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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Book Review: The Life Of Elaine Goodale Eastman, Ruth Ann Alexander Jan 2006

Book Review: The Life Of Elaine Goodale Eastman, Ruth Ann Alexander

Great Plains Quarterly

As a biologist, Theodore Sargent has taken a different approach to the life and work of Massachusetts writer Elaine Goodale Eastman. For instance, he admires her childhood poetry published when she was living at Sky Farm in the Berkshires. He likes her "eye for detail and skill with words," although many literary scholars have dismissed her verse as conventional in form and sentimental in content.


Book Review: Teaching In Eden: Lessons From Cedar Point, Gregg Siewert Jan 2006

Book Review: Teaching In Eden: Lessons From Cedar Point, Gregg Siewert

Great Plains Quarterly

Judging from the title, one might expect this book to offer some resolution to America's ongoing debate regarding the teaching of evolution, creationism, and intelligent design. It is, instead, Janovy's attempt to shake higher education by the shoulders and bring it to its senses, asking that university instruction shift its focus from content to larger questions of process and values (for want of a better term: liberal arts and sciences). As Janovy states, "I contend that the arts and sciences ideals - breadth of understanding, courage to explore anywhere, patience with disagreement - are the best antidotes to our current ...


Book Review: Indians In Unexpected Places, William Bauer Jan 2006

Book Review: Indians In Unexpected Places, William Bauer

Great Plains Quarterly

In his first book, Playing Indian (1998), Philip Deloria examined the ways that non-Indians used American Indian images to create their own identity. In his latest book, Deloria looks at the American Indians who challenged the assumptions that often informed those representations. During the first few decades of the twentieth century, American Indians appeared in places where non-Indians did not expect to find them-on football fields, in beauty parlors, in Cadillacs. As Indians entered these unexpected places, they challenged notions of modernity, tradition, and the conventional role many people had created for them. Ultimately, though, they failed to change America ...


Book Review: Treasures Of Gilcrease: Selections From The Permanent Collection, Janet Catherine Berlo Jan 2006

Book Review: Treasures Of Gilcrease: Selections From The Permanent Collection, Janet Catherine Berlo

Great Plains Quarterly

All who study the visual culture of the American West are familiar with the vast holdings of the Gilcrease Museum. This excellent introduction to the museum consists of five essays on its component collections. The introduction to Thomas Gilcrease himself (1890-1962) chronicles his mixed ethnicity (born of European and Muskogee-Creek heritage, he was enrolled as a Creek) and his success in the oil business. His several decades of avidly collecting the American objects, paintings, and manuscripts that would become the Gilcrease Museum (which initially opened in San Antonio, before moving to Tulsa in 1949) is told in a lively though ...


Book Review: Writing Out Of Place: Regionalism, Women, And American Literary Culture, Kathleen Boardman Jan 2006

Book Review: Writing Out Of Place: Regionalism, Women, And American Literary Culture, Kathleen Boardman

Great Plains Quarterly

Although it has everything to do with location, nineteenth-century American literary regionalism is nor "about" natural geographic boundaries, according to Judith Fetterley and Marjorie Pryse. That is, issues of vantage point, marginalization, and gender and racial positioning are crucial to this literature, and the lens of feminist standpoint theory brings it sharply into focus. In contrast, the habit of categorizing by setting - Sarah Orne Jewett and the Maine coast or Mary Austin in the California desert - suggests geographic determinism and distracts us from what these writers might have in common: regionalism as "a discourse or a mode elf analysis" and ...


Book Review: Myself And Strangers: A Memoir Of Apprenticeship, Mark Busby Jan 2006

Book Review: Myself And Strangers: A Memoir Of Apprenticeship, Mark Busby

Great Plains Quarterly

Over the years John Graves, Texas's most noted environmental writer, has lamented time wasted on trying to produce a major work of fiction, a subject that becomes especially clear in Graves's memoir, Myself and Strangers, where he suggests that he should have produced more but was too often distracted.


Book Review; The Garden Of Art: Vic Cicansky, Sculptor, Ruth Chambers Jan 2006

Book Review; The Garden Of Art: Vic Cicansky, Sculptor, Ruth Chambers

Great Plains Quarterly

Don Kerr's The Garden of Art: Vic Cicansky, Sculptor reviews the career and practice of one of Saskatchewan's must important visual artists. Although paperback and inexpensive, the book includes an illustrated text followed by sixty-four pages of full-color photographs that provide a retrospective of Cicansky's work. The author describes Cicansky's sculptures and his working process and records relevant details of his life.


Great Plains Quarterly Winter 2006 Editorial Matter Jan 2006

Great Plains Quarterly Winter 2006 Editorial Matter

Great Plains Quarterly

Great Plains Quarterly Winter 2006 Editorial Matter, Table of Contents, and Book Notes.


Book Review: Finding Sand Creek: History, Archeology, And The 1864 Massacre Site, Lincoln Faller Jan 2006

Book Review: Finding Sand Creek: History, Archeology, And The 1864 Massacre Site, Lincoln Faller

Great Plains Quarterly

Metal detritus of war and an old map, recently discovered in Chicago helped an interdisciplinary team of historians, archeologists, geomorphologists, ethnographers, remote imagers, and descendants of the victims of the Sand Creek Massacre to find the exact site where that atrocity was enacted; so this book reports,


Book Review: Halfbreed: The Remarkable True Story Of George Bent - Caught Between The Worlds Of The Indian And The White Man, Lincoln Faller Jan 2006

Book Review: Halfbreed: The Remarkable True Story Of George Bent - Caught Between The Worlds Of The Indian And The White Man, Lincoln Faller

Great Plains Quarterly

In the last two decades of his life Bent became a prolific letter-writer as well; more than five hundred of his letters survive in various archives. His chief correspondents were Grinnell, with whom he collaborated in shaping the foundational texts of Cheyenne history and ethnography, and George Hyde, who also worked with Grinnell and supplied him with a great deal of information gleaned from his own far more extensive correspondence with Brent. Bent's letters to Hyde became the basis for Hyde's Life of George Bent: Written from His Letters (essentially completed by 1916, hut not published until 1968 ...


Book Review: Conversations With Texas Writers, Don B. Graham Jan 2006

Book Review: Conversations With Texas Writers, Don B. Graham

Great Plains Quarterly

This book contains fifty interviews with "Texas" writers, including one "interview" with a dead writer, the pulp hero Robert E. Howard (author of the Conan books, etc.). It's actually Howard's biographer who's interviewed, which is odd and conveys a significance that's unwarranted. The book is also a bit Austin-centric, as twenty of the authors live in the capital city.


Book Review: Horizons West: Directing The Western From John Ford To Clint Eastwood, Joanna Hearne Jan 2006

Book Review: Horizons West: Directing The Western From John Ford To Clint Eastwood, Joanna Hearne

Great Plains Quarterly

First published in 1969, Horizons West was one of the early structuralist treatments of a Hollywood genre and a pivotal text in American writing on the Western. Borrowing from anthropological studies of myth, Kitses outlined a series of binary oppositions between the individual and the community, nature and culture, the West and the East, and wedded this thematic outline to a stylistic exploration of three directors: Anthony Mann, Budd Boetticher, and Sam Peckinpah. The book signaled serious academic consideration of Westerns not only as a legitimate art form but also as a complex and meaningful expression of American cultural history ...


Book Review: Viet Cong At Wounded Knee: The Trail Of A Blackfeet Activist, Tom Holm Jan 2006

Book Review: Viet Cong At Wounded Knee: The Trail Of A Blackfeet Activist, Tom Holm

Great Plains Quarterly

Woody Kipp's life story is a reflection of a new generation of Native writers and activists. His autobiography has nothing to do with trying to save the white world from itself or to explain Indians to a curious and perhaps even sympathetic white audience. The white world literally and figuratively took aim at Woody Kipp (and a number of other American Indian Vietnam veterans) for daring to oppose the injustices he saw in Indian life. He became, as the title of his book indicates, the then-current enemy of the American state. He was, ironically, a domestic version of the ...


Book Review: Charles M. Russell: The Storyteller's Art, Jim Hoy Jan 2006

Book Review: Charles M. Russell: The Storyteller's Art, Jim Hoy

Great Plains Quarterly

Charles M. Russell: The Storyteller's Art, by shedding light on Russell's ability to create narrative in writing, has the added advantage of contributing critical insight into his painting as well.


Book Review: The Oregon Trail: An American Saga, Howard Jablon Jan 2006

Book Review: The Oregon Trail: An American Saga, Howard Jablon

Great Plains Quarterly

David Dary's The Oregon Trail is a pleasant excursion on a well-traveled road. His hook is not a trail-blazing work of the stature of such classics as Francis Parkman's The California and Oregon Trail (1849) and Bernard De Voto's The Year of Decision, 1846 (1943), nor is it as erudite as John D. Unruh's The Plains Across (1979) nor as encyclopedic as Merrill J. Matte's Platte River Road Narratives (1988); however, it remains a useful introduction to the subject.


Book Review: Alien Heart: The Life And Work Of Margaret Laurence, Frances W. Kaye Jan 2006

Book Review: Alien Heart: The Life And Work Of Margaret Laurence, Frances W. Kaye

Great Plains Quarterly

The best introduction to Margaret Laurence will always be the writings of Margaret Laurence, especially the five Manawaka books, the three published volumes of her correspondence, and her memoir. But after one has become acquainted with that complex, vulnerable, wise, generous, and conflicted woman/writer, Alien Heart is a good source for recapitulation and further detail. Without blinking at or emphasizing Margaret's drinking and sometimes self-destructive relationships, Powers strongly recalls her kindness, her passion, her idiom, and her "place to stand upon."


Book Review: The Bar U And Canadian Ranching History, A. A. Den Otter Jan 2006

Book Review: The Bar U And Canadian Ranching History, A. A. Den Otter

Great Plains Quarterly

Located almost directly south of Calgary, Alberta, the North West Cattle Company, or Bar U, is one of the longest surviving large ranches on the Canadian Prairies, Founded in 1881 during a land rush, it was one of several to acquire large leases on government land, Under the management of Fred Stimson, an experienced farmer from Quebec, the Bar U prospered, partly because of cheap land hut mainly because of solid management and good marketing and transportation strategies,


Migration Out Of 1930s Rural Eastern Oklahoma: Insights For Climate Change Research, Robert Mcleman Jan 2006

Migration Out Of 1930s Rural Eastern Oklahoma: Insights For Climate Change Research, Robert Mcleman

Great Plains Quarterly

I undertook an investigation of how rural populations responded to a period of adverse climatic conditions in rural eastern Oklahoma during the 1930s, with particular interest in those households that adapted by migrating to rural California. This is not the first time that 19305 Oklahoma has been the subject of research into how people and communities adapt to difficult environmental conditions. In the wake of a 1985 conference entitled "Social Adaptation to Semi-Arid Environments" at the Center for Great Plains Studies in Lincoln, Great Plains Quarterly presented a series of papers by well-known scholars exploring human-environment interactions that gave rise ...


Book Review: The Railroad And The State: War, Politics, And Technology In Nineteenth-Century America, James A. Ward Jan 2006

Book Review: The Railroad And The State: War, Politics, And Technology In Nineteenth-Century America, James A. Ward

Great Plains Quarterly

Angevine's book is a thought-provoking new look at how the railroads affected the United States. Among other things, it promotes a fresh understanding of why the government took over the railways in 1917 to unsnarl traffic at eastern ports.


Book Review: The Poetry Home Repair Manual: Practical Advice For Beginning Poets, Judith Sornberger Jan 2006

Book Review: The Poetry Home Repair Manual: Practical Advice For Beginning Poets, Judith Sornberger

Great Plains Quarterly

Kooser's Poetry Home Repair Manual goes a long way toward aiding poets in finding ways to reflect that "order beyond" with lots of practical advice from someone they will find delightful to hang out with.


Book Review: Encyclopedia Of The Lewis And Clark Expeditions, Stephen S. Witte Jan 2006

Book Review: Encyclopedia Of The Lewis And Clark Expeditions, Stephen S. Witte

Great Plains Quarterly

In their preface, the authors hope "that this book will prove a valuable resource to students of the Lewis and Clark Expedition." Regrettably, numerous errors and contradictions drastically reduce its value.


Book Review: Horizons West: Directing The Western From John Ford To Clint Eastwood, Joanna Hearne Jan 2006

Book Review: Horizons West: Directing The Western From John Ford To Clint Eastwood, Joanna Hearne

Great Plains Quarterly

The new edition is a useful overview of six major directors, a densely descriptive homage to the genre, and a touchstone in the history of film genre criticism. Critics familiar with the 1969 edition will appreciate the way Kitses has updated and elaborated on his initial premises. Readers new to Western genre criticism should see the work as an important strand in a broad range of critical discourses that now includes, among others, studies of gender in Westerns by Lee Clark Mitchell and Jane Tompkins, materialist, industry-based analyses by Peter Stanfield, Peter Lehman's extensive readings and re-readings of John ...


Book Review: Goodbye, Judge Lynch: The End Of A Lawless Era In Wyoming's Big Horn Basin, Stephen J. Leonard Jan 2006

Book Review: Goodbye, Judge Lynch: The End Of A Lawless Era In Wyoming's Big Horn Basin, Stephen J. Leonard

Great Plains Quarterly

In Goodbye, Judge Lynch, John W. Davis details two early twentieth-century murder cases and their aftermaths in Wyoming's Big Horn Basin. In 1902, Jim Gordon killed his older brother, Thomas, supposedly because Jim coveted Thomas's wife, Margaret. The jury found Jim innocent of first- and second-degree murder, but convicted him of manslaughter. Jim demanded a new trial. The second jury convicted him of first-degree murder, a capital offense. Jim's attorney appealed to the Wyoming Supreme Court arguing that conviction of a greater offense in the second trail violated the U.S. Constitution's prohibition against double jeopardy.


Book Review: The Fred Jones Jr. Museum Of Art At The University Of Oklahoma: Selected Works, Gary Hood Jan 2006

Book Review: The Fred Jones Jr. Museum Of Art At The University Of Oklahoma: Selected Works, Gary Hood

Great Plains Quarterly

In an effort to outline the depth of the collections of the University of Oklahoma Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, Selected Works is a genuine mix of many varying styles and media. After gifts of Asian art formed the beginnings of the OU art collection in the 1930s, a significant acquisition was made by founding director Oscar Jacobson in 1948 consisting of 117 American paintings from the "Advancing American Art" exhibition organized by the u.s. Department of State. Many of the works are illustrated. The paintings cover the gamut of American Modernism, including work by Georgia O'Keeffe ...


Book Review: A Common Humanity: Kansas Populism And The Battle For Justice And Equality, 1854-1903, Jeffrey A. Johnson Jan 2006

Book Review: A Common Humanity: Kansas Populism And The Battle For Justice And Equality, 1854-1903, Jeffrey A. Johnson

Great Plains Quarterly

Across the landscape of modern American politics, the "Populist moment," as Lawrence Goodwyn's 1976 study labeled it, has fascinated scholars. Indeed, late nineteenth-century Populism posed a vocal and effectual political voice for Gilded Age America's discontented. Since his original 1969 study, Kansas Populism: Ideas and Men, O. Gene Clanton has meticulously examined the fundamental role of Kansa, Populists in shaping local and national politics. A Common Humanity, with great efficacy, revisits and reinterprets Kansas's Populism as a fight for fundamental working-class rights and agrarian values, amidst industrialization gone awry.


Book Review: Barbed Wire: An Ecology Of Modernity, Alan Krell Jan 2006

Book Review: Barbed Wire: An Ecology Of Modernity, Alan Krell

Great Plains Quarterly

The first years of this century were "barbed" in more ways than one. Three books were published in quick succession on barbed wire: the first by Olivier Razac, then by me, and, most recently, by Reviel Netz. Barbed Wire: An Ecology of Modernity builds on Netz's sagacious essay written for the London Review of Books (July 20, 2000).


Book Review: Travelling Knowledges: Positioning The Immigrant Reader Of Aboriginal Literatures In Canada, Rob Appleford Jan 2006

Book Review: Travelling Knowledges: Positioning The Immigrant Reader Of Aboriginal Literatures In Canada, Rob Appleford

Great Plains Quarterly

Canadian Aboriginal writing has blossomed in the past two decades and made a major contribution to the cultural life of both Aboriginal peoples and the general public. Given this wealth, it becomes necessary for the non-Aboriginal literary critic to develop sensitive models for approaching this creative and critical work, both in the classroom and in academic research. The question becomes: how can a non-Aboriginal critic use her "outsider" status in an enabling way when teaching and studying this culturally-specific material? In Travelling Knowledges: Positioning the 1m/Migrant Reader of Aboriginal Literatures in Canada, Renate Eigenbrod has attempted to use her ...


Book Review: Indian Country: Essays On Contemporary Native Culture, William Asikinack Jan 2006

Book Review: Indian Country: Essays On Contemporary Native Culture, William Asikinack

Great Plains Quarterly

In examining this volume, I came to realize very quickly that Valaskakis is following the style of a traditional North American Indigenous person whom we are meeting for the first time. By way of introduction, she speaks about her family and family life, in a narrative style, in chapter 1. She finishes the book by going full circle and returning to how we are "all related."


Book Review: When Skins Were Money: A History Of The Fur Trade, Peter Bleed Jan 2006

Book Review: When Skins Were Money: A History Of The Fur Trade, Peter Bleed

Great Plains Quarterly

When Skins Were Money: A History of the Fur Trade is James A. Hanson's grand synthesis of the trade in furs and skins that is the focus of the Museum of the Fur Trade in Chadron, Nebraska. Like the museum itself, When Skins Were Money has a worldwide scope and a long view as it seeks to describe the evolution and impacts of the fur trade. Its basic premise, that the fur trade has been important to world history but underappreciated and misunderstood, is advanced in a well-produced volume filled with wonderful things. Most pages have handsome illustrations that ...


Book Review: Living With Strangers: The Nineteenth-Century Sioux And The Canadian-American Borderlands, James T. Carroll Jan 2006

Book Review: Living With Strangers: The Nineteenth-Century Sioux And The Canadian-American Borderlands, James T. Carroll

Great Plains Quarterly

The history of the Sioux people of the Northern Plains is complicated by the artificial boundary line between the United States and Canada. This division has prevented a complete and thorough treatment of Sioux history since most scholars focus on either the American or Canadian portions of the saga. David McCrady's Living with Strangers, however, fills this gap for the nineteenth-century portion of Sioux history. McCrady defines and develops a theory of borderlands and adroitly applies his ideas to the Sioux who ignored diplomatic boundaries and benefited from multiple illicit crossings. Native peoples were pragmatic, self-serving, and clever in ...