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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Interactive Australia 2007 : Facts About The Australian Computer And Video Game Industry, Jeffrey Brand Feb 2009

Interactive Australia 2007 : Facts About The Australian Computer And Video Game Industry, Jeffrey Brand

Jeffrey Brand

Interactive Australia 2007 provides data on who is playing games in Australia, what their attitudes and behaviours are like compared with non-gamers, the nature of the games market, the importance of games in the family experience and the role of online access in game purchasing and play. The study is based on a national random sample of 1,606 Australian households who responded to more than 75 questions and over 300 data points in a 15-minute online survey run by ACNielsen Surveys Australia in late September 2006. Two units of analysis are explored in the study: the household and the ...


Community Embeddedness And The Diffusion Of Local News, Bradley Greenberg, Walter Gantz, Jeffrey Brand Feb 2009

Community Embeddedness And The Diffusion Of Local News, Bradley Greenberg, Walter Gantz, Jeffrey Brand

Jeffrey Brand

Richard F. Carter was involved in the development of the communication field almost from the beginning. Most closely associated with the mass communication tradition, he has nevertheless become a source of theoretical and methodological illumination for scholars in widely disparate areas. This book brings together 15 exemplar chapters illustrating the applications of Carter's work to specific avenues of scholarship and 23 commentaries that focus on Carter's academic life in the context of the communication field's history. The volume includes a chronology of Carter's professional life and a bibliography of his works; it concludes with an original ...


Connecting Diversity: Paradoxes Of Multicultural Australia, Ien Ang, Jeffrey E. Brand, Greg Noble, Jason Sternberg Feb 2009

Connecting Diversity: Paradoxes Of Multicultural Australia, Ien Ang, Jeffrey E. Brand, Greg Noble, Jason Sternberg

Jeffrey Brand

Commissioned by SBS, and published in March 2006, Connecting Diversity: Paradoxes of Multicultural Australia is a follow-up study to SBS’s 2002 report, Living Diversity: Australia’s Multicultural Future. The attitudes of many younger Australians from culturally diverse backgrounds reveal paradoxes about Australian multiculturalism today. This report sheds light on their views, experiences and expectations and the role of media in their lives. Younger, culturally and linguistically diverse Australians are often the subject of mediafanned controversy about disaffection, ‘ethnic gangs’ and cultural isolation. While these controversies tend to be localised – Cronulla, Inala or Bankstown – Connecting Diversity tells a national and ...


Information And Communication Technologies, Jeffrey Brand, S. Roald Feb 2009

Information And Communication Technologies, Jeffrey Brand, S. Roald

Jeffrey Brand

This widely used Australian introduction to theory and professional practice has been fully revised and includes new chapters on ethics and public relations in the Third Sector. Leading practitioners and lecturers outline the core principles of public relations in both the public and private sectors. They show how to develop effective public relations strategies and tactics and explain how to research, run and evaluate a successful public relations campaign. Drawing on a range of communication and public relations theories they discuss how to work with the media and how to use print, electronic and other forms of communication for maximum ...


Representations Of Alana In Computer And Video Games, Jeffrey Brand, Jakub Majewski, Scott Knight Feb 2009

Representations Of Alana In Computer And Video Games, Jeffrey Brand, Jakub Majewski, Scott Knight

Jeffrey Brand

A new way to view race in media is presented in a nuanced picture that sometimes defies simple racial dichotomies. It explores the racial characterization of the heroes and she-roes of various video games. The potential for more balanced and fair representations of ALANA [African, Latin, Asian, Native American] is perhaps greater in CVG's [computer and video games] than in the traditional media. However, only small advances have been made in offering choice and a range of character roles for ALANA while eschewing traditional media stereotypes.


Don't Criticise The Effects Of Video Games On Kids, Exploit Them!, Jeffrey E. Brand Feb 2009

Don't Criticise The Effects Of Video Games On Kids, Exploit Them!, Jeffrey E. Brand

Jeffrey Brand

[Extract] For young learners today, video games are part of the "cultural furniture". The development of boys and girls, their socialisation, and their formal learning (including literacy) are at risk if they reject contemporary media. What humanises technology most completely is appropriation of it. As any parent or teacher who has tried it knows, using popular media in the service of formal learning most readily overcomes the risk attributed to them. It also eliminates the source of moral panics: ignorance about the learners' world.


Living Diversity: Australia’S Multicultural Future, Ien Ang, Jeffrey E. Brand, Greg Noble, Derek Wilding Feb 2009

Living Diversity: Australia’S Multicultural Future, Ien Ang, Jeffrey E. Brand, Greg Noble, Derek Wilding

Jeffrey Brand

In 2002, SBS commissioned research into trends in multicultural Australia. This study gives us a glimpse of the ‘diversity within diversity’of Australians’engagement with multiculturalism, their senses of identity and belonging, the ways in which they engage with others of different backgrounds, and their uses of media in a multicultural society. The overall picture is one of a fluid, plural and complex society, with a majority of the population positively accepting of the cultural diversity that is an increasingly routine part of Australian life, although a third is still uncertain or ambivalent about cultural diversity. In practice, most Australians ...


The Newsroom Versus The Lounge Room: Journalists’ And Audiences’ Views On News, Jeffrey Brand, Mark Pearson Feb 2009

The Newsroom Versus The Lounge Room: Journalists’ And Audiences’ Views On News, Jeffrey Brand, Mark Pearson

Jeffrey Brand

In May 2001 the Australian Broadcasting Authority released the authors' report titled Sources of News and Current Affairs (ABA, 2001). The monograph consisted of reports from the Stage I study of journalists' views (Pearson & Brand, 2001) and the Stage 2 study of audiences' views (Brand, Archhold & Rane, 2001). These were independent publications focusing on the individual results from each stage of the larger study. Little comparison was made between the journalists' and audiences' views in the two reports. This paper provides a comparison and contrast of the views of news and current affairs producers and their audiences. The comparative analysis covers a range of topics including characteristics and attitudes; news and current affairs media credibility; news quality (particularly issues of sensationalism, inrusiveness, bias, and inaccuracy); influences upon news and current affairs; adequacy of local coverage; and attitudes to contemporary social issues. The authors found that journalists and their audiences are different, demographically; they are different in their views on the credibility of the news product; they are different in their perceptions of the quality of ...


Informing Our Own Choices: A Proposal For User-Generated Classification, Jeffrey Brand, Mark Finn Dec 2008

Informing Our Own Choices: A Proposal For User-Generated Classification, Jeffrey Brand, Mark Finn

Jeffrey Brand

New media are distrusted media, and computer games are the contemporary currency in new media. Computer game content, like other popular media content, is regulated in different jurisdictions by one of three general models: the open market in which consumption decides the availability of product, industry self-regulation in which industry bodies decide, and government regulation in which government or quasi-governmental bodies decide. Arguably, these models represent the twentieth century state of the art and fail to keep pace with changes in the aesthetics and technologies associated with interactive entertainment. In a networked economy, alternative models exist to serve content gatekeeping ...