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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Selected Works

2009

Articles

Neophytos Loizides

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

The Presidential Election In Cyprus, February 2008, Neophytos Loizides Feb 2009

The Presidential Election In Cyprus, February 2008, Neophytos Loizides

Neophytos Loizides

A two-round presidential election was held in Cyprus on February 17 and February 24, 2008. The election was the first to take place after the country’s accession to the European Union and the abortive UN-planned referendum on reunification in 2004. It was also the first to be contended and won by a leader of AKEL, the communist party of Cyprus. The 2008 election took place in a highly politicized environment, in the midst of concern over the future of bicommunal negotiations. Incumbent President Tassos Papadopoulos rallied the nationalist vote against his moderate rivals Ioannis Kasoulides from centre right DISY ...


Religious Nationalism And Adaptation In Southeast Europe, Neophytos Loizides Feb 2009

Religious Nationalism And Adaptation In Southeast Europe, Neophytos Loizides

Neophytos Loizides

Relating nationalism to other ideologies or cultural values is one of the most enigmatic scholarly activities. The enigma lies in the kaleidoscopic nature of nationalism and the ease with which it adapts or relates to philosophically opposed ideologies (Hutchinson & Smith, 1994, 3). For example, nationalism often assumes ties to liberalism, even though it presupposes a strong commitment to the national community that transcends individualism. It accommodates conservatism fairly well despite nationalism’s modernizing mission, and it has often been paired with communism, despite the latter’s internationalist rhetoric. More surprisingly, nationalism and religion often go hand in hand, despite their deep philosophical inconsistencies. Nationalism is inherently local, philosophically poor, and limited and it lacks the belief in afterlife salvation and creative intelligence as source of meaning behind the universe (Anderson, 1983; Greenfeld, 1996b). Yet it frequently relates to religions such as Christianity and Islam which are universal in their membership and message of salvation. The article examines the latter relationship, namely that of nationalism and religion, through evidence from Southeast Europe in the past three centuries. It identifies religious and linguistic cleavages as alternative sources of identity construction and points to the ...