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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Politics And Images Heroism And Illusion, Joel Halpern Mar 2000

Politics And Images Heroism And Illusion, Joel Halpern

Joel M. Halpern

Images of conflict as between nationalist rural nostalgia and cosmopolitan urban culture. That is I see "cosmopolitan urban culture" as much as an illusion of modernity as is "nationalist rural nostalgia." The former supposedly looks toward the future, while the latter is presumably past oriented but they are clearly both products of present-day realities.


Emily Balch: Balkan Traveller, Peace Worker And Noble Laureate, Elinor M. Despalatovic, Joel Halpern Dec 1999

Emily Balch: Balkan Traveller, Peace Worker And Noble Laureate, Elinor M. Despalatovic, Joel Halpern

Joel M. Halpern

Emily Greene Balch is a women of truly international significance. She won the Noble Peace Prize in 1946. She was the second American woman to be so honored and the second as of this date.


An Anthropologist In The Village, Barbara Kerewsky-Halpern Dec 1999

An Anthropologist In The Village, Barbara Kerewsky-Halpern

Joel M. Halpern

Over 36 years An anthropologist has traveled continuously between the Balkans and the United States. This research travel is unusual in the anthropological record, representing an adult time during which she has been moving in two separate worlds- that of her culture or origin and that of a woman maturing in a peasant village. Personal literary experience on her life experiences within a Serbian peasant household.


Yugoslavian Villagers, Joel Halpern Dec 1999

Yugoslavian Villagers, Joel Halpern

Joel M. Halpern

In 1918 the different writing systems, languages, religions, and nationalities were joined into a single country-Yugoslavia. And the country was divided into six official republics that are something like the states of the United States. The people, however, continued to write, speak, go to church, and follow customs in their own special ways. So there is no such thing as a "typical " Yugoslavian. However, more than half the people of Yugoslavia have at least one thing in common. They live in the country rather than in the city .