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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

The Places Of Birth: Navigating Risk, Control, And Choice, Hannah E. Emple May 2010

The Places Of Birth: Navigating Risk, Control, And Choice, Hannah E. Emple

Geography Honors Projects

Through qualitative research in the Twin Cities, Minnesota and a literature review grounded in health and feminist geography, this paper analyzes how women, their families, and health care providers view and navigate places of birth. Over four million births occur annually in the United States, making birth the most common reason for hospitalization of women. Although 99% of women in the U.S. give birth in hospitals, a small but vocal minority seek alternative places to birth – primarily at home. Where to give birth is a contested subject infused with social and political significance. I suggest that place is highly ...


Weaving Development: Cultural Preservation And Economic Improvement In Cochabamba, Bolivia, Sarah Van Etten May 2010

Weaving Development: Cultural Preservation And Economic Improvement In Cochabamba, Bolivia, Sarah Van Etten

Anthropology Honors Projects

This ethnographic study examines the tensions and contradictions between goals of “cultural preservation” and “economic improvement” in a development oriented weaving cooperative based in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Through a nuanced analysis of the ways these goals are manifested in three weaving villages, I argue that they in fact support each other and that it is a discourse of differences that strengthens the organization. By understanding tradition as active and emphasizing collaboration, the Asociación de Artesanos Andinos facilitates this discourse and allows for a more fluid and productive negotiation of these seemingly conflicting objectives.


Negotiating Everyday Islam After Socialism: A Study Of The Kazakhs Of Bayan-Ulgii, Mongolia, Namara Brede May 2010

Negotiating Everyday Islam After Socialism: A Study Of The Kazakhs Of Bayan-Ulgii, Mongolia, Namara Brede

Geography Honors Projects

Using ethnographic interviews and participant observations from the Kazakh community of Bayan-Ulgii, Mongolia in June 2009, this study examines how Islamic discourses, practices, experiences, and scales of influence are negotiated in post-socialist Central Asia. To do this, local, national, and transnational dynamics of Mongolian Kazakh religious practice are considered alongside the individual-scale mediating roles of personal preference, social position, life course, power, and social networks. Islam in Bayan-Ulgii is shown to be integral to community and ethnic identity but also multifaceted, dynamic, and multi-scalar, militating against essentialist portrayals of Islam as monolithic or dichotomously split between “high” and “low” forms.


Gather Us Together As Jews From The Four Corners Of The Earth: The Emergence And Endurance Of The Abayudaya In Uganda, Maggie A. Yates Apr 2010

Gather Us Together As Jews From The Four Corners Of The Earth: The Emergence And Endurance Of The Abayudaya In Uganda, Maggie A. Yates

Anthropology Honors Projects

This thesis contributes to the emerging body of literature on African Jewry by exploring factors contributing to the emergence and endurance of the Abayudaya, a Jewish community located in eastern Uganda that converted to Judaism in 1919. Ethnography coupled with theories stemming from Globalization Studies, Anthropology of Religion, and African Studies, reveal that the Abayudaya’s conversion and continued existence is the result of a complex relationship between the community’s constructed ethnicity and globalizing forces. While aspects of globalization threaten the Abayudaya’s existence, globalization ultimately provides them the space and strategies to maintain and reinforce their ethnic identity ...


The Hajj: Piety, The Islamic Awakening & Authority In Morocco, Robert Jentsch Apr 2010

The Hajj: Piety, The Islamic Awakening & Authority In Morocco, Robert Jentsch

Anthropology Honors Projects

This paper demonstrates the cultural meaning of the hajj to Moroccans through grounded ethnography. Completing the hajj symbolizes both material success and Islamic piety while calling to the fore a distinctly Moroccan breed of authority derived from a ritualized process of submission with roots in the country's Sufi traditions. Such cultural meaning is brokered by a confluence of global social processes playing out in the local Moroccan setting. The channels of globalization simultaneously underscore "Western" capitalist values of acquisition and financial mobility and encourage individuals to embrace a regional Islamic Awakening that emphasizes the importance of devoutness for self-realization.