eminent common sense that provides an antidote to the myth-making surrounding the journey of the Corps of Discovery. A prolific scholar of the West and the Lewis and Clark expedition, Ronda here presents seven "stories" and a map essay examining the wider context, the cultural and political assumptions, and the impact of the trek. "Such a reconsideration," Ronda insists, "might reveal not one voyage but many, not one band of explorers but whole congregations of the ...


Title And Contents- Summer 2002 Jul 2002

Title And Contents- Summer 2002

Great Plains Quarterly

Great Plains Quarterly

Volume 22/ Number 3 / Summer 2002

CONTENTS

CONGRESSMAN USHER BURDICK OF NORTH DAKOTA AND THE "UNGODLY MENACE": ANTI-UNITED NATIONS RHETORIC, 1950-1958 163 Bernard Lemelin

"PRIVATE" LIVES AND "PUBLIC" WRITING: RHETORICAL PRACTICES OF WESTERN NEBRASKA WOMEN Charlotte Hogg

"SHE HAD NEVER HUMBLED HERSELF": ALEXANDRA BERGSON AND MARIE SHABATA AS THE "REAL" PIONEERS OF O PIONEERS! Douglas W. Werden

REVIEW ESSAY: INDIANS AND ANTHROPOLOGISTS David Wishart A review of Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 13. Plains.

Book Reviews

Joseph Epes Brown with Emily Cousins Teaching Spirits: Understanding Native American Religious Traditions By KATHLEEN DANKER

James P. Ronda Finding ...


Review Of Quilting Lessons: Notes From The Scrap Bag Of A Writer And Quilter By Janet Catherine Berlo, Laurel Horton Jul 2002

Review Of Quilting Lessons: Notes From The Scrap Bag Of A Writer And Quilter By Janet Catherine Berlo, Laurel Horton

Great Plains Quarterly

This series of personal essays documents the author's reflections over a two-year period in which she, an otherwise successful and prolific scholar and writer, found herself in a state of professional paralysis. Unable to complete a major manuscript on Native American women artists, Berlo submersed herself in her own creative expression, making quilts. "Eleven months were almost exclusively nonverbal and nonlinear, filled with color. Yet they also were filled with confusion over the loss of my scholarly work. For during the months that the quilter emerged, the scholar disappeared. From being a productive writer and researcher I was transformed-seemingly ...


Review Of Governmentality And The Mastery Of Territory In Nineteenth-Century America By Matthew G. Hannah, Christine Pappas Jul 2002

Review Of Governmentality And The Mastery Of Territory In Nineteenth-Century America By Matthew G. Hannah, Christine Pappas

Great Plains Quarterly

This contribution to historical geography maps the idea of governmentality in the nineteenth- century United States through the career of Frances Walker, director of the 1870 and 1880 Census, social commentator, and educator. Drawing on Foucault, Hannah explores Walker's life and work, pinpointing the essential but subtle "moments" in the emergence of governmentality.

Walker's work with the national Census was pivotal, Hannah claims, to increasing governmental control of America's people since it was one of the ways to "internally colonize" a territory. Governmentality, in short, is the "logic of social regulation that consistently blends the principles of ...


Review Of Cold Snap As Yearning By Robert Vivian, Jonathan Ritz Jul 2002

Review Of Cold Snap As Yearning By Robert Vivian, Jonathan Ritz

Great Plains Quarterly

In this collection of personal essays, Robert Vivian offers a series of vivid, intensely reflective, and soul-stirring renderings of the lives and landscapes of the Great Plains. He explores a broad range of topics, from the dynamics of grief to the existential ephemera of modern existence, with wonderful literary inventiveness, quilting together seemingly disparate anecdotes, images, and reflections into a more complex whole. Many of his subjects here are closely personal, though even in the essays that provide an intimate glimpse into his own life Vivian's gaze inevitably turns outward, to the places and people around him; the book ...


Review Of Ed Ruscha By Neal Benezra And Kerry Brougher, With A Contribution By Phyllis Rosenzweig, Daniel A. Siedell Jul 2002

Review Of Ed Ruscha By Neal Benezra And Kerry Brougher, With A Contribution By Phyllis Rosenzweig, Daniel A. Siedell

Great Plains Quarterly

This book, intended to accompany an international traveling retrospective exhibition, is a welcome contribution to understanding Ed Ruscha's important but underappreciated role in the complex and diverse history of postwar American art. Although he has long been regarded as one of the "important" contemporary artists who came to aesthetic maturity in the mid-1960s, why he is important has not been sufficiently demonstrated. This publication points the way.

The number and quality of reproductions of Rusch a's work are the book's most important contribution. The images alone demonstrate the sheer diversity and energy of Ruscha's aesthetic vocabulary ...


Review Of Dissent In Wichita: The Civil Rights Movement In The Midwest, 1954-72 By Gretchen Cassel Eick, Timothy N. Thurber Jul 2002

Review Of Dissent In Wichita: The Civil Rights Movement In The Midwest, 1954-72 By Gretchen Cassel Eick, Timothy N. Thurber

Great Plains Quarterly

Community studies of the modern civil rights movement have tended to focus on the South or the Northeast, but Gretchen Eick makes a convincing case that important developments, long ignored by most scholars, were happening in the Midwest too.

Eick surveys a broad range of topics, including education, employment, housing, and relations between the national and local NAACP. Much of the story in Wichita resembles that in other parts of the nation. Real estate agents thwarted efforts at neighborhood integration. Local officials dragged their heels on school integration until pressure from the federal government forced change. The aircraft industry, the ...


"Private" Lives And "Public" Writing Rhetorical Practices Of Western Nebraska Women, Charlotte Hogg Jul 2002

"Private" Lives And "Public" Writing Rhetorical Practices Of Western Nebraska Women, Charlotte Hogg

Great Plains Quarterly

The library in the western Nebraska town of Paxton (population approximately 500) is small, and my grandmother was president of the library board for many years. When I was younger, I learned about the history of the library from her research and writing published in the local county newspaper. In write-ups for both the library's twenty-fifth and fiftieth anniversaries, she described how women "were found to be very handy with hammer and saw" when starting the library.1 I saw my grandma frequently and had been hearing her stories for years, but here were her words in a newspaper ...


Congressman Usher Burdick Of North Dakota And The "Ungodly Menace" Anti-United Nations Rhetoric, 1950-1958, Bernard Lemelin Jul 2002

Congressman Usher Burdick Of North Dakota And The "Ungodly Menace" Anti-United Nations Rhetoric, 1950-1958, Bernard Lemelin

Great Plains Quarterly

In the rare studies dealing with American post-World War II isolationism, the state of North Dakota always holds a special place, as it has acquired the reputation of having been "the nation's most isolationist state during [the] postwar decade."1 To a large extent, this reputation can be ascribed to the attitude of some of its prominent members on Capitol Hill, such as Senators William Langer, who voted against the United Nations Charter in 1945, and his colleague Milton Young, an opponent of the North Atlantic Treaty in 1949.2 Representative Usher Burdick, who sat between 1949 and 1959 ...