Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Anthropology

2000

Utah State University

Wisconsin dairy

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

A Profile Of Wisconsin's Dairyindustry, 1999, F. H. Buttel, Douglas B. Jackson-Smith, S. Moon Jan 2000

A Profile Of Wisconsin's Dairyindustry, 1999, F. H. Buttel, Douglas B. Jackson-Smith, S. Moon

Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology Faculty Publications

In the late winter and early spring of 1999, the Program on Agricultural Technology Studies (PATS)2 surveyed over 1,600 of Wisconsin’s dairy farmers. Because the sample was large, was drawn randomly from the Wisconsin Dairy Producers List, and yielded a relatively high response rate (50 percent), the results provide a scientifically reliable snapshot of the Wisconsin dairy farming sector as of the spring of 1999. This report provides an overview of the initial findings of the overall study. The emphasis of this report is on the characteristics of the Wisconsin dairy farming sector, and on the characteristics ...


The Changing Face Of Wisconsin Dairyfarms: A Summary Of Pats Research On Structural Change In The 1990s, Douglas B. Jackson-Smith, B. Barham Jan 2000

The Changing Face Of Wisconsin Dairyfarms: A Summary Of Pats Research On Structural Change In The 1990s, Douglas B. Jackson-Smith, B. Barham

Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology Faculty Publications

Medium-sized, diversified, family-labor farms1 have long defined the structure of dairy farming in “America’s Dairyland.” The red barns, silos, farm houses, and fields of hay, grain, and pasture associated with these operations have given rise to the state’s distinctive pastoral landscapes. As family businesses these farms have been successful enough to provide their operators with “middle-class” standards of living. Nationally, in the 20th century, Wisconsin’s dairy sector produced more milk and especially more cheese than any other state in the U.S. Among Wisconsin residents, much cultural pride stems from the state’s preeminence in dairying — car ...