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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Anthropology

2010

Nebraska Anthropologist

Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mitochondrial And Ychromosomal Dna In The Analysis Of Kinship: Methods, Current Practices, And Areas Of Further Inquiry, Anne M. Cafer Jan 2010

Mitochondrial And Ychromosomal Dna In The Analysis Of Kinship: Methods, Current Practices, And Areas Of Further Inquiry, Anne M. Cafer

Nebraska Anthropologist

This paper examines the use of both mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomal DNA in the study of kinship groups, particularly those from ancient burial sites. The characteristics of both types of DNA that make them suitable for such endeavors as well as methods of application to kinship studies will be outlined. Additionally, specific examples from modern, ancient, and other non-human primate research will be discussed along with the implications of these studies. Finally, ethical concerns and areas of further study will be addressed. This paper is designed to assess the utility of a specific scientific method of analysis that can augment ...


Time Perspectivism As Applied To Three Mennonite Cemeteries In York County, Nebraska, Tayrah Epp Jan 2010

Time Perspectivism As Applied To Three Mennonite Cemeteries In York County, Nebraska, Tayrah Epp

Nebraska Anthropologist

Time perspectivism is a view in which time scales bring into focus different processes, which produces a need to use different concepts and explanatory variables (Bailey 1987, 2007). The three Mennonite cemeteries, Epp, Faith Evangelical and Bethesda, were analyzed using time perspectivism and are linked spatially and temporally to one another as indicated in the headstone inscriptions and decorative motifs. This case study provides an example of short-term scale change in which the Mennonites transition from Standard German to English. Much of this paper s focus is on the Epp cemetery, which when viewed as a palimpsest of meaning show ...


Indigenous Archaeology: Historical Interpretation From An Emic Perspective, Stephanie M. Kennedy Jan 2010

Indigenous Archaeology: Historical Interpretation From An Emic Perspective, Stephanie M. Kennedy

Nebraska Anthropologist

This inquiry explores indigenous archaeology as a form of resistance to dominant Western science. Literature was identified and analyzed pertaining to the success of indigenous archaeology in the United States, British Columbia, and Australia. It is argued that a more inclusive archaeology is necessary, one that encourages partnerships with Indigenous groups in the interpretation of their own past. This study has implications for how we perceive Indigenous peoples from an archaeological perspective.


A Response To "Indigenous Archaeology: Historical Interpretation From An Emic Perspective" - From A Native American Archaeologist's Perspective, Albert M. Lebeau Iii, Andrew E. Labounty Jan 2010

A Response To "Indigenous Archaeology: Historical Interpretation From An Emic Perspective" - From A Native American Archaeologist's Perspective, Albert M. Lebeau Iii, Andrew E. Labounty

Nebraska Anthropologist

This response is written from the point of view of the senior author, the former Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. It is not intended as a rebuttal, per se, but rather an expansion upon the topics addressed in Kennedy's "Indigenous Archaeology: Historical Interpretation from an Emic Perspective." This response is thus designed (and was sought by the Nebraska Anthropologist editorial staff) to broaden the reader's understanding of a complex topic within archaeology.


Nebraska Anthropologist Volume 25 : 2010 Table Of Contents Jan 2010

Nebraska Anthropologist Volume 25 : 2010 Table Of Contents

Nebraska Anthropologist

Indigenous Archaeology: Historical Interpretation from an Emic Perspective (Stephanie M. Kennedy)

A Response to "Indigenous Archaeology: Historical Interpretation from an Emic Perspective" - from a Native American Archaeologist's Perspective (Albert M. LeBeau III and Andrew E. LaBounty)

Mitochondrial and Y-Chromosomal DNA in the Analysis of Kinship: Methods, Current Practices, and Areas of Further Inquiry (Anne M. Cafer)

Deconstructing the Hopewell Interaction Sphere (Steven Sarich)

Time Perspectivism as Applied to Three Mennonite Cemeteries in York County, Nebraska (Tayrah Epp)

An Examination of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Relation to Human Evolution and Life History Theory (Daniel E. Lomelin)

Grave Vows: A Cross-Cultural ...


Grave Vows: A Cross-Cultural Examination Of The Varying Forms Of Ghost Marriage Among Five Societies, Lucas J. Schwartze Jan 2010

Grave Vows: A Cross-Cultural Examination Of The Varying Forms Of Ghost Marriage Among Five Societies, Lucas J. Schwartze

Nebraska Anthropologist

Marriage is one of the most ubiquitous social relationships in human societies. However, the forms this institution takes do not follow the same patterns across all cultures. This paper examines one of the rarer forms of marriage; ghost marriage. After introducing the societies that practice this rare form of marriage, the similarities and differences between the forms this practice takes are examined. Various scholarly explanations for this form of marriage are presented as well.


Paths To Zion: The Mormon Settlement At Wyoming, Ne, Sherri L. Sklenar Jan 2010

Paths To Zion: The Mormon Settlement At Wyoming, Ne, Sherri L. Sklenar

Nebraska Anthropologist

This preliminary study examined the cultural and logistical factors underlying the settlement of the historic town of nyoming, Nebraska. Located along the Mormon Trail, this site provides a new window for understanding the dynamics of nineteenth century u.s. emigrant trails. Utilizing a body of primary and secondary documents as well as cartographic source, the preliminary analysis revealed two integrated themes: (1) frontier logistics and expansion and (2) religious values and experiences. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, or Mormons, needed both a prosperous town to equip themselves for their journey to Salt Lake City and a ...


Aging In America: Now And When, Laura Ihrig Jan 2010

Aging In America: Now And When, Laura Ihrig

Nebraska Anthropologist

The following paper is a study of aging in two societies, the United States and the traditional culture of the !Kung of western Botswana, Africa. The material reviewed includes current and projected population trends, cultural norms with regard to the elderly, and potential future implications of the gathered information. Resources consisted of journal articles, books, and government agency reports.


An Examination Of Autism Spectrum Disorders In Relation To Human Evolution And Life History Theory, Daniel E. Lomelin Jan 2010

An Examination Of Autism Spectrum Disorders In Relation To Human Evolution And Life History Theory, Daniel E. Lomelin

Nebraska Anthropologist

Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorders are multifaceted conditions that are being diagnosed increasingly in Western nations. Current research suggests genetic and epigenetic effects as well as social and environmental conditions all playing direct roles in the expression and development of these disorders. Evaluating the development of the human brain s increased intelligence and plasticity in terms of human life history and evolutionary trade offs allows for new hypotheses to be formed regarding the development of the disorders. Aspects of the broad autism phenotype may have given ancient humans advantages in tool making and mechanical thinking, thus preserving the trait in ...


Deconstructing The Hopewell Interaction Sphere, Steven Sarich Jan 2010

Deconstructing The Hopewell Interaction Sphere, Steven Sarich

Nebraska Anthropologist

It is the intention of this paper to ponder the impetus behind the Hopewell Interaction Sphere and relate it back to the Hopewell society as a whole. I will present a number of models offered by other researchers and find a common theme that connects them all, namely ceremonialism. Socially valued items and ceremonialism are closely tied according to Katherine Spielmann and so through close examination I will find out how close they are. Also, more contemporary cross-cultural examples of ritual exchange will be presented to show its prevalence through time.