Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 13 of 13

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Prehispanic Use Of Chili Peppers In Chiapas, Mexico, Terry G. Powis, Emiliano Gallaga Murrieta, Richard Lesure, Roberto Lopez Bravo, Louis Grivetti, Heidi Kucera, Nilesh W. Gaikwad Nov 2013

Prehispanic Use Of Chili Peppers In Chiapas, Mexico, Terry G. Powis, Emiliano Gallaga Murrieta, Richard Lesure, Roberto Lopez Bravo, Louis Grivetti, Heidi Kucera, Nilesh W. Gaikwad

Faculty Publications

The genus Capsicum is New World in origin and represents a complex of a wide variety of both wild and domesticated taxa. Peppers or fruits of Capsicum species rarely have been identified in the paleoethnobotanical record in either Meso- or South America. We report here confirmation of Capsicum sp. residues from pottery samples excavated at Chiapa de Corzo in southern Mexico dated from Middle to Late Preclassic periods (400 BCE to 300 CE). Residues from 13 different pottery types were collected and extracted using standard techniques. Presence of Capsicum was confirmed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)/MS-MS Analysis. Five pottery ...


2008 Field Excavation Final Report Acosta-Durst-Taylor House, Leslie G. Cecil Jul 2013

2008 Field Excavation Final Report Acosta-Durst-Taylor House, Leslie G. Cecil

Faculty Publications

The Acosta-Durst-Taylor site (now known as the Durst-Taylor House) is known as one of the earliest occupations in Nacogdoches, TX. The property fronts North Street and is just to the north of Hospital Street (Figure 1). Much of the history of this plot of land and accompanying house, out structures, and other buildings associated with this land is described thoroughly in the site’s National Register of Historic Places nomination form (United States Department of the Interior 2003). What follows is a brief synopsis of the changing landscape of site 41NA182.


Savage Minds Interview: Kristina Killgrove, Ryan B. Anderson Jun 2013

Savage Minds Interview: Kristina Killgrove, Ryan B. Anderson

Faculty Publications

Kristina Killgrove is a biological anthropologist at the University of West Florida. Her research focuses on theorizing migration in antiquity and on understanding urban development and collapse through the analysis of human skeletal remains. She works primarily in the classical world, attempting to learn about the daily lives of the lower classes in Imperial Rome through osteological and biochemical analyses, but she has also worked on questions of population interaction in the contact-period southeastern U.S.and in Medieval Germany. A strong commitment to interdisciplinary research and teaching help her bridge the sometimes large divide between classics and anthropology.For ...


All In The Junkab'al: The House In Q'Eqchi' Society, Ashley Kistler Jun 2013

All In The Junkab'al: The House In Q'Eqchi' Society, Ashley Kistler

Faculty Publications

Recent studies examine how individuals create kinship through economic transactions, ritual, and religion. This paper explores how Q’eqchi’ women in San Juan Chamelco, Guatemala generate the logics of kinship through marketing. In Chamelco, the Q’eqchi’ construct kinship through the local category of the junkab’al, ‘family’, literally ‘one home’. Members of Q’eqchi’ junkab’als create the substance of kinship through shared residence and participation in daily life. Chamelco’s women use marketing to establish kinship, incorporating market employees into their junkab’als. Since market positions have been passed down in junkab’als for generations and constitute the ...


Savage Minds Interview: Sarah Kendzior, Ryan B. Anderson May 2013

Savage Minds Interview: Sarah Kendzior, Ryan B. Anderson

Faculty Publications

Sarah Kendzior is a writer for Al Jazeera English. She has a PhD in cultural anthropology from Washington University and researches the political effects of digital media in the former USSR. You can find her work at sarahkendzior.com,and on Twitter: @sarahkendzior


Cultures In Contact At Colony Ross, Kent G. Lightfoot, Sara Gonzalez, Darren Modzelewski, Lee M. Panich, Otis Parrish, Tsim Schneider Feb 2013

Cultures In Contact At Colony Ross, Kent G. Lightfoot, Sara Gonzalez, Darren Modzelewski, Lee M. Panich, Otis Parrish, Tsim Schneider

Faculty Publications

For thousands of years before the coming of Europeans, Kashaya Pomo and Coast Miwok peoples inhabited the coastal lands north of San Francisco Bay. Like many other California Indians, they were hunter-gatherers who harvested wild plants and animals from the sea and land for food, medicine, clothing, housing material, and ceremonial regalia. Villages nestled along protected coastal embayments and ridge tops of the Northern Coast Ranges mountains contained tule-thatched or redwood bark houses, ceremonial structures (round houses), sweat houses, dance enclosures, and extramural cooking and work areas. Large villages served as the political centers for broader communities of dispersed family ...


Speaking Politely, Kindly, And Beautifully: Ideologies Of Politeness In Japanese Business Etiquette Training, Cynthia Dickel Dunn Feb 2013

Speaking Politely, Kindly, And Beautifully: Ideologies Of Politeness In Japanese Business Etiquette Training, Cynthia Dickel Dunn

Faculty Publications

In recent years, politeness theory has increasingly focused on speakers’ own conceptualizations of polite behavior, viewing politeness concepts as a type of language ideology. This article examines the construction of Japanese politeness concepts in the business etiquette training provided for new employees in Japanese companies. Drawing on participant-observation of business etiquette seminars offered by five training companies, it analyzes how employees are taught to show deference through appropriate honorific use, to speak in ways which are seen as kind or considerate, and to speak and move in ways the instructors define as ‘beautiful.’ The analysis demonstrates how etiquette training conflates ...


Imagining The Swamp Fox: William Gilmore Simms And The National Memory Of Francis Marion, Steven D. Smith Jan 2013

Imagining The Swamp Fox: William Gilmore Simms And The National Memory Of Francis Marion, Steven D. Smith

Faculty Publications

William Gilmore Simms's Unfinished Civil War measures the effects of the Civil War and its aftermath on one of the Old South's foremost intellectuals. Simms's mid-nineteenth-century poems, novels, and essays and the personal and societal trauma and destruction Simms experienced are all portrayed here. This collection of essays by historians and literary scholars first explores William Gilmore Simms's antebellum treatment of the role of warfare in America's past and the South's future. The contributors then consider the impact of the secession crisis, the Civil War, and the Confederate defeat on Simms's and other ...


Recasting The Agency Of Unaccompanied Youth, Lauren Heidbrink Jan 2013

Recasting The Agency Of Unaccompanied Youth, Lauren Heidbrink

Faculty Publications

This is Chapter 6 of Emerging Perspectives on Children in Migratory Circumstances: Selected Proceedings of the Working Group on Childhood and Migration June 2008 Conference, published by Drexel University Department of Culture & Communication. Click for full-text.

Excerpt from the book abstract:

Most of the pieces provide in depth points of view from child migrant perspectives—data that is often difficult to obtain and portray sensitively. Child-centered data is exceptionally valuable in helping us to grasp the micro-forces by which childhood is changing through migration and how children experience or activate agency under trying conditions...Lauren Heidbrink [discusses] Spanish speakers in ...


Flirting With Conversion: Negotiating Researcher Non-Belief With Missionaries, Hillary K. Crane Jan 2013

Flirting With Conversion: Negotiating Researcher Non-Belief With Missionaries, Hillary K. Crane

Faculty Publications

This article discusses Crane’s research in a Taiwanese Buddhist monastery. Crane came to the field as a former Catholic, which provided a particular lens through which to perceive the phenomena she researched. Beyond the difficulties of having one's research interests misinterpreted by the community one is researching and the ambiguities that result from remaining open to conversion when studying religious communities, Crane examines the further difficulty confronted when researching religious personnel who have an interest in representing their religious ideals both to and through the researcher. The article examines Crane’s time in the Buddhist monastery and explores ...


New Mexico's Spanish Livestock Heritage: Four Centuries Of Animals, Land, And People., Andrew Sluyter Jan 2013

New Mexico's Spanish Livestock Heritage: Four Centuries Of Animals, Land, And People., Andrew Sluyter

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


History Of The Non-Spanish Antilles, Andrew Sluyter Jan 2013

History Of The Non-Spanish Antilles, Andrew Sluyter

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Forgotten Farmworkers Of Apopka, Florida: Prospects For Collaborative Research And Activism To Assist African-American Former Farmworkers, Rachel Newcomb Jan 2013

The Forgotten Farmworkers Of Apopka, Florida: Prospects For Collaborative Research And Activism To Assist African-American Former Farmworkers, Rachel Newcomb

Faculty Publications

Anthropology’s crisis of representation of the 1980s has given way to a millennial crisis of involvement. As neoliberal policies proliferate and intensify wealth and social inequalities, anthropologists have considered ways to conduct engaged research that can contribute to social justice. One possibility is the prospect of collaboration between anthropologists and activists. In this article we examine our own collaborative research with an anthropologist and activist organization. We highlight benefits of long-term community engagement projects for activist-oriented community partners and students.