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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Great Plains Quarterly

Oklahoma

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

"Her Heritage Is Helpful": Race, Ethnicity, And Gender In The Politicization Of Ladonna Harris, Sarah Eppler Janda Jan 2005

"Her Heritage Is Helpful": Race, Ethnicity, And Gender In The Politicization Of Ladonna Harris, Sarah Eppler Janda

Great Plains Quarterly

"What is it like to live in a tent?" asked Robert Kennedy's five-year-old daughter, Kerry, when she met LaDonna Harris for the first time in 1965. LaDonna assured her that Indians no longer lived in "tents" and Kerry's mother, Ethel, jokingly told LaDonna not to disillusion the child. LaDonna insisted that she wanted Kerry to have an accurate understanding of what Indians were like, to which Kerry responded by asking if she shot a bow and arrow. The exchange speaks volumes about the ignorance through which mainstream society viewed Native Americans, and mirrored many of Harris's other ...


Discrimination Against And Adaptation Of Italians In The Coal Counties Of Oklahoma, David G. Loconto Jan 2004

Discrimination Against And Adaptation Of Italians In The Coal Counties Of Oklahoma, David G. Loconto

Great Plains Quarterly

In the late 1800s and early 1900s coal reigned supreme in what is now southeastern Oklahoma. As was the case in the northeastern United States, Italians and other immigrants from southern and eastern Europe were brought in as a form of inexpensive labor to work the mines. Italians had different customs, a different language, a unique appearance, and a lack of training in mining compared with the American, English, Irish, and Scottish miners that preceded them. These differences were the foundation of an atmosphere in which immigrant groups would settle in communities. The results were struggles between southern and eastern ...


Land, Justice, And Angie Debo Telling The Truth To-And About-Your Neighbors, Patricia Nelson Limerick Oct 2001

Land, Justice, And Angie Debo Telling The Truth To-And About-Your Neighbors, Patricia Nelson Limerick

Great Plains Quarterly

When Angie Debo was an old woman, she lived in her hometown of Marshall, Oklahoma, where she had warm and close ties with her neighbors. She also had a more geographically dispersed network: a list of several hundred people, scattered around the nation, whom she would mobilize to write senators and congressmen, or to the president, on behalf of particular campaigns for Indian rights. She sent the members of her network mimeographed letters and in urgent circumstances made phone calls to them. She got her network geared up to write in support of Alaskan Native land claims, an enlargement of ...