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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

What Is Globalization To Post-Colonialism? An Apologia For African Literature, Ameh Dennis Akoh Jun 2010

What Is Globalization To Post-Colonialism? An Apologia For African Literature, Ameh Dennis Akoh

Journal of Global Initiatives: Policy, Pedagogy, Perspective

Globalization is easily understood as part of the continuing history of imperialism, indeed, of capitalist development and expansion. Have the imperial structures really been dismantled, even though the empire, free as they politically seem after independence, still writes back to the (imperial) center? This paper probes into the angelic posture that globalization seems to assume in its tackling of these complexities of identities. In this age of the clamor for national literatures and criticism, which is a fundamental principle of postcolonial literatures, will globalization automatically erode the idea of a postcolonial world and literatures? Is post-colonialism in its present phase ...


Macon State Showcases 'Lost' Literature Oct 2009

Macon State Showcases 'Lost' Literature

Georgia Library Quarterly

The article reviews the literature exhibit "Lost" at the Macon State College's library in Georgia.


"The Future Good And Great Of Our Land": Republican Mothers, Female Authors, And Domesticated Literacy In Antebellum New England, Sarah Robbins Dec 2002

"The Future Good And Great Of Our Land": Republican Mothers, Female Authors, And Domesticated Literacy In Antebellum New England, Sarah Robbins

Faculty Publications

In an 1830s review of Lydia Maria Child's Good Wives published in Sarah Hale's Ladies' Magazine, the enthusiastic commentator quoted above sets Child's latest book within a thriving literary culture that values didactic literature. Acknowledging the importance of a genre I call the domestic literacy narrative, the reviewer confidently asserts that "the prevalent rage for reading" promises to promote not only familial but national well-being-promises, that is, if more books like Child's are regularly published to help train women to direct their family's reading and extract from it principles and behaviors consonant with their country ...