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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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1997

Psychology

Propaganda

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Disinformation: Iraq, The United Nations (Un), And The United States Government (Usg) Nov 1997

Disinformation: Iraq, The United Nations (Un), And The United States Government (Usg)

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article describes components of alleged disinformation propagated by the Iraqi government concerning the USG in the context of UN inspection teams established pursuant to the Persian Gulf War of 1991.


Pen, Peru, Pornography, Propaganda, And Power Oct 1997

Pen, Peru, Pornography, Propaganda, And Power

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

The author discusses the postmodern approaches to basic tenets of science which often deconstruct basic concepts such as cause and effect, prediction, empirical validation, and the like.


Trends. The Land Mines Treaty: A Strict Constructionist Approach Sep 1997

Trends. The Land Mines Treaty: A Strict Constructionist Approach

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

The author discusses the United States Government (USG) announcement that it will not sign the Land Mines Treaty because land mines are still needed to protect US security


Political Propaganda: A Postmodernist Analysis (Part Iii), Editor Apr 1997

Political Propaganda: A Postmodernist Analysis (Part Iii), Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

The last installment of this article posits proto-principles of propaganda. (See IBPP Vol. 1, No. 17 and Vol. 2, No.1 for the first two installments.)


Political Propaganda: A Postmodernist Analysis (Part Ii), Editor Apr 1997

Political Propaganda: A Postmodernist Analysis (Part Ii), Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

Part I of this paper (IBPP, Vol. 1, No. 17) describes the conceptual problems inherent to propaganda as process. Now Part II will describe the psychological rationale for why propaganda is employed by governments and nonstate actors regardless of these problems.