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1997

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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Ddasaccident132, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Dec 1997

Ddasaccident132, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators determined that the victim was investigating a reading in a pile of soil deposited by the back-hoe when the mine went off. The investigators reported that the victim claimed to have been using a bayonet but that his lack of injury made them think this unlikely.


Ddasaccident134, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Dec 1997

Ddasaccident134, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators determined that Victim No.1 was investigating a pile of spoil deposited by the back-hoe when he got a continuous detector reading and started excavating with a long handled shovel. He detonated a mine. The mine was identified as a PMN (by "found fragments").


Ddasaccident020, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Dec 1997

Ddasaccident020, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

When the deminer came alongside the first mine, he located another, and called the victim again. The victim decided to prepare the mines for destruction, took the deminer's "spade" and sent him away. When the deminer reached the safe area the detonation occurred at 09:55.


Ddasaccident135, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Dec 1997

Ddasaccident135, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators decided that the victim found a detector reading, marked it, and started to excavate with a pick – contravening a UN MAC directive to stop using a pick for excavation. The mine was identified as a PMN (from "found fragments").


Ddasaccident136, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Dec 1997

Ddasaccident136, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

No investigation on behalf of the UN MAC was made available. An initial letter informing the UN MAC of the accident was found. The following summarises its content.


Ddasaccident220, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Dec 1997

Ddasaccident220, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators concluded that the accident was "preventable". The mine should have been found during excavation but the appropriate SOPs were not being used. Supervision was inadequate and the control of movement in cleared areas was not in accordance with SOPs.


Ddasaccident166, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Nov 1997

Ddasaccident166, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The victim's partner placed a start stick about 25cm away from the marked edge of the safe lane from which they were advancing, and a second stick half a meter in front of that (so marking the working area). The victim checked his detector, then started to sweep the first 50cm in front of the start stick. This took about one minute. On finding the area clear he bent down to pick up the start stick and moved it forward, taking a step forward as he did so. He stepped on a mine that had been in front of ...


Ddasaccident139, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Nov 1997

Ddasaccident139, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators checked the Team's detectors and found five to be not "in proper working condition". The victim used one of these detectors. At the end of the working day the victim was taking his equipment to the store and either stepped into an uncleared area or stepped on a missed mine (due to the faulty detectors).


Ddasaccident009, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Nov 1997

Ddasaccident009, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The victim had been a deminer for seven years. It was ten days since he had last attended a revision course, and two days since he was last on leave. The ground being cleared was described as the medium-hard bed of a dry lake. The victim's bayonet was destroyed and the visor damaged. The investigators claimed to have found fragments to confirm that the mine involved was a PMN.


Ddasaccident139, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Nov 1997

Ddasaccident139, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators concluded that the victim was feeling unwell and had requested leave, so he might not have been concentrating when he stepped into an uncleared area. He might also have stepped on a missed mine.


Ddasaccident024, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Nov 1997

Ddasaccident024, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

On the day of the accident the victim started work at 07:00 clearing "a line to the spot were they earlier had found the POMZ and started 10 metres from the spot". His lane was one metre wide and required the cutting of foliage with a machete before clearing. When he was about a metre from the spot a detonator (MUV-2) exploded (at 07:30). "He got small stones in the face and head which gave him small wounds".


Ddasaccident116, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Nov 1997

Ddasaccident116, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The accident occurred at 11:15 in an area that was undulating and steep with dry earth and rock. The victim was investigating a detector reading with a prodder when the mine exploded. He suffered minor blast injuries to his chin and small fragment injuries to his right hand, his right thigh and knee joint. His helmet and visor took most of the blast. The victim was blown back and rolled several metres down a slope. He was evacuated, with two deminers of the same blood group, to the "Emergency" Hospital.


Ddasaccident006, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Nov 1997

Ddasaccident006, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The team started work at 07:30 and at 09:30 it started to rain so they stopped work. The rain was light but it prevented the deminers from seeing through their visors until 10:55 when they started work again. At 11:10 the victim found a mine and was starting to mark it. He turned to his No.2 to request some pickets and as he did so he slipped and fell backwards onto the mine. The victim was holding his detector at the time. He was thrown into a mined area so a safe lane was cleared ...


Ddasaccident221, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Nov 1997

Ddasaccident221, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators decided that Victim No.1 probably believed the area was safe because it had been checked by the dog. They were "unable to draw any meaningful conclusions about the dog's performance on that day". They felt that Victim No.1 was "not sufficiently systematic" in his detector search.


Ddasaccident023, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Nov 1997

Ddasaccident023, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The team began work at 05:45. One dog was found unfit for work and returned to kennels (a tick bite in the eye was the cause). The other dog passed the routine 10 minute pre-work test and started work at around 06:30. Work continued (with two rests) until 09:00 when the dog was given another routine test. The victim entered the cleared area to complete his survey report and at 09:05 and stepped on a mine. He was evacuated to hospital in Maputo and arrived at 10:24. His injuries were severe trauma to left leg ...


Ddasaccident053, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Nov 1997

Ddasaccident053, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The victim began work at 07:00 and had worked with a ten minute break each hour until 12:34 when the accident occurred. The method involved excavating "to a depth of 20cm using a sideways sweeping motion" with the hoe [pick]. He had found one mine that morning and as he worked forward he encountered a rock ledge at only 5cm depth. He uncovered the rock for three metres until the ledge ended. At the edge of the rock was a tree root that the deminer tried to cut with the hoe. Either the movement of the tree root ...


Ddasaccident140, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Oct 1997

Ddasaccident140, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators decided that the victim was working with the detector and got a reading. He placed one mark and squatted to prod without wearing his helmet correctly. His bayonet was “destroyed” in the accident.


Ddasaccident055, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Oct 1997

Ddasaccident055, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators visited the site on 4th November 1997 and found the deminers clearing a 2m wide verge on both sides of the road. They observed that the deminers were clearing without using marking sticks and at a distance of only 6 metres apart. The victim and his partner began work at 07:30. By 08.50 they had cleared 502 metres. Both men wore frag-jackets, helmet and visor. The victim was clearing by using his prodder. He was called to help his Section Leader remove grass from a large pothole in the road. As he returned at 08:50 ...


Ddasaccident025, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Oct 1997

Ddasaccident025, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

There was a safe lane at the bottom of the embankment and deminers were working uphill from it. The victim had been working for fifteen minutes when he decided to clear a wire that was in front of his cleared area. He checked with the Schiebel detector and picked up a reading that he thought was the wire, so ignored it. He entered the uncleared area, cut the wire, and slipped back down the embankment.


Ddasaccident141, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Oct 1997

Ddasaccident141, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators determined that the victim had got a detector reading, marked it and then started to excavate using a shovel and without wearing his helmet and visor. They said that during the investigation people pretended the victim has been marking the cleared area when the accident occurred but in the original accident report it was mentioned that the accident occurred during prodding – the investigators decided that "this is their pretext to confuse investigation".


Ddasaccident143, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Oct 1997

Ddasaccident143, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators determined that a dog had indicated a reading and Victim No.1 used his detector at the site and got two readings 35cm apart. He marked one of the indications and uncovered a MK 7 AT mine. Thinking that the second reading must be a fragment, he began investigating it carelessly and detonated the mine. His bayonet was "lost".


Ddasaccident222, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Oct 1997

Ddasaccident222, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators concluded that the demining group had insufficient "lead-time" to properly plan the task, that the base-line was not marked and marking of cleared areas was inadequate and that the mine was below the depth that prodding and excavation would normally find it.


Ddasaccident223, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Oct 1997

Ddasaccident223, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators found no fault with the company's SOPs but said that "insufficient planning and lead-time was allowed for the clearance team to be prepared…". They thought that the "contractual pressure created an atmosphere of unnecessary urgency", that communications between the demining company and the [QA] were inadequate and that the parties involved were all interpreting the contract differently.


Ddasaccident145, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Oct 1997

Ddasaccident145, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators found that "the ground was suitable for prodding in a prone position, but the victim was performing prodding in the squatting position. During prodding he failed to maintain the correct prodding angle and applied excessive pressure on the mine…it is presumed that the locator of the victim might not have been working properly…" The deminer's visor and glove were damaged, and his bayonet was reported to have been "lost".


Ddasaccident146, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Sep 1997

Ddasaccident146, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators said that, "When the deminer registered a reading on the detector, he marked the reading and then started prodding in half prone/squatting position. After a few minutes prodding he approached the second marker and the mine went off".


Ddasaccident147, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Sep 1997

Ddasaccident147, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators determined that the accident occurred when the deminer used only one marking stone to mark a detector signal, then prodded in a squatting position which "failed him to maintain the correct prodding angle". It is suggested that he was careless because he thought he had detected a fragment (having detected many fragments immediately beforehand).


Ddasaccident008, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Sep 1997

Ddasaccident008, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

At 10:30 the victim was walking through the area to reach the rest area when he stood on a mine, thought to be a PMN buried to a depth of about 5cm. The victim suffered a below knee amputation to his left leg and minor injuries to both arms and legs.


Ddasaccident224, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Sep 1997

Ddasaccident224, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The team were finishing their shift for the day and the victim was asked to mark the edge of the area that had been surveyed that day. As he walked to that point he trod on an undetected PMA-3. The victim was later told that the mine had been laid too deep for the detectors to locate. The victim was wearing military boots, leggings, a frag-jacket, and a helmet & visor.


Ddasaccident138, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Sep 1997

Ddasaccident138, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The accident area was undulating and steep with dry earth and rock. The team had found "many" PMNs in the area prior to the accident. The deminer was clearing a safe-lane and was using a prodder to inspect a reading when a PMN exploded at 11:20. He suffered minor blast injuries to his neck and chin as well as small injuries to both hands in the dorsal area and his right shoulder. His visor and helmet took most of the blast. The victim walked out of the accident area and was taken to the Emergency hospital in Sulymania along ...


Ddasaccident148, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database Sep 1997

Ddasaccident148, Humanitarian Demining Accident And Incident Database

Global CWD Repository

The investigators determined that Victim No.1 was scratching a mark to show the end of the breaching land outside the area actually cleared (he should have left a 50cm safety margin the other way) when his bayonet pulled the tripwire attached to the mine. The mine was three metres away from the deminer when it was initiated. They thought that Victim No 2 did not maintain the proper safety distance and so was hit by some fragments.