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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

From Food Desert To Food Mirage: Race, Social Class, And Food Shopping In A Gentrifying Neighborhood, Daniel Monroe Sullivan Jan 2014

From Food Desert To Food Mirage: Race, Social Class, And Food Shopping In A Gentrifying Neighborhood, Daniel Monroe Sullivan

Sociology Faculty Publications and Presentations

New supermarkets in previous “food deserts” can benefit residents by improving their access to healthful, affordable food. But in gentrifying neighborhoods characterized by the inflow of middle-class, white residents and the outflow of working class, minorities, who benefits from a new supermarket that emphasizes organic food and environmental sustainability? This paper contributes to the food access literature by examining the food shopping behavior of diverse residents by using survey data and probability sampling in the Alberta neighborhood in Portland, Oregon (USA). Regression results show that college-educated (62%) and white residents (60%) are much more likely to shop there weekly, regardless ...


Region-Urbanicity Differences In Locus Of Control: Social Disadvantage, Structure, Or Cultural Exceptionalism?, Dara Shifrer, April Sutton Jan 2014

Region-Urbanicity Differences In Locus Of Control: Social Disadvantage, Structure, Or Cultural Exceptionalism?, Dara Shifrer, April Sutton

Sociology Faculty Publications and Presentations

People with internal rather than external locus of control experience better outcomes in multiple domains. Previous studies on spatial differences in control within America only focused on the South, relied on aggregate level data or historical evidence, or did not account for other confounding regional distinctions (such as variation in urbanicity). Using data from the National Education Longitudinal Study, we find differences in adolescents' loci of control depending on their region and urbanicity are largely attributable to differences in their social background, and only minimally to structural differences (i.e., differences in the qualities of adolescents' schools). Differences that persist ...


The Impact Of Adolescent Neighborhood And School Context On Asian And Latino Young Adults’ Native Language Use With Family, Lindsey Wilkinson Jan 2009

The Impact Of Adolescent Neighborhood And School Context On Asian And Latino Young Adults’ Native Language Use With Family, Lindsey Wilkinson

Sociology Faculty Publications and Presentations

While opponents of immigration often claim that the new immigrants are failing to learn English and thus to assimilate, a growing body of research suggests otherwise. In fact, Anglicization, or loss of mother tongue, is occurring at a rapid rate across all groups of new immigrants (Alba et al. 2002; Lopez 1999; Portes and Hao 1998; Veltman 1983) and continues to follow the three generation pattern observed among earlier waves of European immigrants (Fishman 1965). However, there is evidence that this shift is occurring more rapidly for Asian immigrants than for Latinos (Alba et al. 2002; Lopez 1999), due in ...