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Dating The Prehistoric Davis Site (44la46) In Lancaster County, Virginia, Marcus M. Key, Jr., Emily S. Gaskin Jan 2000

Dating The Prehistoric Davis Site (44la46) In Lancaster County, Virginia, Marcus M. Key, Jr., Emily S. Gaskin

Faculty and Staff Publications By Year

The Davis Site ( 44LA46) is a multicomponent (colonial and prehistoric) site located on the Eastern Branch of the Corrotoman River in Lancaster County, Virginia. Plow zone surface collections included numerous Native American pottery sherds and projectile points. The goal of the study was to date the site's prehistoric occupation using the typological approach with the pottery sherds and projectile points. The pottery wares present included Mockley, Townsend, and Potomac Creek, with Mockley Ware being the most common. The pottery sherds indicate a maximum range of occupation from the Middle Woodland period to the historic period with a weighted mean ...


Geoarcheology Of Terra Cotta Tobacco Pipes From The Colonial Period Davis Site (44la46), Lancaster County, Virginia, Marcus M. Key, Jr., Tara E. Jones Jan 2000

Geoarcheology Of Terra Cotta Tobacco Pipes From The Colonial Period Davis Site (44la46), Lancaster County, Virginia, Marcus M. Key, Jr., Tara E. Jones

Faculty and Staff Publications By Year

The Davis Site ( 44LA46) is a multicomponent (colonial and prehistoric) site located on the Eastern Branch of the Corrotoman River in Lancaster County, Virginia. Plowzone surface collections include a few terra cotta tobacco pipe bowls and stem fragments. This colonial component has been dated to 1650--1718 (mean date: 1684). The site is located 120 m (400 ft) from a clay outcrop of the Late Pleistocene Sedgefield Member of the Tabb Formation. This formation outcrops extensively in the tidewater region of Virginia. The goal of the study was to determine if this formation was a viable clay source for manufacturing terracotta ...


Geoarcheology Of Native American Pottery From The Prehistoric Davis Site (44la46) In Lancaster County, Virginia, Marcus M. Key, Jr., Emily S. Gaskin Jan 2000

Geoarcheology Of Native American Pottery From The Prehistoric Davis Site (44la46) In Lancaster County, Virginia, Marcus M. Key, Jr., Emily S. Gaskin

Faculty and Staff Publications By Year

The Davis Site (44LA46) is a multicomponent (colonial and prehistoric) site located on the Eastern Branch of the Corrotoman River in Lancaster County, Virginia. The Native American occupation has been dated with archeological evidence from the Early Archaic to historic periods. Plow zone surface collections included numerous Native American pottery sherds. The pottery wares present included Mockley, Townsend, and Potomac Creek, with Mockley ware being the most common. The goals of the study were: (1) to determine the firing temperatures of the Native American pottery; and (2) to determine if local clay was viable for manufacturing Native American pottery found ...


Dating The Colonial-Era Davis Site (44la46) In Lancaster County, Virginia, Marcus M. Key, Jr., Tara E. Jones, Carolyn H. Jett Jan 2000

Dating The Colonial-Era Davis Site (44la46) In Lancaster County, Virginia, Marcus M. Key, Jr., Tara E. Jones, Carolyn H. Jett

Faculty and Staff Publications By Year

This is the first detailed archeological analysis of the Davis Site (44LA46), located on the Eastern Branch of the Corrotoman River in Lancaster County, Virginia. The goal of the study was to date the site's colonial occupation using historical archeological methods. Plow zone surface collections, which were dominated by clay tobacco pipe fragments, formed the basis of the study. The very complete courthouse records in Lancaster County permitted an integrated historical archeological approach to dating the site. The timing of colonial occupation was determined using five independent approaches. The first three were based on archeological artifacts: (1) pipe stem ...