Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 30 of 2473

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Notes And News- Summer 2009 Jul 2009

Notes And News- Summer 2009

Great Plains Quarterly

DISSERTATION AWARD IN WOMEN'S HISTORY

CALL FOR PAPERS

CALL FOR PAPERS

CALL FOR PAPERS

VISITING SCHOLARS PROGRAM


Title And Contents- Summer 2009 Jul 2009

Title And Contents- Summer 2009

Great Plains Quarterly

GREAT PLAINS QUARTERLY

Volume 29/ Number 3 / Summer 2009

CONTENTS

CHANGING PERCEPTIONS OF HOMESTEADING AS A POLICY OF PUBLIC DOMAIN DISPOSAL

A PRAIRIE PARABLE: THE 1933 BATES TRAGEDY

CULTURAL SURVIVAL AND THE OMAHA WAY: SUMMER 2009 EUNICE WOODHULL STABLER'S LEGACY OF PRESERVATION ON THE TWENTIETH-CENTURY PLAINS

REVIEW ESSAY: THE HISTORIOGRAPHY OF A MOVING OBJECT: EMERGING UNDERSTANDINGS OF THE NORTH AMERICAN METIS

BOOK REVIEWS

NOTES AND NEWS


Book Notes- Spring 2009 Apr 2009

Book Notes- Spring 2009

Great Plains Quarterly

Prairies and Plains: The Reference Literature of a Region.

A Book of Photographs from Lonesome Dove

Fort Worth: A Personal View.

Traces of Forgotten Places: An Artist's ThirtyYear Exploration and Celebration of Texas, As It Was.

Bronze Inside and Out: A Biographical Memoir of Bob Scriver.

Wind Through the Buffalo Grass: A Lakota Story Cycle.

Outrider of Empire: The Life & Adventures of Roger Pocock, 1865-1941.

Powder River Odyssey: Nelson Cole's Western Campaign of 1865: The Journals of Lyman G. Bennett and Other Eyewitness Accounts.

Life of a Soldier on the Western Frontier

A Remarkable Curiosity: Dispatches from a ...


Title And Contents- Spring 2009 Apr 2009

Title And Contents- Spring 2009

Great Plains Quarterly

GREAT PLAINS QUARTERLY

Volume 29/Number 2/ Spring 2009

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION: DEATH, MURDER, AND MAYHEM: STORIES OF VIOLENCE AND HEALING ON THE PLAINS

DEATHSCAPES, TOPOCIDE, DOMICIDE: THE PLAINS IN CONTEMPORARY PRINT MEDIA

OPEN TO HORROR: THE GREAT PLAINS SITUATION IN CONTEMPORARY THRILLERS BY E. E. KNIGHT AND BY DOUGLAS PRESTON AND LINCOLN CHILD

CORONADO AND AESOP: FABLE AND VIOLENCE ON THE SIXTEENTH,CENTURY PLAINS

REVIEW ESSAY: NEW VIEWS ON CUSTER AND THE INDIAN WARS

BOOK REVIEWS

BOOK NOTES

NOTES AND NEWS


Review Of "Frontier Farewell: The 18705 And The End Of The Old West," By Garrett Wilson, Ted Binnema Jan 2009

Review Of "Frontier Farewell: The 18705 And The End Of The Old West," By Garrett Wilson, Ted Binnema

Great Plains Quarterly

You might just want to buy two copies-one for yourself, and one for a friend. This book by a Regina lawyer turned writer tells the story of the Canadian prairie West from the arrival of the first European explorers to 1881, although most of the book deals with the period beginning in 1869, and five of the twenty-two chapters deal with the events surrounding the time that Sitting Bull and several thousand other Sioux spent in Canada. The book was obviously written with a popular audience in mind, but it makes a significant contribution to scholarship on the history of ...


Review Of "This Land, This Nation: Conservation, Rural America, And The New Deal." By Sarah T. Phillips, Brian C. Cannon Jan 2009

Review Of "This Land, This Nation: Conservation, Rural America, And The New Deal." By Sarah T. Phillips, Brian C. Cannon

Great Plains Quarterly

In this sophisticated reinterpretation, Sarah T. Phillips traces the history and impact of New Deal conservation policy. She argues persuasively that rural conservation programs deserve a prominent place in New Deal historiography because they significantly shaped the New Deal state and because they were integral to the New Deal's campaign for economic recovery. Her work is sufficiently broad and innovative to invite criticism at multiple points on evidentiary grounds, but the book is consistently engaging.

Phillips shows that during the 1920s, eastern land use planners and politicians, along with progressives in the USDA, advocated planned and coordinated use of ...


Review Of "The Cypress Hills: An Island By Itself." By Walter Hildebrandt And Brian Hubner, George Colpitts Jan 2009

Review Of "The Cypress Hills: An Island By Itself." By Walter Hildebrandt And Brian Hubner, George Colpitts

Great Plains Quarterly

The Cypress Hills, rising as outliers in the northern portion of the Missouri Coteau and dominating the mixed xeric grasslands of southwestern Saskatchewan and southeastern Alberta, have a vast human story of their own. They are certainly worthy of their own history book. This new edition of Hildebrandt and Hubner's 1994 book has been "rewritten and reshaped" to retell the story of the prehistory, aboriginal, early trade, and mounted police history of the region. Originally serving as historians and guides of the Fort Walsh National Historic Site, the authors were well placed to provide it. The Cypress Hills presents ...


Review Of "Landscapes Of Colorado: Mountains And Plains." By Ann Scarlett Daley And Michael Paglia, Rose Glaser Fredrick Jan 2009

Review Of "Landscapes Of Colorado: Mountains And Plains." By Ann Scarlett Daley And Michael Paglia, Rose Glaser Fredrick

Great Plains Quarterly

Landscapes of Colorado: Mountains and Plains, with a historical overview by Ann Scarlett Daley, the book's curator, and text by Michael Paglia, is a handsome survey of contemporary landscape painters and photographers working in the state. One could argue with a choice here and there. For example, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, European installation artists who have lived in New York since 1964 and created just one major work for Colorado in 1972, Valley Curtain, Grand Hogback, with one more in the planning stages for 2011, are said to have "a long commitment to Colorado." Though their work is seminal, one ...


Review Of "Charles Goodnight: Father Of The Texas Panhandle," By William T. Hagan, West Texas A&M University Jan 2009

Review Of "Charles Goodnight: Father Of The Texas Panhandle," By William T. Hagan, West Texas A&M University

Great Plains Quarterly

In tackling Charles Goodnight, William Hagan successfully condenses an epic life story into a concise form-one of the requirements of University of Oklahoma Press's Western Biographies Series. Hagan's biography is wellpaced, smoothly written, and engaging. It's a story well told, but not a revisionist history. Even as he points out the way in which Goodnight has reached Western hero status, Hagan does not question or challenge the grand narrative of the pioneer West that provides the basis for Goodnight's iconic position.

In the course of telling Goodnight's story, however, Hagan corrects a number of legendary ...


Review Of "Cather Studies 7: Willa Cather As Cultural Icon," Edited By Guy Reynolds, Susan Kress Jan 2009

Review Of "Cather Studies 7: Willa Cather As Cultural Icon," Edited By Guy Reynolds, Susan Kress

Great Plains Quarterly

Since its founding in 1990, Cather Studies has offered seven occasions for the publication of a volume devoted to Willa Cather scholarship. Of late, the series's editors have focused on a theme; in volume 7, editor Guy Reynolds, director of the Cather Project at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, offers an introduction and twenty essays by both established Cather scholars and relative newcomers relating directly or indirectly to the matter of Willa Cather as cultural icon. Several essayists provide

Several essayists provide provocative definitions of what it means to have reached the status of icon. For Elsa Nettels, "Writers become ...


Review Of "So This Is The World & Here I Am In It," By Di Brandt, Tanis Macdonald Jan 2009

Review Of "So This Is The World & Here I Am In It," By Di Brandt, Tanis Macdonald

Great Plains Quarterly

When Di Brandt speaks about poetryand its political dimensions, people listen, sometimes with their mouths agape, at her audacity and at her long looping ecoerotic sentences. Brandt's literary, ecocritical, and philosophical stances are well represented in So this is the world, as are her poetics, emphasized here through her reading of the prairie as both aesthetic and consciousness, a local that has much to teach us about the global. The collection is bracketed by two luminous essays-"This land that I love, this wide, wide prairie" and the title essay, "So this is the world and here I am ...


Review Of "Buffalo Soldiers In The West: A Black Soldiers Anthology." Edited By Bruce A. Glasrud And Michael N. Searles, Dwayne Mack Jan 2009

Review Of "Buffalo Soldiers In The West: A Black Soldiers Anthology." Edited By Bruce A. Glasrud And Michael N. Searles, Dwayne Mack

Great Plains Quarterly

During the Civil War, some 180,000 African Americans served with courage in the Union Army, and more than 40,000 died. Following the war, as the United States moved to secure its Western territories, African American infantry and cavalry, whom the Cheyennes and Comanches of the Plains called "Buffalo Soldiers," helped in this endeavor. The Army Reorganization Act of 1866 approved the formation of the Ninth and Tenth Cavalry and Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth Infantry. In Buffalo Soldiers in the West, Bruce A. Glasrud and Michael N. Searles collect previously published essays on these intrepid servicemen. The collection describes how ...


Review Of "Nuclear Nebraska: The Remarkable Story Of The Little County That Couldn't Be Bought." By Susan Cragin., Francis Moul Jan 2009

Review Of "Nuclear Nebraska: The Remarkable Story Of The Little County That Couldn't Be Bought." By Susan Cragin., Francis Moul

Great Plains Quarterly

For nearly twenty-five years after Congress passed the 1980 Federal Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, Nebraska was torn by controversy over where a waste dump should be spotted in the state. The final act came in 2005, when Nebraska sent $146 million in damages to the five-state Central Compact Commission in charge of constructing the facility. Nothing was built.

Susan Cragin's book is a highly readable, well-researched, and very one-sided look at the uproar that cost all those millions of dollars, left a small Great Plains county irredeemably split, and caused years of newspaper headlines, angry meetings and hearings ...


Review Of "White Man's Paper Trail: Grand Councils And Treaty-Making On The Central Plains." By Stan Hoig, John R. Wunder Jan 2009

Review Of "White Man's Paper Trail: Grand Councils And Treaty-Making On The Central Plains." By Stan Hoig, John R. Wunder

Great Plains Quarterly

This is a strange book, in part because the author does not seem to recognize the massive amount of scholarship available on the topic of Indian treaties that has accumulated in the last thirty years. Mostly limited to works published before 1970, its bibliography highlights the problems arising from minimal familiarity with recent research.

The book itself claims to be a unique narrative about the treaty councils of the Central Plains. In reality, it is not unique, and its coverage spans an area from Texas to Montana. The Southern Plains are a particular emphasis and fit the author's expertise ...


Jim, Antonia, And The Wolves Displacement In Cather's My Antonia, Robin Cohen Jan 2009

Jim, Antonia, And The Wolves Displacement In Cather's My Antonia, Robin Cohen

Great Plains Quarterly

In one of the most frequently noted incidents in Willa Cather's My Antonia, Russian immigrant Pavel reveals on his deathbed that, when driving his friend's wedding party sledge, he saved his own life and companion Peter's by throwing the bride and groom to the attacking wolves. Antonia and Jim are fascinated by this story, and readers are haunted and intrigued by it. The tale holds the obvious appeal (both for the children and Cather's reader) of the drama of the incident, the color of its remote foreign setting, and the morbid satisfaction of learning the mysterious ...


Review Of "The Choctaws In Oklahoma: From Tribe To Nation, 1855-1970." By Clara Sue Kidwell, Robert Keith Collins Jan 2009

Review Of "The Choctaws In Oklahoma: From Tribe To Nation, 1855-1970." By Clara Sue Kidwell, Robert Keith Collins

Great Plains Quarterly

Scholars of anthropology (particularly historical anthropology), history, and Native American studies interested in Choctaw history, cultural changes, everyday life choices, and contributions to American culture should find The Choctaws in Oklahoma: From Tribe to Nation, 1855-1970 and How Choctaws Invented Civilization and Why Choctaws Will Conquer the World important new contributions to the historical literature articulated by strong Choctaw voices. And readers interested in the complexities of Choctaw life in the Southern Plains, how Choctaws interacted with the region's other Indigenous groups (e.g., Kiowas and Comanches), and the inconsistencies between federal policies and Choctaw lived realities over time ...


The Methodists' Great 1869 Camp Meeting And Aboriginal Conservation Strategies In The North Saskatchewan River Valley, George Colpitts Jan 2009

The Methodists' Great 1869 Camp Meeting And Aboriginal Conservation Strategies In The North Saskatchewan River Valley, George Colpitts

Great Plains Quarterly

George McDougall, chairman of the Methodist Missions to the Indians of the Northwest Territories, kept a large, black book in which he jotted sermon notes, references to classical and biblical literature and sometimes simply his itineraries by horseback from Victoria, the primary Methodist mission in the far British northwest. Under the "s" tab and labeled "Saskatchewan," he noted repeatedly in the 1860s the food crisis facing North Saskatchewan residents. In sum: ''A time of starvation. No buffalo."

In this article I analyze a buffalo hunt which occurred in 1869. That spring, many hundreds of Cree, Assiniboine, Stoney, and Metis hunters ...


Notes And News- Winter 2009 Jan 2009

Notes And News- Winter 2009

Great Plains Quarterly

CALL FOR PAPERS

VISITING SCHOLARS PROGRAM GRANTS

CALL FOR PAPERS

CENTER FOR GREAT PLAINS STUDIES CONFERENCE


Review Of "Playing Ourselves: Interpreting Native Histories At Historic Reconstructions." By Laura Peers, Sandra Dudley Jan 2009

Review Of "Playing Ourselves: Interpreting Native Histories At Historic Reconstructions." By Laura Peers, Sandra Dudley

Great Plains Quarterly

Based on research carried out over a decade into enactment at five North American reconstructed historic sites in the Great Plains and around the Great Lakes, this is essentially a book about encounters: encounters between Native interpreters and visitors at historic sites, of course-but also encounters between differing preconceptions of history, between ways of life, between people and things, and between the present and the past. Indeed, the chapters are interspersed with "vignettes" or snapshots of such encounters.

All the sites discussed in the book depict the people, activity, and material culture associated with missions and fur trading. They were ...


Review Of "Mary Martin, Broadway Legend." By Ronald L. Davis, John M. Clum Jan 2009

Review Of "Mary Martin, Broadway Legend." By Ronald L. Davis, John M. Clum

Great Plains Quarterly

Mary Martin has not been as well treated in biographies as her sometime colleague Ethel Merman, the subject of two fine books in the past year. So Ronald L. Davis's volume is a welcome addition to lore about the stars of the Golden Age of the Broadway Musical.

Ronald Davis got interested in Martin in part because of her Texas connections {she was born and raised in Weatherford, Texas}. A historian with interests in oral history and show business {he has written books on John Wayne, John Ford, and Linda Darnell}, Davis interviewed Martin before her death as well ...


Review Of Willie Wells: "Ei Diablo" Of The Negro Leagues, By Bob Luke, Leslie Heaphy Jan 2009

Review Of Willie Wells: "Ei Diablo" Of The Negro Leagues, By Bob Luke, Leslie Heaphy

Great Plains Quarterly

Bob Luke introduces readers to Willie Wells the man as well as Willie Wells the ball player. Wells's life is placed in the larger context of where he came from in Texas as well as what was happening in America during and after his baseball career ended. To tell his story Luke relies on primary sources as much as possible. Interviews and Wells's own letters are nicely woven throughout the text, giving readers an immediate feel for Wells as a person.

After presenting Wells the player and family man, Luke offers a discussion of the long road to ...


Review Of Women In Texas Music: Stories And Songs By Kathleen Hudson, Gail Folkins Jan 2009

Review Of Women In Texas Music: Stories And Songs By Kathleen Hudson, Gail Folkins

Great Plains Quarterly

Women musicians take center stage in Women in Texas Music, from the gender barriers they've broken as performers and artists to the growing recognition and musical territory they claim. Through a series of personal interviews, Kathleen Hudson depicts more than thirty women musicians' journeys in Texas, the Southwest, and in many cases beyond. The author's lively exchange with songwriters and performers invites readers deeper into the conversation, as if they've snuck backstage themselves to listen in.

One of the more engaging themes in Women in Texas Music is the various paths traveled by these artists, each road ...


Review Of The Painted Valley: Artists Along Alberta's Bow River, 1845-2000, By Christopher Armstrong And H. V. Nelles, Mary-Beth Laviolette Jan 2009

Review Of The Painted Valley: Artists Along Alberta's Bow River, 1845-2000, By Christopher Armstrong And H. V. Nelles, Mary-Beth Laviolette

Great Plains Quarterly

As books about art go, The Painted Valley is an unusual undertaking because neither Christopher Armstrong nor H. V. Nelles is a specialist in the field of Canadian art. Both emeritus professors at Toronto's York University, they are environmental historians who, in the process of researching a book about southern Alberta's 600-kilometer-Iong Bow River, "stumbled" upon a "cache of pictures" inspired by that stony ribbon of blue: paintings, photographs, and works on paper found largely in the collections of Calgary's Glenbow Museum, Banff's Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies, and the Edmontonbased Alberta Foundation for the ...


Review Of Medicine Bundle: Indian Sacred Performance And American Literature, 1824-1932, By Joshua David Bellin, Edward W. Huffstetler Jan 2009

Review Of Medicine Bundle: Indian Sacred Performance And American Literature, 1824-1932, By Joshua David Bellin, Edward W. Huffstetler

Great Plains Quarterly

The central metaphor of Joshua David Bellin's study is an intriguing one, that the BOOK REVIEWS 157 interaction between "sacred performance by Indians and the performance of Indianness by Indians and whites alike" functions as a kind of cross-cultural repository, or Amedicine bundle," for the emerging America of the nineteenth century. His argument, in a nutshell, is that the co-opting of Indian sacred performance by the dominant white culture has shaped the evolution of both Indian and white notions of spirituality and cultural identity these performances help create. And while this is unquestionably true, the argument in the end ...


Review Of Native America, Discovered And Conquered: Thomas Jefferson, Lewis & Clark, And Manifest Destiny. By Robert J. Miller, Jenry Morsman Jan 2009

Review Of Native America, Discovered And Conquered: Thomas Jefferson, Lewis & Clark, And Manifest Destiny. By Robert J. Miller, Jenry Morsman

Great Plains Quarterly

In recent decades, scholars have reshaped our understanding of conquest, and as a result the idea of conquest is an unsettling one. Robert J. Miller's original and important work should launch a similar transformation for the idea of discovery. Associate Professor at the Lewis & Clark Law School and Chief Justice, Court of Appeals, Confederated Tribes of the Grande Ronde Community of Oregon, Miller persuasively argues that the principle of international law known as the Doctrine of Discovery provided the legal rationale and framework for the westward expansion of the United States. It, too, he argues, accounts for the troubling ...


Review Of The Cherokee Nation And The Trail Of Tears. By Theda Perdue And Michael D. Green, Rowena Mcclinton Jan 2009

Review Of The Cherokee Nation And The Trail Of Tears. By Theda Perdue And Michael D. Green, Rowena Mcclinton

Great Plains Quarterly

Past chief of the Cherokee Nation (1985- 1995) and social activist Wilma Mankiller remarked, "We are still here." Facing rampant racism, a fraudulent treaty, and then dislocation from their homelands in the southeast, Cherokees not only survived but prevailed. Reflectively, Theda Perdue and Michael Green have summarized the complexity and cunning complicity surrounding the 1838-39 infamous Cherokee displacement known as the Trail of Tears, adding to the scholarship of Tim Garrison, Gary Moulton, Walter Conser, Mary Young, and the late William G. McLoughlin.

They juxtapose the remarkable lives of two adversarial Cherokee figures, Major Ridge (along with his son John ...


Review Of Cree Narrative Memory: From Treaties To Contemporary Times. By Neal Mcleod, Bret Nickels Jan 2009

Review Of Cree Narrative Memory: From Treaties To Contemporary Times. By Neal Mcleod, Bret Nickels

Great Plains Quarterly

Within contemporary Aboriginal discourse, there is a growing tendency to ignore the multilayered histories of various Aboriginal communities in favor of a more simplified discourse based on tribal specific nationalism. Cree Narrative Memory, an important new book, ignores this movement towards essentialism and tackles the multilayered histories of the nehiyawak (Cree People) of western Canada. The author contributes a detailed, visionary study of Cree discourse, exploring the little considered ambiguous genealogy and narrative irony of Plains Cree identity, a central factor in the book's fresh perspectives, analysis, and conclusions.

Though many books draw upon oral history and storytelling, few ...


Review Of Defamiliarizing The Aboriginal: Cultural Practices And Decolonization In Canada. By Julia V. Emberley., Laura Peers Jan 2009

Review Of Defamiliarizing The Aboriginal: Cultural Practices And Decolonization In Canada. By Julia V. Emberley., Laura Peers

Great Plains Quarterly

This book examines how "representational technologies," including photography and archival material, were used to establish colonial control over Aboriginal families in Canada. Case studies include a critique of photographer Mary Schaffer's images of Aboriginal people in the Rocky Mountains, an analysis of an RCMP file concerning the disappearance of an Inuit woman and children, and a discussion of prairie writer Rudy Wiebe's retelling of Yvonne Johnson's life. Defamiliarizing the Aboriginal is a subtle addition to literature on the mechanisms of cultural representation and their dynamics within colonialism, placing these issues especially well within the framework of postcolonial ...


Review Of Violence, The Arts, And Willa Cather. Edited By Joseph R. Urgo And Merrill Maguire Skaggs, Karsten H. Piep Jan 2009

Review Of Violence, The Arts, And Willa Cather. Edited By Joseph R. Urgo And Merrill Maguire Skaggs, Karsten H. Piep

Great Plains Quarterly

This compilation of twenty-three essays proves that contemporary scholarship has moved beyond trite debates about Cather's alleged propensity to romanticize violence. Accordingly, the volume's editors have assembled a series of nuanced readings that reconsider Willa Cather's artistic uses of violence as well as her appropriations of various art forms before the backdrop of World War I, modernist aesthetics, Nativism, and 1920s feminism. Approaching their subject through the lenses of biographical, historical, aesthetic, psychoanalytical, and gender criticism, the contributors paint Cather as a sometimes generous, sometimes severe critic of American culture, whose insistence on the inescapability of violence ...


Review Of William F. Cody's Wyoming Empire: The Buffalo Bill Nobody Knows. By Robert E. Bonner, Jack R. Preston Jan 2009

Review Of William F. Cody's Wyoming Empire: The Buffalo Bill Nobody Knows. By Robert E. Bonner, Jack R. Preston

Great Plains Quarterly

Robert Bonner's book provides wonderful insight into Cody's promotional activities outside of Madison Square Garden. The tale of his sponsorship of the Shoshone irrigation projects and the formation of the town of Cody aptly illustrates that even in the business world William Cody was still the showman promoter.

The book is very well documented, based on an abundance of correspondence found in the files of the participants of the Shoshone project. It tells how Cody, always the man in charge, badgered, cajoled, and saw things through rose-colored glasses. He used his power and "vision" on his friends and ...