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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

The Life-Giving Stone: Ethnoarchaeology Of Maya Metates [Review], Jennifer P. Mathews Oct 2013

The Life-Giving Stone: Ethnoarchaeology Of Maya Metates [Review], Jennifer P. Mathews

Sociology & Anthropology Faculty Research

This volume attempts to get at the interpretations of the archaeological record from the back-end by studying the modern Maya metate life cycle, including procurement, production, acquisition, use and discard. The author spent two years in Guatemala conducting ethnographic research with metate producers and users in three Maya communities. It is through this rich research that he greatly expands our understanding of metates by providing background of their complexity through several avenues. For example, he documents contemporary gifting traditions, noting that families still give metates as wedding gifts to couples, even as their use decreases with the presence of electric ...


Introduction: Indigenous Creolization, Amerindian Hybridity And The Invention Of Authenticity, Ernst Halbmayer, Catherine Alès Jun 2013

Introduction: Indigenous Creolization, Amerindian Hybridity And The Invention Of Authenticity, Ernst Halbmayer, Catherine Alès

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

No abstract provided.


Tradición, Escritura Y Patrimonialización. Anne-Gaël Bilhaut And Silvia Macedo, Editors. Quito, Ecuador. Abya-Yala. 2012., Natalia Buitron Arias, Grégory Deshoullière Jun 2013

Tradición, Escritura Y Patrimonialización. Anne-Gaël Bilhaut And Silvia Macedo, Editors. Quito, Ecuador. Abya-Yala. 2012., Natalia Buitron Arias, Grégory Deshoullière

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

No abstract provided.


Mission, Food, And Commensality Among The Yukpa: Indigenous Creolization And Emerging Complexities In Indigenous Modernities, Ernst Halbmayer Jun 2013

Mission, Food, And Commensality Among The Yukpa: Indigenous Creolization And Emerging Complexities In Indigenous Modernities, Ernst Halbmayer

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

No abstract provided.


The Languages Of Amazonia, Patience Epps, Andrés Pablo Salanova Jun 2013

The Languages Of Amazonia, Patience Epps, Andrés Pablo Salanova

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

No abstract provided.


Systems Of Naming And Creolization: Authentic Acculturation And/Or Authentic Tradition? The Yanomami Case, Catherine Alès Jun 2013

Systems Of Naming And Creolization: Authentic Acculturation And/Or Authentic Tradition? The Yanomami Case, Catherine Alès

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

No abstract provided.


Autodenominations: An Ethnographer’S Account From Peruvian Amazonia, Peter Gow Jun 2013

Autodenominations: An Ethnographer’S Account From Peruvian Amazonia, Peter Gow

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

No abstract provided.


The Werewolf In Between Indians And Whites: Imaginative Frontiers And Mobile Identities In Eighteenth Century Amazonia, Mark Harris Jun 2013

The Werewolf In Between Indians And Whites: Imaginative Frontiers And Mobile Identities In Eighteenth Century Amazonia, Mark Harris

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

No abstract provided.


Imaging Amazonia In The 21st Century: Recent Brazilian Documentaries On Socio-Environmental Conflicts, Jeremy M. Campbell Jun 2013

Imaging Amazonia In The 21st Century: Recent Brazilian Documentaries On Socio-Environmental Conflicts, Jeremy M. Campbell

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

No abstract provided.


Stigmatized Workers & Identity Formation: Spiritual Healers Of Botánicas In San Antonio, Erin Drake Mar 2013

Stigmatized Workers & Identity Formation: Spiritual Healers Of Botánicas In San Antonio, Erin Drake

Undergraduate Student Research Awards

No abstract provided.


A Chronology Of The Introduction Of Domesticated Plants In Central Brazil, Myrtle P. Shock, Renato Kipnis, Lucas Bueno, Francini M. Silva Jan 2013

A Chronology Of The Introduction Of Domesticated Plants In Central Brazil, Myrtle P. Shock, Renato Kipnis, Lucas Bueno, Francini M. Silva

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

The paleoethnobotanical analysis of archaeological remains from two sites in central Brazil provides chronological data for the introduction of domesticated plants to the region. The sites of Lapa dos Bichos and Lapa Pintada, located in the northern portion of the state of Minas Gerais, are within rock shelters in limestone rock outcroppings. The dry conditions at the sites preserved both burnt and unburnt organic materials, including the seeds and fruits that were analyzed in this study. The chronological documentation for the introduction of domesticated plants is based on relative chronology from excavation stratigraphy and radiocarbon dating. The domesticated plants found ...


Amazonian Maize: Diversity, Spatial Distribution And Historical-Cultural Diffusion, Fábio O. Freitas, Patricia G. Bustamante Jan 2013

Amazonian Maize: Diversity, Spatial Distribution And Historical-Cultural Diffusion, Fábio O. Freitas, Patricia G. Bustamante

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

Subsistence is one of the factors that determined the presence or migration of prehistoric human populations. At the same time, humans were largely responsible for the dissemination of important crop plants such as maize (Zea mays). Maize is the major domesticated species in the New World, with thousands of landraces that were shaped by environment and human culture. Genetic analyses of archaeological and indigenous maize samples were used to verify the occurrence in South America of at least two major introductory waves of distinct races of maize from its center of origin in Mexico. The first occurred around 5000 years ...


Genetic Diversity And Differentiation Of Brazilian Bitter And Sweet Manioc Varieties (Manihot Esculenta Crantz, Euphorbiaceae) Based On Ssr Molecular Markers, Gilda Santos Mühlen, Alessandro Alves-Pereira, Charles R. Clement, Teresa Losada Valle Jan 2013

Genetic Diversity And Differentiation Of Brazilian Bitter And Sweet Manioc Varieties (Manihot Esculenta Crantz, Euphorbiaceae) Based On Ssr Molecular Markers, Gilda Santos Mühlen, Alessandro Alves-Pereira, Charles R. Clement, Teresa Losada Valle

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

Manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz) originated in Amazonia and is the main staple for more than 800 million people worldwide; it also had a fundamental role as a source of calories for many pre-Columbian peoples, especially in Amazonia, where it was domesticated. There are two major groups of manioc varieties: sweet varieties have low amounts of toxic substances (cyanogenic glycosides) and may be consumed with minimum processing, while bitter varieties have a high degree of toxicity and must be detoxified to be safe before consumption. These groups are outcomes of divergent selective pressures. Natural selection probably maintains large amounts of cyanogenic ...


Domestication And Dispersal Of Native Crops In Amazonia, Charles R. Clement, Fábio O. Freitas Jan 2013

Domestication And Dispersal Of Native Crops In Amazonia, Charles R. Clement, Fábio O. Freitas

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

Recent decades have witnessed the rapid expansion of interest in and research on the domestication of crop plants worldwide. These species are the basis of the rise to dominance of Homo sapiens over the last 10,000 years. New techniques in archaeology and the expansion of molecular genetics are uncovering abundant evidence to support or refute old hypotheses about human domestication of crops and creation of food production systems that fueled population expansions and linguistic diasporas, and to raise new hypotheses. In Amazonia and elsewhere in lowland South America, archaeologists are starting to examine these hypotheses in earnest, and geneticists ...


Some Current Topics In Plant Domestication: An Overview With Particular Reference To Amazonia, Barbara Pickersgill Jan 2013

Some Current Topics In Plant Domestication: An Overview With Particular Reference To Amazonia, Barbara Pickersgill

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

Amazonia offers some striking contrasts to better-known regions of the world, notably the Middle East, in which plants were domesticated. These contrasts are pertinent to attempts to formulate general principles of evolution under domestication, particularly now that some of these are being critically reexamined. Topics covered in this paper include a generally applicable definition of plant domestication; how domestication may be recognised archaeobotanically; the relative roles of conscious and unconscious human selection; when and how rapidly domestication occurred; whether the same crop was domesticated more than once; and where a crop was domesticated. The archaeobotanical record for Amazonia and the ...


Revealing Fires And Rich Diets: Macro- And Micro-Archaeobotanical Analysis At The Hatahara Site, Central Amazonia, Caroline Fernandes Caromano, Leandro Matthews Cascon, Eduardo Góes Neves, Rita Scheel-Ybert Jan 2013

Revealing Fires And Rich Diets: Macro- And Micro-Archaeobotanical Analysis At The Hatahara Site, Central Amazonia, Caroline Fernandes Caromano, Leandro Matthews Cascon, Eduardo Góes Neves, Rita Scheel-Ybert

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

Numerous questions in Amazonian archaeology place great emphasis on the relationships between human groups and their environments, traditionally drawing inferences from ethnographic analogies. This analytical expedient is justified by the supposedly weak preservation potential of plant remains in the Amazonian environment; however, it is also rooted in a lack of collecting and systematic research of such botanical remains. This paper presents results of archaeobotanical studies undertaken at the Hatahara site, located in Central Amazonia. Analysis of macro and microbotanical remains produced direct evidence of relationships between humans and plants in pre-colonial Central Amazonia. Observation of microbotanical assemblages extracted from artifacts ...


Believing In The Gift: A Case Of Successful Relationships Of Exchange In The Colombian Amazon, Carlos D. Londoño Sulkin Jan 2013

Believing In The Gift: A Case Of Successful Relationships Of Exchange In The Colombian Amazon, Carlos D. Londoño Sulkin

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

Since the late 70’s, the Colombian anthropologist Juan Alvaro Echeverri has logged more than five years in Uitoto and closely related communities in the Colombian Amazon. His relationships with individuals there have been long-lived and surprisingly successful, in contrast with the often-noted disappointment of many philanthropically oriented outsiders—NGO agents, anthropologists, missionaries, government personnel—who come to find ‘their Indians’ to be too materialistic and demanding, and of the Indians who cease to find these would-be philanthropists generous, desirable, or even interesting interlocutors. This essay, meant to be both an ethnographic and theoretical exposition on the forms and implications ...


Terras Pretas De Índio Of The Caquetá-Japurá River (Colombian Amazonia), Gaspar Morcote-Rios, Lauren Raz, Diego Giraldo-Cañas, Carlos E. Franky, Tomas León Sicard Jan 2013

Terras Pretas De Índio Of The Caquetá-Japurá River (Colombian Amazonia), Gaspar Morcote-Rios, Lauren Raz, Diego Giraldo-Cañas, Carlos E. Franky, Tomas León Sicard

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

Amazonian dark earths, or terra preta, constitute archaeological evidence of ancient human settlements. They are distributed throughout the Amazon basin, especially concentrated along its major rivers. In the region of La Pedrera, on the Caquetá (Japurá) River in Colombian Amazonia, archaeological studies have demonstrated the presence of these fertile soils extending over areas of 3 to 5 hectares with an anthropic horizon that varies from 70 cm to 1.2 m in depth. Associated with the sites are faunal remains from fish, turtles, and small rodents, as well as a high density of ceramic fragments and botanical remains, including phytoliths ...


Domestication Of Peach Palm In Southwestern Amazonia, Michelly De Cristo-Araújo, Vanessa Maciel Dos Reis, Doriane Picanço Rodrigues, Charles R. Clement Jan 2013

Domestication Of Peach Palm In Southwestern Amazonia, Michelly De Cristo-Araújo, Vanessa Maciel Dos Reis, Doriane Picanço Rodrigues, Charles R. Clement

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

The peach palm (Bactris gasipaes Kunth) is the only Neotropical palm domesticated by Native Americans. Its place of origin as a crop (B. gasipaes var. gasipaes) has been debated for more than a century, with three hypotheses currently in discussion: southwestern Amazonia; northwestern South America; or multiple origins in the distribution of the wild relatives (B. gasipaes var. chichagui). The small amount of archaeological data available supports the second hypothesis, but they contrast dramatically with the molecular-genetic analyses that support the first or the third, depending on how they are interpreted. On morphological grounds, two of the three types of ...


Houses In A Landscape: Memory And Everyday Life In Mesoamerica [Review], Jennifer P. Mathews Jan 2013

Houses In A Landscape: Memory And Everyday Life In Mesoamerica [Review], Jennifer P. Mathews

Sociology & Anthropology Faculty Research

Using the material remains found in and around ancient Maya domestic spaces in three settlements in Honduras, Hendon examines how aspects of everyday life, rather than ritual and commemoration, transform these shared spaces into ‘places of memory’. She argues that social memory is a reconstructive process and that human groups re-envision the past in light of present circumstances. Social memory – or what she refers to as ‘memory communities' – would have involved an interaction with the remains of the dead, buried within the context of their social spaces. In other words, memory is an active process that binds people together through ...