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Great Plains Quarterly

1995

Articles 1 - 30 of 89

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Bison Ecology, Brule And Yankton Winter Hunting, And The Starving Winter Of 1832--33, Richmond Clow Jan 1995

Bison Ecology, Brule And Yankton Winter Hunting, And The Starving Winter Of 1832--33, Richmond Clow

Great Plains Quarterly

On 6 February 1833, William Laidlow, the American Fur Company's leading official at Fort Pierre wrote that Brule (Sicangu) and Yankton (Ihanktonwan ) camps "have been in a state of starvation all winter, and have suffered most dreadfully." The entire winter of 1832-33 was a "starving time" on the middle Missouri River in present day south-central South Dakota because these skilled tribal hunters found no bison in a land where the herds were frequently described as "immense." Why knowledgeable and efficient professional tribal hunters, as well as post employees, were hungry that winter, in this apparent land of abundance, presents ...


Index Jan 1995

Index

Great Plains Quarterly

Index 279-286 (8 pages)


Notes & News Jan 1995

Notes & News

Great Plains Quarterly

GREAT PLAINS STUDIES SYMPOSIA

BOOK AWARDS (David Wishart; John Wunder)

CALLS FOR PAPERS

CANADIAN STUDIES GRANT PROGRAMS, 1996-97

FROM THE ARCHIVES (Richard Popp)

ENCYCLOPEDIA OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ASSOCIATIONS


Review Of The Life And Legacy Of Annie Oakley By Glenda Riley, Donald Arthur Clark Jan 1995

Review Of The Life And Legacy Of Annie Oakley By Glenda Riley, Donald Arthur Clark

Great Plains Quarterly

Riley proves an excellent writer, adeptly disclosing the personality of this private woman. Poverty ridden as a child, Oakley learned to hunt and became an expert markswoman. She married the first man she beat in a shooting competition, Frank Butler. Frank, perhaps the ideal husband, managed Annie and their engagements with Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. Throughout the years they maintained high moral standards; neither smoked, drank or cursed. Annie, ever the Victorian lady, always wore a dress and always rode side-saddle while proving herself a worldclass sharpshooter. She never forgot those less fortunate than herself, providing gifts to ...


Table Of Contents Jan 1995

Table Of Contents

Great Plains Quarterly

THE PROGRESSIVE CONTEXT OF THE NEBRASKA CAPITOL: THE COLLABORATION OF GOODHUE AND TACK (Frederick C. Luebke)

THE 1992 SECESSION MOVEMENT IN SOUTHWEST KANSAS (Peter J. McCormick)

BISON ECOLOGY, BRULE AND YANKTON WINTER HUNTING, AND THE STARVING WINTER OF 1832-33 (Richmond Clow)

BOOK REVIEWS

An Unspeakable Sadness: The Dispossession of the Nebraska Indians

The Lance and the Shield: The Life and Times of Sitting Bull

Following the Indian Wars: The Story of the Newspaper Correspondents among the Indian Campaigners

On Turner's Trail: 100 Years of Writing Western History

The Life and Legacy of Annie Oakley

Redefining the American Dream

Where ...


Review Of An Unspeakable Sadness: The Dispossession Of The Nebraska Indians By David J. Wishart, Francis Paul Prucha Jan 1995

Review Of An Unspeakable Sadness: The Dispossession Of The Nebraska Indians By David J. Wishart, Francis Paul Prucha

Great Plains Quarterly

This is a well-written and authoritative book, but it is not a pleasant book to read, for it is a story of unremitting sadness. It traces the nineteenth-century history of four Indian tribes whose homelands in 1800 covered what is now the eastern two-thirds of the state of Nebraska-the Omahas and the Otoe-Missourias along the Missouri River, the Pone as north of the Niobrara River near its mouth, and the Pawnees (in four bands) in the central area of the state.


Review Of Where The Sky Began: Land Of The Tallgrass Prairie By John Madson, Mikko Saikku Jan 1995

Review Of Where The Sky Began: Land Of The Tallgrass Prairie By John Madson, Mikko Saikku

Great Plains Quarterly

Appendices include a useful list of prairie nurseries and seed sources and a directory of representative tallgrass prairies. Although the directory is by no means intended to be comprehensive, one can still complain about the omission of sites such as the Rockefeller Experimental Tract near Lawrence, Kansas. Where the Sky Began, possibly supplemented by a localized and biologically more detailed study (e.g., O. J. Reichman's Konza Prairie: A Tallgrass Natural History), will give the general reader a highly enjoyable introduction to the history and biota of the tallgrass prairie.


Notes And News Jan 1995

Notes And News

Great Plains Quarterly

GREAT PLAINS STUDIES SYMPOSIA

FREDERICK C. LUEBKE AWARD (David Murphy; Don D. Walker; Doreen Barrie; Howard R. Lamar; David Wishart)

CALLS FOR PAPERS

JOINT CONFERENCE


Breaking The Silence Hymns And Folk Songs In O. E. Rølvaag's Immigrant Trilogy, Phillip R. Coleman-Hull Jan 1995

Breaking The Silence Hymns And Folk Songs In O. E. Rølvaag's Immigrant Trilogy, Phillip R. Coleman-Hull

Great Plains Quarterly

In an essay written in 1933 Einar Haugen briefly mentions that "RØlvaag's most delicate observations take the form of music, and rhythmic sound becomes to him the highest form of beauty." Haugen refers merely to the sonorous qualities of the prairie and never delves into the songs-both Norwegian folk songs and hymns-that surface through O. E. RØlvaag's immigrant trilogy. Since 1933, critics have explored a multitude of themes related to Giants in the Earth, Peder Victorious, and Their Father's God, and much attention has been given to the issue of cultural integrity as espoused by RØlvaag. Language ...


Review Of On Turner's Trail: 100 Years Of Writing Western History By Wilbur R. Jacobs, Mary Young Jan 1995

Review Of On Turner's Trail: 100 Years Of Writing Western History By Wilbur R. Jacobs, Mary Young

Great Plains Quarterly

When Frederick Jackson Turner retired, he took up residence at the Huntington Library in California. Turner left his papers to the Huntington, thus assuring that the Turner industry would flourish there. Wilbur Jacobs is among the resident senior scholars who have tended the flame. Jacobs is a long-time critic of Turner's imperialist celebrations of progress, dichotomous views of savagism and civilization, and anti-environmentalism. Turner ignored much of the development of social science in his own time and confused ruling theory with multiple working hypotheses. Jacobs repeats these criticisms in several contexts in the present volume, but champions Turner as ...


"Same Horse, New Wagon" Tradition And Assimilation Among The Jews Of Wichita, 1865,1930, Hal Rothman Jan 1995

"Same Horse, New Wagon" Tradition And Assimilation Among The Jews Of Wichita, 1865,1930, Hal Rothman

Great Plains Quarterly

Despite the emphasis on ethnicity and crosscultural contact that permeates the New Western History, western historians have neglected the Jews of the American West. Often mislabeled as German ethnics because of their surnames or ignored altogether, Jews of the interior West in particular have been left out of the intellectual revolution sweeping the field. Their modern demographic distribution in coastal and urban areas has been mistaken for their historic presence, and their contribution to local and regional culture has been overlooked. As a result, the Jews of large urban areas in the West have received the vast majority of scholarly ...


Review Of The End Of American Exceptionalism: Frontier Anxiety From The Old West To The New Deal By David M. Wrobel, Kathleen A. Boardman Jan 1995

Review Of The End Of American Exceptionalism: Frontier Anxiety From The Old West To The New Deal By David M. Wrobel, Kathleen A. Boardman

Great Plains Quarterly

More than a decade before the 1890 Census, some Americans began to perceive that the frontier was disappearing; they worried that, with the closing of the frontier, the country might lose its tough and resourceful individualism, its ability to assimilate foreigners and forge democratic institutions, its safety valve and its future hopes-in short, its uniqueness. Soon this "frontier anxiety" pervaded American writing, speech, and thought. David M. Wrobel traces the theme of frontier anxiety and its variations in American journalism, political rhetoric and policy, literature and popular culture, and academic discussions from the 1880s to the 1930s. He shows that ...


Sense Of Place In The Prairie Environment Settlement And Ecology In Rural Geary County, Kansas, Nina Veregge Jan 1995

Sense Of Place In The Prairie Environment Settlement And Ecology In Rural Geary County, Kansas, Nina Veregge

Great Plains Quarterly

Many people who drive across Kansas on the Interstate or on Route 50 see the state as a single, unchanging stretch of treeless plain. A more perceptive observer witnesses the gradual transition from the east to the west: from rolling hills and wooded vales to wide open grassland and sage plain; from corn to winter wheat; from farms to ranches and feedlots; from running streams to dry washes; from humidity on a summer day that is relieved only by constant wind to dry heat blown across grassland untempered by stream valley microclimates. It appears a seamless transition where distinctions are ...


Review Of Owning Western History: A Guide To Collecting Rare Documents, Historical Letters, And Valuable Photographs From The Old West By Warren B. Anderson, Warren W. Caldwell Jan 1995

Review Of Owning Western History: A Guide To Collecting Rare Documents, Historical Letters, And Valuable Photographs From The Old West By Warren B. Anderson, Warren W. Caldwell

Great Plains Quarterly

As the reader will have surmised, this volume is about collecting. It might well have been titled, "Western History: Via Waste Paper, Photographs and Other Ephemera." Be warned, it is not concerned with literary debris, but rather the remains of defunct stock companies, failed businesses, "wanted posters," and seemingly an infinity of other secular paper.

There is little to review here. The book is unabashedly descriptive, anecdotal, and largely non-critical. None the less, it has the virtue of directing the scholar to many documents of "western" society that otherwise might be neglected, and the pay-off can be interesting.


Review Of The Orphan Trains: Placing Out In America By Marilyn Irvin Holt, Fred Erisman Jan 1995

Review Of The Orphan Trains: Placing Out In America By Marilyn Irvin Holt, Fred Erisman

Great Plains Quarterly

One of the most haunting stories of the American West is the legend of the "orphan trains." Relating the practice of taking homeless children from the teeming cities and resettling them in the nation's heartland where they could grow and prosper as youngsters should, the story tacitly invokes some of the most potent of American myths-the Turner safety-valve theory, the Horatio Alger tale of the self-made person, and, more darkly, the lingering traces of Social Darwinism. The Orphan Trains strives to set the record straightnot to debunk the legend, but to give it its proper niche in western history ...


Review Of The Loner: Three Sketches Of The Personal Life And Ideas Of R. B. Bennett, 1870-1947 By P. B. Waite, Dale Jacobs Jan 1995

Review Of The Loner: Three Sketches Of The Personal Life And Ideas Of R. B. Bennett, 1870-1947 By P. B. Waite, Dale Jacobs

Great Plains Quarterly

The task of rehabilitating the reputation of former Canadian Prime Minister R. B. Bennett is a formidable one. Nevertheless, that is P. B. Waite's goal in The Loner, a set of three "sketches" of Bennett's life. Originally given as the Joanne Goodman Lectures at the University of Western Ontario in 1991, these sketches encompass Bennett's earliest years at Hopewell Cape and the Miramichi, his years as a lawyer and rising politician in Calgary, and his years in Ottawa. The Loner is not, however, another biography of R. B. Bennett, according to Waite, but an attempt to explain ...


Grasslands An Introduction, Kathleen H. Keeler Jan 1995

Grasslands An Introduction, Kathleen H. Keeler

Great Plains Quarterly

"Grasslands" was the subject of the seventeenth annual symposium of the Center for Great Plains Studies, held at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, in April 1994. Grasslands are so basic to the Great Plains experience as to be invisible. If you stand here in eastern Nebraska, it is so far in any direction across grasslands to any other landscape (a cornfield is a planted grassland, after all) that the role of grasslands in our lives does not seem worth considering. Local variation is much more visible. You can't see the prairie for the grasses, to adapt the idiom. And yet ...


Notes And News Jan 1995

Notes And News

Great Plains Quarterly

GREAT PLAINS STUDIES SYMPOSIA

CHEROKEE NATION PAPERS

CALLS FOR PAPERS

JOINT CONFERENCE


Table Of Contents Jan 1995

Table Of Contents

Great Plains Quarterly

GRASSLANDS: AN INTRODUCTION (Kathleen H. Keeler)

BLUESTEM AND TUSSOCK: FIRE AND PASTORALISM IN THE FLINT HILLS OF KANSAS AND THE TUSSOCK GRASSLANDS OF NEW ZEALAND (James F. Hoy; Thomas D. Isern)

NOT SO PLAIN: ART OF THE AMERICAN PRAIRIES (Joni L. Kinsey)

BOOK REVIEWS

The Wealth of Nature: Environmental History and the Ecological Imagination

The Prairie in Nineteenth-Century American Poetry

A Guide to Kansas Mushrooms

Into the Wilderness Dreams: Exploration Narratives of the American West, 1500-1805

What This Awl Means: Feminist Archaeology at a Wahpeton Dakota Village

Yanktonai Sioux Water Colors: Cultural Remembrances of John Saul

The Flag in American ...


Review Of Pioneer Woman Educator: The Progressive Spirit Of Annie Webb Blanton By Debbie Mauldin, Claudine Barnes Jan 1995

Review Of Pioneer Woman Educator: The Progressive Spirit Of Annie Webb Blanton By Debbie Mauldin, Claudine Barnes

Great Plains Quarterly

Debbie Mauldin Cottrell has written a meticulously researched biography of the first woman to hold statewide office in Texas. Serving as state superintendent of public instruction from 1918-22, as well as President of the Texas State Teachers Association, Vice-president of the National Education Association, and a professor of education at the University of Texas at Austin, Annie Webb Blanton focused her life's work on the reform of rural education. She also labored tirelessly to promote the advancement and equality of women throughout professional education. By building on their traditional role as teachers, she opened new opportunities for women.


Not So Plain Art Of The American Prairies, Joni L. Kinsey Jan 1995

Not So Plain Art Of The American Prairies, Joni L. Kinsey

Great Plains Quarterly

Since the first European encounters with the grasslands of central North America, beginning with Coronado in the mid-sixteenth century, prairies have alternately confused, dismayed, overwhelmed, depressed, and inspired those who would contend with their contradictions. They have been described as being both nothing and everything, empty as well as vast, monotonous and endlessly varied. For those who saw them in their pristine state, prairies were often disorienting, a place to be lost, whereas today they have become the "heartland" where Americans look to find their truest identity. While such disparities have frustrated many writers who have attempted to convey something ...


Review Of The Flag In American Indian Art By Toby Herbst And Joel Kopp, Russel Lawrence Barsh Jan 1995

Review Of The Flag In American Indian Art By Toby Herbst And Joel Kopp, Russel Lawrence Barsh

Great Plains Quarterly

The public appetite for American Indian crafts and artistic motifs can be traced back to the early part of this century, the same period of American cultural nativism that inspired the Arts and Crafts movement in midwestern industrial cities and a flight of young painters and sculptors to fledgling artists' colonies in the American Southwest. Before the Depression put an end to this bonanza for nativeborn talent, American Indians had been able to stake a large claim in media as diverse as miniature totem poles, beadwork, and basketry. While museums scoured the countryside for medicine bundles, pipes, and headdresses, the ...


Review Of The Political Economy Of North American Indians Edited By John H. Moore, Larry Burt Jan 1995

Review Of The Political Economy Of North American Indians Edited By John H. Moore, Larry Burt

Great Plains Quarterly

This book consists primarily of essays that were first delivered before the Twelfth International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences held in Zagreb, Yugoslavia, in 1988. Billed as Marxist in perspective, it seeks to show that Indian history should be seen more as economic conflict than cultural clash.

In the introductory piece the editor provides an excellent overview of the history of political economy in general and its use in anthropology in particular. The articles that follow vary widely in length, scope, and quality. All somehow explain the motivation behind governmental policy, as well as developments within Indian communities, as ...


Review Of Birger Sandzen: An Illustrated Biography By Emory Lindquist, Ann Davis Jan 1995

Review Of Birger Sandzen: An Illustrated Biography By Emory Lindquist, Ann Davis

Great Plains Quarterly

In Birger Sandzén Lindquist combines biography and art analysis. The first half of the book looks at Sandzen's early years and his decades at Bethany College. After a rich section of forty-nine color plates, the author turns to an examination of the influences on his painting, his methods, the response of art critics, the graphic work, and Sandzen's association with two friends as documented in correspondence. The overall result is a wellrounded picture of a positive adventurer, a regional painter whose work well deserves the recognition afforded it here.


Review Of A Generation Of Boomers: The Pattern Of Railroad Labor Conflict In Nineteenth-Century America By Shelton Stromquist, James W. Ely Jr. Jan 1995

Review Of A Generation Of Boomers: The Pattern Of Railroad Labor Conflict In Nineteenth-Century America By Shelton Stromquist, James W. Ely Jr.

Great Plains Quarterly

Stromquist concentrates on the western railroads, where labor conflict was most acute, saying little about eastern and southern lines. He perceptively treats the sometimes overlooked role of the railroads in promoting western settlement and in establishing a string of railroad towns to service trains. Carefully researched and persuasively argued, this volume would be of value to readers interested in railroad labor history, the settlement of the west, or the growth of industrial America.


Review Of Singing An Indian Song: A Biography Of D' Arcy Mcnickle By Dorothy R. Parker, Robert F. Gish Jan 1995

Review Of Singing An Indian Song: A Biography Of D' Arcy Mcnickle By Dorothy R. Parker, Robert F. Gish

Great Plains Quarterly

D'Arcy McNickle occupies a position of relatively minor but increasing stature in American Indian history and literature. Dorothy R. Parker's volume is thus a welcome addition to the increasing number of monographs, critical studies, and general commentaries about this ordinary but successful individual.

Modern biography is characterized by a fascination with people who, although notable, are seldom as illustrious and "famous" as the figures who traditionally engaged the attention of earlier, particularly nineteenth-century, biographers. In this sense, McNickle is clearly a modern subject; and reader interest in him, although keen among enthusiasts, will probably be limited.


Review Of Laura Ingalls Wilder's Little Town: Where History And Literature Meet By John E. Miller, William Holz Jan 1995

Review Of Laura Ingalls Wilder's Little Town: Where History And Literature Meet By John E. Miller, William Holz

Great Plains Quarterly

The Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder have many devoted readers, and the TV program based loosely on the books has generated many more enthusiasts who have never even read the books. One measure of such fans' interest has been their pilgrimages to the sites and settings of the books, and around these locations has grown up a considerable tourist industry of museums, pageants, and historical reconstruction. Here the faithful or the merely curious can find a certain kind of ratification of their fictional experience: the "fiction" is raised toward "history" and hence toward "truth" by conflating the stories ...


Review Of The Wealth Of Nature: Environmental History And The Ecological Imagination By Donald Worster, Andrew C. Isenberg Jan 1995

Review Of The Wealth Of Nature: Environmental History And The Ecological Imagination By Donald Worster, Andrew C. Isenberg

Great Plains Quarterly

On its surface, Donald Worster's collection of forceful and eloquent essays appears to revisit the subjects and themes he has explored in his previous books. There are sixteen essays in Wealth of Nature. The first three and the last one explore the concerns and practice of environmental history. Five essays investigate the ecological consequences of American agriculture, particularly in the Great Plains. Worster explored this subject in his Bancroft Prize-winning book, Dust Bowl. The next three essays primarily concern the economic and ecological irrationalities of irrigation in the West, a subject that Worster previously investigated in his book, Rivers ...


Review Of The Prairie In Nineteenth-Century American Poetry By Steven Olson, Mark Kamrath Jan 1995

Review Of The Prairie In Nineteenth-Century American Poetry By Steven Olson, Mark Kamrath

Great Plains Quarterly

The Prairie in Nineteenth-Century American Poetry is an important book about prairie and plains imagery in nineteenth-century American poetry. Situating his study among Henry Nash Smith's Virgin Land, Leo Marx's The Machine in the Garden, and Annette Kolodny's The Land Before Her, Olson argues that nineteenth- century American poets created a "new American poetry" (171) in the ways they describe the prairies and "symbolically incorporate people, imagination, ideology, and place in the United States" (vii).


Review Of Indian Water In The New West Edited By Thomas R. Mcguire, William B. Lord, And Mary G. Wallace, Lawrence C. Kelly Jan 1995

Review Of Indian Water In The New West Edited By Thomas R. Mcguire, William B. Lord, And Mary G. Wallace, Lawrence C. Kelly

Great Plains Quarterly

There is not enough space in this brief review to comment adequately upon the various papers. Both the dangers and the advantages of negotiated settlements are explicated in this timely addition to the literature which is highly recommended to students of American Indians, the West, and water resource management.