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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Selected Works

2009

Geography

Dry ashing

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

A Microwave Digestion Method For The Extraction Of Phytoliths From Herbarium Specimens, Jeffrey Parr, V Dolic, Graham Lancaster, William Boyd Jul 2009

A Microwave Digestion Method For The Extraction Of Phytoliths From Herbarium Specimens, Jeffrey Parr, V Dolic, Graham Lancaster, William Boyd

Jeffrey Parr

The extraction of phytoliths from herbarium and/or fresh plant material to obtain a suite of comparative reference samples is an essential component of palaeobotanical studies for the accurate interpretation of fossil phytolith assemblages. A number of established methods have been employed to extract phytoliths from plant material including dry ashing and acid digestion. However, while these methods produce good results, they can be time consuming and have the potential to produce results with some cross-contamination if not monitored closely. In this study, we trial an alternative method using microwave digestion, and compare the results to those produced using a ...


A Comparative Analysis Of Wet And Dry Ashing Techniques For The Extraction Of Phytoliths From Plant Material, Jeffrey Parr, Carol Lentfer, William Boyd Jul 2009

A Comparative Analysis Of Wet And Dry Ashing Techniques For The Extraction Of Phytoliths From Plant Material, Jeffrey Parr, Carol Lentfer, William Boyd

Jeffrey Parr

Two methods are commonly used for the extraction of phytoliths from plant material to be used as reference in the analysis of archaeological phytolith samples: (1) spodograms or dry ashings; and (2) acid digestions or wet ashing. It has been suggested that these techniques may modify the resultant samples in different ways. Dry ashing, in particular, has been implicated as a cause of shrinkage and warping in phytolith assemblages when incineration occurs at ≥450°C. The results of a morphometric comparative analysis between the dry ashing and wet ashing methods do not support these claims. This study establishes that differences ...