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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Anthropology

2000

Wisconsin

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

The Use And Performance Of Intensiverotational Grazing Among Wisconsin Dairy Farms In The 1990s, M. Ostrom, Douglas B. Jackson-Smith Jan 2000

The Use And Performance Of Intensiverotational Grazing Among Wisconsin Dairy Farms In The 1990s, M. Ostrom, Douglas B. Jackson-Smith

Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology Faculty Publications

Growing numbers of Wisconsin dairy farmers have reported success using management intensive rotational grazing (MIRG) techniques that rely on pastures as the primary source of forage for their milking herds. The Program on Agricultural Technology Studies (PATS) has been tracking the use and performance of MIRG systems in Wisconsin since the early 1990s through periodic, large-scale, random sample surveys and on-farm interviews with Wisconsin farmers. Utilizing recent results from the PATS 1997 and 1999 Wisconsin Dairy Farm Polls, this report provides an important update to previous PATS reports. In our surveys, the dairy farmers who report utilizing pastures for forage ...


Management Intensive Rotational Grazingin Wisconsin: The 1990s, M. Ostrom, Douglas B. Jackson-Smith Jan 2000

Management Intensive Rotational Grazingin Wisconsin: The 1990s, M. Ostrom, Douglas B. Jackson-Smith

Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology Faculty Publications

Growing numbers of Wisconsin dairy farmers have reported success using management intensive rotational grazing (MIRG) techniques that rely on pastures as the primary source of forage for their milking herds. The Program on Agricultural Technology Studies (PATS) has been tracking the use and performance of MIRG systems in Wisconsin since the early 1990s through periodic large-scale, random sample surveys of Wisconsin dairy farmers. This fact sheet incorporates recent results from PATS 1999 Dairy Farmer Poll into an overall summary of PATS grazing research.


How Wisconsin Farmers Feed Theircows: Results Of The 1999 Wisconsin Dairy Herd Feeding Study, Douglas B. Jackson-Smith, J. M. Powell Jan 2000

How Wisconsin Farmers Feed Theircows: Results Of The 1999 Wisconsin Dairy Herd Feeding Study, Douglas B. Jackson-Smith, J. M. Powell

Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology Faculty Publications

The Wisconsin dairy industry has seen dramatic changes over the last 20 years (Jackson- Smith and Barham, 2000). Overall, dairy farm numbers have been cut in half since the early 1980s, and the average size of remaining herds has increased by more than 60 percent (from roughly 40 cows to over 65 cows per herd). Despite these changes, most dairies are still single-family businesses, relying on household members for virtually all their farm labor requirements (Buttel et al., 2000). In 1998, state statistics suggested that over 70 percent of Wisconsin dairy operations were milking between 30 and 99 cows, and ...


Wisconsin Dairy Farmer Views Onuniversity Research And Extension Programs, M. Ostrom, Douglas B. Jackson-Smith, S. Moon Jan 2000

Wisconsin Dairy Farmer Views Onuniversity Research And Extension Programs, M. Ostrom, Douglas B. Jackson-Smith, S. Moon

Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology Faculty Publications

Over the last decade, the Program on Agricultural Technology Studies (PATS) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has received a wide range of formal and informal comments from Wisconsin farmers regarding the direction of university research and extension programs. In an era of declining Extension budgets, increasing privatization, and a rapidly changing farm structure, the debate about where to focus scarce public resources takes on an added significance. Is there still an important role for land grant institutions to play in agriculture in the new century? If so, how can limited resources be targeted most effectively? What do farmers and other ...