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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

We'll See You Tomorrow, Devin N. Garnick Sep 2015

We'll See You Tomorrow, Devin N. Garnick

SURGE

On July 14th, 2015, Hannah climbed to the top of Half Dome, a stunning rock formation that rises thousands of feet above the valley floor at Yosemite National Park. She had talked about wanting to climb to the top of this breathtaking cliff for years and frequently mentioned that she had to tackle this feat “before she died.” I was amazed and proud to see photos of her impressive accomplishment, and wondered what she might achieve next. On July 21st, 2015, Hannah committed suicide. [excerpt]


Fearless Friday: Rebecca Borovsky, Christina L. Bassler Sep 2015

Fearless Friday: Rebecca Borovsky, Christina L. Bassler

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Rebecca Borovsky is a shining example of what it means to be a fearless leader. A member of the Class of 2016, she has made her mark on the Gettysburg campus and inspires not just students but her professors and coworkers as well. Rebecca found herself eager to make the most of her time here at Gettysburg College when she arrived just three years ago. An Organization and Management Studies Major (with a Business Minor), Rebecca is a fiercely loyal community member who embodies the definition of leadership. When asked what made her want to study OMS she stated that ...


The Scars Of Stigma, Andrew C. Nosti Sep 2015

The Scars Of Stigma, Andrew C. Nosti

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“I do”: two words that conclude the plot lines to hundreds of romantic movies. Two words that Hollywood has imprinted in our minds as the culmination of true love – words that children across the world dream about. [excerpt]


The Weight Of Sarcasm, Meghan E. O'Donnell Aug 2015

The Weight Of Sarcasm, Meghan E. O'Donnell

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I push the door open slowly, hoping that I’ve gotten to class early enough that there aren’t a lot of people in the room yet to look at me when I enter. As I walk to my seat, I put my bag down and grab a notebook out of it quickly. Then I spend the next ten minutes before class readjusting my shirt, whichever one I’d decided was most “slimming” that day, and pulling it away from my body so that it hides my stomach as best as possible. If I can, I’ll put books right ...


Object To Your Affection, Melissa J. Lauro Apr 2015

Object To Your Affection, Melissa J. Lauro

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Recently a guy in one of my classes defended objectification of women on the grounds that if he cares for a girl, he will treat her like he treats his most treasured objects; he used his coat as an example. He said that he loved his coat, he wouldn’t let it touch the ground, and he took great care of it; he would do the same for any girl he cared about, for “his girl.” [excerpt]


White People Tears, Beau A. Charles Apr 2015

White People Tears, Beau A. Charles

SURGE

Many students on the Gettysburg College campus were posed the question: what would your reaction be if the OU SAE scandal had occurred here?

By and far, people responded: Unsurprised.

Talk about high expectations. [excerpt]


Sincerely, The Quiet Girl, Brianna Dipanni Mar 2015

Sincerely, The Quiet Girl, Brianna Dipanni

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When I was younger, I used to think there was something horribly wrong with me, as if I had this mortal flaw. Some nights I used to lie awake in bed and just stare at the flickering red numbers of my bedside clock, wondering to myself when things would change. How long would it take to overcome my quiet phase? When will I finally be normal? [excerpt]


But, Why Not?, Anonymous Mar 2015

But, Why Not?, Anonymous

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I am the lucky one.

That’s how I’ve felt growing up in backwater Pennsyltucky, yet somehow managing to be openly queer. I came out to my friends and family as bi/pan-sexual in the 8th grade. None of my coming-out experiences resulted in horror stories. At that point most people had already guessed and accepted the fact that I was most definitely a queer kid. Even the most conservatively religious members of my friend group seemed perfectly okay with the fact that my sexuality didn’t fit with their ideas of morality. I was who I was, and ...


Fearless Friday: Our Founding Insurgents, Christina L. Bassler Feb 2015

Fearless Friday: Our Founding Insurgents, Christina L. Bassler

SURGE

Two years ago, four amazing women huddled together brainstorming the best way to popularize justice by making it applicable to college students and within hours Surge was born. Their vision, humor, and amazing fearless spirits have enabled hundreds of individuals to write over 200 blog posts which collectively have been viewed almost 180,000 times. [excerpt]


In The Absence Of Peace, Emma R. Okell Feb 2015

In The Absence Of Peace, Emma R. Okell

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Today, the Monday after the attack, all of the flags were at half mast. Everything continued as normal, as if nothing had happened. Yet there was an intensity in the air. I didn’t notice the increased police, but it was easy to feel the increased security. [excerpt]


Fearless Friday: Jennifer Mccary, Christina L. Bassler Feb 2015

Fearless Friday: Jennifer Mccary, Christina L. Bassler

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As we conclude Diversity Peer Educators Week, we honor Jennifer McCary, the fearless advisor. In addition to her roles with DPE, she is the Assistant Dean of College Life and Director of Student Rights and Responsibilities as well as the Director of the Women’s Center. The Diversity Peer Educators, or DPEs, are a group of students dedicated to facilitating conversations among the student body about various issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion. [excerpt]


Fearless Friday: Marli Horwitz, Christina L. Bassler Dec 2014

Fearless Friday: Marli Horwitz, Christina L. Bassler

SURGE

Over three and a half million people will have experienced homelessness in the past year- an overwhelming and disheartening statistic. For this week’s Fearless Friday, we highlight Marli Horwitz, who has courageously dedicated herself to debunking stereotypes, increasing awareness, and taking action towards ending homelessness. As program coordinator of D.C. Outfitters, she has led many trips to public parks in D.C., provided toiletries and clothing to people experiencing homelessness, and has planned two successful Homelessness Awareness Weeks. [excerpt]


The Pursuit Of Advil And Blow Pops, Andeulazia C. Hughes-Murdock Nov 2014

The Pursuit Of Advil And Blow Pops, Andeulazia C. Hughes-Murdock

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“Excuse me sir, where’s the Advil?” I ask politely as I walk, for the first time, into the Quik Mart across the street from the Colonial Hall apartments.

“Over there.” A middle-aged Indian man declares, apparently suspicious of my request to alleviate my cramps.

I smile back anyway, hoping that his face is permanently in a suspicious glance that makes me uncomfortable to go anywhere but the aisle in front of him. [excerpt]


A Difference Of Appearance, Charlotte H. Moreno Nov 2014

A Difference Of Appearance, Charlotte H. Moreno

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Appearance can seem like it’s everything.

My father is from California; his parents are from Mexico and El Salvador. He has tan skin and dark hair and is bilingual in English and Spanish. My mom, though also from California, is a combination of Irish, Cuban, and Hungarian. She passed on her fair skin, blonde hair, and blue eyes to me. [excerpt]


Studying Abroad, Toilet Paper, And Other Exercises In Missing The Point, Rashida Aluko-Roberts Feb 2014

Studying Abroad, Toilet Paper, And Other Exercises In Missing The Point, Rashida Aluko-Roberts

SURGE

I have been in Ghana only for a few days, and I can already tell I am going to love the place­—the people, the food, the environment, all remind me of my home country, Sierra Leone.

However, I don’t think I can adjust to the constant uttering by some of my peers about how this experience “makes them appreciate how much they have.” In the past four days, I have heard that same phrase over and over again. [excerpt]


Fashion Faux Pas And Cheetah Claws, Helena E. Yang Dec 2013

Fashion Faux Pas And Cheetah Claws, Helena E. Yang

SURGE

It feels like winter, a time for thick socks, boots, warm coats, and… leggings?

Leggings are one of those articles of clothing we completely overdo... Or UNDER-do. From a practicality standpoint, they’re marvels of winter, but why rock the thin, sheer leggings in 0° weather when you could just wear shorts? [excerpt]


Challenging Homelessness, Elizabeth D. Marshall Nov 2013

Challenging Homelessness, Elizabeth D. Marshall

SURGE

I had been homeless for about 28 hours. I sat on a sidewalk in Georgetown with a friend holding a cardboard sign that read, “Put a Smile on Our Faces” with a Dunkin Donuts cup at our feet. In the two and a half hours we sat there, hundreds of people passed, hundreds of people avoided eye contact, hundreds of people detoured around the lamppost on the street side of the sidewalk. A few people glanced at our sign. [excerpt]


What I'Ve Learned To Expect, Natalie S. Sherif Nov 2013

What I'Ve Learned To Expect, Natalie S. Sherif

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“Hey bitch!” someone yelled.

“Biiitttch!” I heard again from the car.

Music blared from inside. I pretended not to notice. Don’t give them the satisfaction, I thought. Don’t do something you’ll regret. So I stood there until the cars stopped whizzing past, pretending to ignore a car of boys yelling insults.

When the light changed, I hurried across Carlisle Street, got into my room, and lost it.

I was furious. Being reduced to an insult while walking home from a movie for class is infuriating. But, what really got under my skin was that incidents like this ...


Overheard At Gettysburg, Rashida Aluko-Roberts, Zakiya A. Brown, Monae S. Evans Oct 2013

Overheard At Gettysburg, Rashida Aluko-Roberts, Zakiya A. Brown, Monae S. Evans

SURGE

Monday. In Old TKE. A student of color is called in the hallway to hear the “funniest thing ever.” (giggling) “Night night little nigglet.”

Tuesday. In an AFS class. “I’m pretty sure the majority of black students in my private school were there because of sports.”

Wednesday. In Musselman. Woman: “I can’t believe Trayvon Martin got shot because someone thought skittles was a weapon.” Man: “To be honest, he did look suspicious because he was black.” [excerpt]


Fearless (Saturday): Michael Hannum, Michael W. Hannum Sep 2013

Fearless (Saturday): Michael Hannum, Michael W. Hannum

SURGE

In celebration of Alumni Homecoming Weekend and Hispanic Heritage Week, we proudly feature Michael Hannum, member of the Class of 2011, for his fearless commitment to fighting for social justice issues and his continued involvement in serving the Adams County community. Currently working with the Lincoln Intermediate Unit’s Migrant Education Program as a Recruitment Coordinator, Michael began finding his passion for helping identify families in the migrant community who need extra educational support when he was a first-year student just looking for something to do. [excerpt]


The Shortcomings Of A "Diverse" College Campus, Chelsea E. Broe Aug 2013

The Shortcomings Of A "Diverse" College Campus, Chelsea E. Broe

SURGE

“What is the diversity like at Gettysburg College?” As a tour guide, I get asked this question a lot. It’s a tricky question to answer: On one hand, I know that this is probably the family’s way of inquiring about race on campus without having to use such a taboo word, but on the other, my Diversity Peer Educator training chimes in and I want to challenge my questioner’s assumptions about what diversity even means. [excerpt]


Porch Culture: The Stoop Of Entitlement, Marina K. Crouse Aug 2013

Porch Culture: The Stoop Of Entitlement, Marina K. Crouse

SURGE

To the class of 2017:

Welcome to Gettysburg. Welcome to the next four years of your life. Welcome to the school where you spend vast amounts of time at or trying to get into a Fraternity House. Welcome to the school plagued by porch culture. [excerpt]


Out Of The Night, Riley Gryc Aug 2013

Out Of The Night, Riley Gryc

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I did not graduate.

After four years of college, waiting for the day I could shake President Riggs’ hand, receive my diploma, and depart our campus with pride and honor, that day never came. One of the hardest things I’ve ever had to do was watch from the back row of the audience as everyone I had attended school with for the last four years, my classmates, my friends, all received their diplomas and moved on without me. The stares from teachers I knew, the surprised looks from underclassmen, the careful tact with which everyone avoided the subject of ...


Brooks Better Not Come Back, Helena E. Yang Aug 2013

Brooks Better Not Come Back, Helena E. Yang

SURGE

Every time a new season of the Bachelorette starts, I tell myself that I won’t watch this season—that I won’t give in to the trashiness and the petty drama which is the Bachelor. But I can’t help it. Season after season I’m hooked and 17 seasons later… here I am. [excerpt]


In Defense Of Feminists Who Like Fashion, Margarita C. Delgado Jun 2013

In Defense Of Feminists Who Like Fashion, Margarita C. Delgado

SURGE

I’m sitting on the downtown R train one night in Manhattan, a copy of Vogue resting on my crossed legs. It is late and I am clearly unwinding peacefully as I thumb through page after glamorous page of my magazine. The train stops at Prince Street and there’s the usual flux of people in and out. Those left inside settle as the train pulls out of the station.

“Ugh. Fashion is stupid,” remarks one young man to another, both of whom are sitting diagonally from me and well within earshot. He’s watching me ignore him as I ...


Rape Culture Ruined My Favorite 80s Movie, Stephanie K. Adamczak May 2013

Rape Culture Ruined My Favorite 80s Movie, Stephanie K. Adamczak

SURGE

I will admit that I wish my best friend was Duckie, I want to attend just one Saturday detention with Emilio Estevez, and I listen to an unhealthy amount of music from the Smiths and the Psychedelic Furs. Yes, I am a child of the nineties, but I spent many high school nights watching John Hughes films and attempting to dye my hair the perfect shade of Molly Ringwald red. [excerpt]


What The Unglamorous Side Of Study Abroad Taught Me, Kathryn E. Bucolo May 2013

What The Unglamorous Side Of Study Abroad Taught Me, Kathryn E. Bucolo

SURGE

I’ve been gallivanting around this beautiful planet posing as a study abroad student taking classes and writing papers for the past academic year, one semester in England and one in Argentina (where I still am) and, just like all the brochures, promotions, and panels of study abroad survivors say, it has been absolutely chock-full of amazing experiences, people, places, foods—I think “transformative” is the proper term.

But transformative can mean many things. It doesn’t just mean that you “find yourself” or “change your life”—it means you see the less glamorous stuff about yourself, too. [excerpt]


Who Do You Think You Are?, Elizabeth A. Rupert May 2013

Who Do You Think You Are?, Elizabeth A. Rupert

SURGE

Now, I understand that labels are a natural part of our society. We’ve even posted recently about our editor’s tendency to label other people based off of their clothes or attitudes.

But which labels do we get to choose for ourselves? Ideally, I’d like to say that I can label myself any way that I want to. Don’t you think that in a society like ours we should be at liberty to choose our own identity? [excerpt]


Fearless: Diversity Peer Educators, Center For Public Service May 2013

Fearless: Diversity Peer Educators, Center For Public Service

SURGE

The Diversity Peer Educators was started in the Fall of 2012 with the vision of starting conversations about and advocating for diversity issues and inclusion on this campus. Right off the bat, twelve students (of all different class years) were trained in how to facilitate those conversations and lead activities that make those conversations a little easier. Now, there are seventeen DPEs fearlessly making change at Gettysburg College. [excerpt]


You Can't Always Get What You Want, Laura J. Koenig May 2013

You Can't Always Get What You Want, Laura J. Koenig

SURGE

My parents used to tell me that I wasn’t entitled to anything—that I should be happy with what I have and not assume that I deserved something unless I had worked for it. Either way, entitlement is something that I’ve been thinking about a lot lately. So what do I think I’m entitled to? I’m not really sure. Maybe I’m entitled to making my own choices about what I’m going to do after graduation or having friends that treat me well. Maybe not. [excerpt]