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1997

Great Plains Quarterly

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Title And Contents- Summer/Fall 1997 Jul 1997

Title And Contents- Summer/Fall 1997

Great Plains Quarterly

GREAT PLAINS Quarterly

Summer/Fall 1997 Volume 17 Number 3/4

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION Frances W. Kaye

MAPPING THE MARIAS: THE INTERFACE OF NATIVE AND SCIENTIFIC CARTOGRAPHIES Barbara Belyea

THE SACRED BLACK HILLS: AN ETHNOHISTORICAL REVIEW Linea Sundstrom

THE THATCHER GOVERNMENT IN SASKATCHEWAN AND THE REVIVAL OF METIS NATIONALISM, 1964-71 James M. Pitsula

FLOODING THE MISSOURI VALLEY: THE POLITICS OF DAM SITE SELECTION AND DESIGN Robert Kelley Schneiders

REVIEW ESSAY: IN THE SERVICE OF EMPIRE Ward Churchill

A review of The Turn to the Native: Studies in Criticism and Culture by Arnold Krupat

BOOK REVIEWS

On Behalf of the Wolf and ...


Notes And News- Summer/Fall 1997 Jul 1997

Notes And News- Summer/Fall 1997

Great Plains Quarterly

Notes and News

GREAT PLAINS QUARTERLY WINS AWARD

CENTER FOR GREAT PLAINS STUDIES SYMPOSIA

CALLS FOR PAPERS

HARVARD UNIVERSITY NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAM


Mapping The Marias The Interface Of Native And Scientific Cartographies, Barbara Belyea Jul 1997

Mapping The Marias The Interface Of Native And Scientific Cartographies, Barbara Belyea

Great Plains Quarterly

In early June 1805, as they traveled up the Missouri toward the continental divide, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark came to a fork where two rivers of apparently comparable width and force flowed together. The captains paused at this junction, unable to decide which river was the "main stream" of the Missouri and which was the tributary. They were determined to fulfill Thomas Jefferson's instructions as exactly as possible: "to explore the Missouri river, & such principal stream of it, as, by it's course and communication with the waters of the Pacific ocean ... may offer the most direct & practicable ...


Review Of On Behalf Of The Wolf And The First Peoples By Joseph Marshall Iii, Ellen Dubas Jul 1997

Review Of On Behalf Of The Wolf And The First Peoples By Joseph Marshall Iii, Ellen Dubas

Great Plains Quarterly

Much of what has been written about Native Americans has been written by Euro-Americans. It is very important that the peoples write about aspects of their culture that they consider to be most important about themselves. On Behalf of the Wolf and the First Peoples by Joseph Marshall III is, I hope, the first of many such works.

In his book Marshall demonstrates a relationship between Native Americans and the wolf. That humans are a part of nature and not in control of nature is an idea that has begun to resonate throughout Anglo culture in the form of the ...


Review Of Voices Of The Plains Cree By Edward Ahenakew, Ann Leger-Anderson, Brian Mlazgar Jul 1997

Review Of Voices Of The Plains Cree By Edward Ahenakew, Ann Leger-Anderson, Brian Mlazgar

Great Plains Quarterly

RESPONSE TO REVIEW

Jennifer S. H. Brown reviewed Edward Ahenakew's Voices of the Plains Cree (reprinted Regina: Canadian Plains Research Center) in the Winter 1997 issue of Great Plains Quarterly (volume 17, number 1). Because we believe her review misrepresents the book, however, we would like to explain why the Canadian Plains Research Center Publication Board made the choices that it did regarding its decision to reprint this volume.

The board considered the sorts of issues raised by Brown. Extensive discussion occurred, and the board concurred that a reissue of the original Voices of the Plains Cree was preferable ...


Review Of Black Elk And Flaming Rainbow; Personal Memories Of The Lakota Holy Man And John Neihardt, Julian Rice Jul 1997

Review Of Black Elk And Flaming Rainbow; Personal Memories Of The Lakota Holy Man And John Neihardt, Julian Rice

Great Plains Quarterly

In 1931 fourteen year-old Hilda Neihardt accompanied her father and her sister Enid to the Pine Ridge Reservation for the interviews that became Black Elk Speaks. Now, sixty-four years later, she provides a "human-interest narrative" of previously unpublished anecdotes from that historically significant visit, as well as pointed revelations intended to correct "serious misunderstandings" of several unnamed but identifiable interpreters.

Some of the descriptions accurately reflect racial attitudes and stereotypes of 1931. One of the elderly witnesses to Black Elk's narrative, Chase-in-the-Morning, "was slim, hardened, and strongly built .... His aquiline face, twinkling eyes, and long hair completed for us ...


Review Of The Turn To The Native: Studies In Criticism And Culture By Arnold Krupat, Ward Churchill Jul 1997

Review Of The Turn To The Native: Studies In Criticism And Culture By Arnold Krupat, Ward Churchill

Great Plains Quarterly

In the final essay of his most recent book, The Turn to the Native: Studies in Criticism and Culture, self-styled "ethnocritic" Arnold Krupat wonders aloud whether, through his interpretive activities, he hasn't become a "leftist colonizer" of the very sort critiqued so scathingly by Tunisian revolutionary theorist Albert Memmi more than three decades ago (p. 126). This worthy query, seemingly posed mainly as a rhetorical device allowing its author to absolve himself of the charge-he shortly concludes that simply by being "someone who reads and writes about Native American literature" he has made himself "useful without vanity" and is ...


Index- Summer/Fall 1997 Jul 1997

Index- Summer/Fall 1997

Great Plains Quarterly

Index (7 pages)

Summer/Fall 1997


Introduction- Summer/Fall 1997, Frances W. Kaye Jul 1997

Introduction- Summer/Fall 1997, Frances W. Kaye

Great Plains Quarterly

This special double issue of Great Plains Quarterly has been a long time in the making. Unlike the yearly special issues that showcase papers from our annual symposia, this number of the Quarterly contains four articles submitted at various times, revised and expanded, and collected together. All deal with EuroNorth Americans' misperceptions of indigenous peoples and the consequences of those misperceptions for all peoples of the Great Plains.

In "The Sacred Black Hills," Linea Sundstrom painstakingly contradicts the view many researchers have proposed that Cheyenne and Lakota beliefs and oral traditions about the sacredness of the Black Hills had been ...


The Thatcher Government In Saskatchewan And The Revival Of Metis Nationalism, 1964-71, James M. Pitsula Jul 1997

The Thatcher Government In Saskatchewan And The Revival Of Metis Nationalism, 1964-71, James M. Pitsula

Great Plains Quarterly

The 1960s was a significant decade in the history of the relationship between the government of Saskatchewan and Aboriginal peoples. Premier Ross Thatcher, who led the Liberal party to victory in the April 1964 provincial election, had a strong personal interest in the plight of Indians and Metis, and his government undertook a number of initiatives intended to improve their living conditions. At the same time, Indians and Metis themselves experienced a political awakening and became more assertive. One might have expected many positive achievements flowing from this combination of a well-intentioned government and an energized Aboriginal community. In fact ...


Flooding The Missouri Valley The Politics Of Dam Site Selection And Design, Robert Kelley Schneiders Jul 1997

Flooding The Missouri Valley The Politics Of Dam Site Selection And Design, Robert Kelley Schneiders

Great Plains Quarterly

In December 1944 the United States Congress passed a Rivers and Harbors Bill that authorized the construction of the Pick-Sloan plan for Missouri River development. From 1946 to 1966, the United States Army Corps of Engineers, with the assistance of private contractors, implemented much of that plan in the Missouri River Valley. In that twenty-year period, five of the world's largest earthen dams were built across the main-stem of the Missouri River in North and South Dakota. The size of these structures defies the imagination. Fort Randall Dam in southeast South Dakota is 160 feet high and 10,700 ...


The Sacred Black Hills An Ethnohistorical Review, Linea Sundstrom Jul 1997

The Sacred Black Hills An Ethnohistorical Review, Linea Sundstrom

Great Plains Quarterly

The Black Hills area is widely recognized as sacred in the context of traditional Lakota and Cheyenne belief systems. Questions arise, however, regarding the authenticity and historical depth of these beliefs.1 Some researchers assert that the concept of the sacred Black Hills is little more than a twentieth century scheme to promote tourism or part of a legal strategy to gain the return of Black Hills lands to Lakota and Cheyenne tribal governments.2 While many Lakotas and Cheyennes today express a strong spiritual link to the Black Hills,3 some historians have questioned whether today's beliefs about ...


Review Of The Frontier In American Culture: An Exhibition At The Newberry Library, August 26,1994- January 7,1995 Essays By Richard White And Patricia Nelson Limerick, Katherine A. Sulentic Apr 1997

Review Of The Frontier In American Culture: An Exhibition At The Newberry Library, August 26,1994- January 7,1995 Essays By Richard White And Patricia Nelson Limerick, Katherine A. Sulentic

Great Plains Quarterly

The term "frontier" elicits many different meanings and interpretations among scholars and the American public, as do Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West show and Frederick Jackson Turner's frontier thesis. Patricia Nelson Limerick and Richard White address these topics and try to appreciate their influence in American history and culture. With the help of artifacts from the Newberry Library, Limerick and White reveal how attitudes toward the old American West developed and how we understand that time and place today.

In "Frederick] ackson Turner and Buffalo Bill," White argues that both men's visions of the American West are ...


Review Of Elijah: No Ordinary Hero By Pauline Comeau, John Pederson Apr 1997

Review Of Elijah: No Ordinary Hero By Pauline Comeau, John Pederson

Great Plains Quarterly

A quiet "No" from the only Native member of Manitoba's legislature brought a dramatic halt to Canada's Meech Lake Accord in 1990. Designed as another attempt to establish an acceptable, functional governing agreement among the nation's provinces, Meech Lake was derailed over its slighting of the First Peoples of Canada. Forcing the role of aboriginals into the constitutional debate, Elijah Harper assumed a position of national prominence. For a man from the remote northern Ojibwa-Cree reserve of Red Sucker Lake, and for all of Canada, this was a startling moment. Pauline Comeau, a legislative reporter in 1990 ...


Review Of Rudder, Stick, And Throttle: Research And Reminiscences Of Flying In Nebraska By Robert E. Adwers, Wallace C. Peterson Apr 1997

Review Of Rudder, Stick, And Throttle: Research And Reminiscences Of Flying In Nebraska By Robert E. Adwers, Wallace C. Peterson

Great Plains Quarterly

This book is a must read for every pilot in Nebraska. Even readers with only a mild interest in fliers and flying will find Robert Adwers's low-key history and reminiscences about flying in Nebraska rewarding.

From his childhood and teenage years in the 1920s until now, Adwers has both keenly observed and actively participated in Nebraska flying, especially in the formative decades of the '20s and '30s. He had his first flight in the spring of 1929 at Steele Field, a cow pasture airport in northeast Omaha on land where a huge power plant now stands. From that time ...


Review Of Killing Custer: The Battle Of The Little Big Horn And The Fate Of The Plains Indians By James Welch With Paul Stekler., Kathryn E. Shanley Apr 1997

Review Of Killing Custer: The Battle Of The Little Big Horn And The Fate Of The Plains Indians By James Welch With Paul Stekler., Kathryn E. Shanley

Great Plains Quarterly

Killing Custer began in 1990 as a film project, a collaboration between Paul Stekler (producer and director) and James Welch (noted Blackfeet/Gros Ventre author). Once the film was completed (it aired November of 1992), Welch embarked on his own historical and "impressionistic" reading of those events in Plains Indian history, armed with Paul Stekler's "research, maps, photographs, reading skill, and moral support." Being a collaborative text straddling history, fiction, political essay, and memoir, the book eludes easy categorization; nevertheless, it is engaging in multidimensional ways and from a myriad of perspectives.

Why Killing Custer? "Custer's Last Stand ...


Review Of March Of The Columns: A Chronicle Of The 1876 Indian War, June 27-September 16, 1876 By James Willert, Gary A. Trogdon Apr 1997

Review Of March Of The Columns: A Chronicle Of The 1876 Indian War, June 27-September 16, 1876 By James Willert, Gary A. Trogdon

Great Plains Quarterly

Unbearable heat, driving thunderstorms, endless marching, and poor rations were daily fare for the soldier on the Plains. Weeks of tedious riding culminated in brief moments of sheer terror when the adversary was finally confronted. March of the Columns provides the day by day exploits, movements, and disappointments of US soldiers in pursuit of Cheyenne and Sioux warriors along the Yellowstone, Tongue, and Powder Rivers. The tale begins two days after the defeat of Custer's Seventh Cavalry and culminates with the end of the summer campaign. Sandwiched between are the numerous anecdotes, tragedies, and travels of Generals George Crook ...


Liberal Education On The Great Plains American Experiments, Canadian Flirtations, 1930-1950, Kevin Brooks Apr 1997

Liberal Education On The Great Plains American Experiments, Canadian Flirtations, 1930-1950, Kevin Brooks

Great Plains Quarterly

In 1929 the University of Chicago plan for liberal or general education was first proposed by its young president, Robert Maynard Hutchins. Sociologist Daniel Bell, in his history of general education in America says, "The Chicago plan sought to draw together the disciplines in three fields-the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sciences-and Jo consider problems which, by their nature, could only be understood by applying concepts from different disciplines. "1 Hutchins' proposal became the most discussed plan for balancing university curriculum's that had become specialized and disjointed in the first thirty years of the century, although it ...


Politics And Culture Of The Great Plains: An Introduction, John C. Comer Apr 1997

Politics And Culture Of The Great Plains: An Introduction, John C. Comer

Great Plains Quarterly

In April 1996 the Center for Great Plains Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln sponsored its twentieth interdisciplinary symposium, "Politics and Culture of the Great Plains." From papers and presentations by scholars from the United States and Canada, dealing with Indian rights, women's suffrage, education, the economy, elections, social movements, and historical and contemporary personalities, four are presented in this issue of Great Plains Quarterly.

"Treaty Seven and Guaranteed Representation: How Treaty Rights Can Evolve into Parliamentary Seats" deals with relations between sovereign nations-the Blackfoot Confederacy of southern Alberta and the national government of Canada. Kiera Ladner argues that ...


Conceptions Of The Nebraska Voter In 1882 Paradoxes And Complexities Among "Women", Carmen Heider Apr 1997

Conceptions Of The Nebraska Voter In 1882 Paradoxes And Complexities Among "Women", Carmen Heider

Great Plains Quarterly

Suffrage activism began in Nebraska in 1856 when Amelia Bloomer addressed the territorial house of representatives and argued that women should not be denied the right to vote.1 The house passed the bill, but the forty-day session ended before the council could vote on it. As Ann Wilhite states, "Had [the bill] passed, Nebraskans would have been the first in America-in the world-to enfranchise women."2 Elizabeth Cady Stanton (Fig. 1), Susan B. Anthony (Fig. 2), and George Francis Train toured Nebraska promoting suffrage in 1867, the year Nebraska became a state. In 1871, Nebraska voters defeated the suffrage ...


Treaty Seven And Guaranteed Representation How Treaty Rights Can Evolve Into Parliamentary Seats, Kiera L. Ladner Apr 1997

Treaty Seven And Guaranteed Representation How Treaty Rights Can Evolve Into Parliamentary Seats, Kiera L. Ladner

Great Plains Quarterly

Most of the Canadian plains region is covered by the "Numbered Treaties" negotiated in the 1870s between the government of the Dominion of Canada, acting for the British Crown, and the nations whose territories encompassed the area. Even at the time that the treaties were negotiated, the various signatories had different assumptions about what they actually meant. During the ensuing century and more that the treaties have existed, their meanings have been reinterpreted. With the repatriation of the Canadian constitution in 1982, giving treaty rights constitutional status and protection from the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the actual guarantees ...


Review Of The Ojibwa Of Western Canada, 1780-1870 By Laura Peers, Edward J. Hedican Apr 1997

Review Of The Ojibwa Of Western Canada, 1780-1870 By Laura Peers, Edward J. Hedican

Great Plains Quarterly

This innovative work is an ethno-historical study of the Ojibwa migration from the Great Lakes region to the Plains. Building on earlier studies by Harold Hickerson (The Chippewa and Their Neighbors) and Charles Bishop (The Northern Ojibwa and the Fur Trade), particularly in the use of the Hudson's Bay Company Archives, Peers reconstructs processes of historical change over a ninety year period. She is not content, however, simply to document the historical record, but instead takes on a much broader challenge, and herein lies the major value of her study.

The Ojibwa of western Canada are known by various ...


Cross-Border Ties Among Protest Movements The Great Plains Connection, Mildred A. Schwartz Apr 1997

Cross-Border Ties Among Protest Movements The Great Plains Connection, Mildred A. Schwartz

Great Plains Quarterly

This paper examines the connections among political protest movements in twentieth century western Canada and the United States. Protest movements are social movements and related organizations, including political protest parties, with the objective of deliberately changing government programs and policies. Those changes may also entail altering the composition of the government or even its form. Social movements involve collective efforts to bring about change in ways that avoid or reject established belief systems or organizations. They begin with assessments of what is wrong and propose a blueprint for action to achieve new goals by drawing on committed supporters willing to ...


Table And Contents- Spring 1997 Apr 1997

Table And Contents- Spring 1997

Great Plains Quarterly

GREAT PLAINS QUARTERLY

SPRING 1997 VOL. 17 NO.2

CONTENTS

POLITICS AND CULTURE OF THE GREAT PLAINS: AN INTRODUCTION John Comer

TREATY SEVEN AND GUARANTEED REPRESENTATION: HOW TREATY RIGHTS CAN EVOLVE INTO PARLIAMENTARY SEATS Kiera Ladner

LIBERAL EDUCATION ON THE GREAT PLAINS: AMERICAN EXPERIMENTS, CANADIAN FLIRTATIONS, 1930-1950 Kevin Brooks

CROSS-BORDER TIES AMONG PROTEST MOVEMENTS: THE GREAT PLAINS CONNECTION Mildred A. Schwartz

CONCEPTIONS OF THE NEBRASKA VOTER IN 1882: PARADOXES AND COMPLEXITIES AMONG "WOMEN" Carmen Heider

BOOK REVIEWS

The Perfection of the Morning: An Apprenticeship in Nature

Women and Texas History: Selected Essays

A New Life: Danish Emigration to North America ...


Notes And News- Spring 1997 Apr 1997

Notes And News- Spring 1997

Great Plains Quarterly

Notes and News

CENTER FOR GREAT PLAINS STUDIES SYMPOSIUM

CALL FOR PAPERS

UPCOMING CONFERENCES

A Conference and Celebration

A Place in the Universe

Canadian Cowboy Conference

SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY


Review Of Forging New Freedoms: Nativism, Education, And The Constitution, 1917-1927 By William G. Ross, Clyde Ellis Apr 1997

Review Of Forging New Freedoms: Nativism, Education, And The Constitution, 1917-1927 By William G. Ross, Clyde Ellis

Great Plains Quarterly

This is a penetrating analysis of the "complicated melange of war hysteria, fear of anarchy and Bolshevism, postwar anomie, nativism, pietism, populism, and progressivism" that prompted serious assaults on parochial schools during the years following the first World War. Fired by zealots who feared an America awash in a sea of immigrants whose schools and churches (and especially those operated by Germans) were bulwarks of ethnic identity, the era produced concerted efforts in Nebraska, Oregon, Michigan, Hawaii, and Washington to shut parochial schools, create compulsory attendance statutes, and outlaw foreign language instruction and use. In the name of Americanism, cried ...


Review Of The Crazy Horse Surrender Ledger Edited By Thomas R. Buecker And R. Eli Paul, Mark R. Ellis Apr 1997

Review Of The Crazy Horse Surrender Ledger Edited By Thomas R. Buecker And R. Eli Paul, Mark R. Ellis

Great Plains Quarterly

The Crazy Horse Surrender Ledger, a reproduction- photographed in its original formof the 1876-77 administrative ledger book of the Red Cloud Indian Agency, is an invaluable research tool for historians and Native American genealogists. Included in the ledger book are several censuses, information about agency rations, and documentation on agency passes and transfers.

The greater part of the ledger is devoted to the censuses, which enumerate the Oglala Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho who resided or surrendered at Red Cloud Agency during the Sioux War of 1876-77. Army officers conducted censuses in November 1876 and February 1877. Bands surrendering during ...


Review Of Creative Crusader: Edmund G. Kaufman And Mennonite Community By James C. Juhnke, Nancy Bernhardt-Holland Apr 1997

Review Of Creative Crusader: Edmund G. Kaufman And Mennonite Community By James C. Juhnke, Nancy Bernhardt-Holland

Great Plains Quarterly

Juhnke's candid biography of the SwissVolhynian educator, reformer, missionary, and Bethel College president (volume eight in the Cornelius H. Wedel series on Anabaptist and Mennonite history) is an appropriate companion to his earlier volume on Wedel himself. Juhnke follows up his study of one of the founding fathers of the German-American Mennonite community with this rich examination of a second generation leader caught between the idealism and isolationism of the founders and the newer attitude of practical accommodation to American ways.

Juhnke's well-integrated material on the origins, migrations, and doctrines of the various branches of the Mennonite movement ...


Review Of A New Life: Danish Emigration To North America As Described By The Emigrants Themselves In Letters, 1842-1946 By Niels Peter Stilling And Anne Lisbeth Olsen, David Iversen Apr 1997

Review Of A New Life: Danish Emigration To North America As Described By The Emigrants Themselves In Letters, 1842-1946 By Niels Peter Stilling And Anne Lisbeth Olsen, David Iversen

Great Plains Quarterly

According to Henning Bender of the Danes Worldwide Archives, writing in the preface, "This book is a gift from the Archives in Denmark to the [Danish Immigrant M]useum in the United States in commemoration of the official opening [in Elk Horn, Iowa in 1994]." A New Life is also a gift to laypeople and scholars interested in the study and preservation of primary source material regarding the history of Danish emigration.

Since the 1970s the authors have studied more than 4000 letters written by Danish emigrants and preserved by their families or friends, analyzing 1000 of these written by ...


Review Of The Perfection Of The Morning: An Apprenticeship In Nature By Sharon Butala, Lisa Knopp Apr 1997

Review Of The Perfection Of The Morning: An Apprenticeship In Nature By Sharon Butala, Lisa Knopp

Great Plains Quarterly

"One would hardly have sufficient motive to write an autobiography had not some radical change occurred in his life-conversion, entry into a new life, the operation of Grace," writes theorist Jean Starobinski in his 1980 essay, "Style of Autobiography." The radical change that led to Sharon Butala's transformation occurred in 1976 when, at the age of thirty six, she left the "urban, academic, feminist world" she had known in Saskatoon to marry Peter Butala, a forty-one-year-old bachelor who lived and worked on his family's ranch in extreme southwestern Saskatchewan. Employing the language of conversion, Butala says that her ...