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Nebraska Anthropologist, Volume 28: 2013 -- Contents And Frontmatter, Anthrogroup, Holly Staggs, John K. Fitzpatrick Iii, Nora C. Greiman, M. G. Lapera Jan 2013

Nebraska Anthropologist, Volume 28: 2013 -- Contents And Frontmatter, Anthrogroup, Holly Staggs, John K. Fitzpatrick Iii, Nora C. Greiman, M. G. Lapera

Nebraska Anthropologist

There are not many student-run academic journals, and even fewer student-run anthropological journals. We are happy to provide a forum in which anthropologists and other similarly-interested students can present their interests and intellectual work. Anthropology is the study of humanity in all walks of life, and Nebraska Anthropologist is a small testament to what can be accomplished when a community works together.

This 28th anniversary volume would not have been possible without the guidance and support of the editors that have gone before us, notably Benjamin Grant Purzycki and all those whose work has instilled Nebraska Anthropologist with its quality ...


Nebraska Anthropologist, Volume 27 : 2012 -- Contents And Frontmatter, Anthrogroup, Christine A. Nyez, Holly Staggs, Kristine Sudbeck, Allison Young Jan 2012

Nebraska Anthropologist, Volume 27 : 2012 -- Contents And Frontmatter, Anthrogroup, Christine A. Nyez, Holly Staggs, Kristine Sudbeck, Allison Young

Nebraska Anthropologist

There are not many student-run academic journals, and even fewer student-run anthropological journals. We are happy to provide a forum in which anthropologists and other similarly-interested students can present their interests and intellectual work. Anthropology is the study of humanity in all walks of life, and Nebraska Anthropologist is a small testament to what can be accomplished when a community works together.

This 27th anniversary volume would not have been possible without the guidance and support of the editors that have gone before us, notably Benjamin Grant Purzycki aDd all those whose work has instilled Nebraska Anthropologist with its quality ...


Mitochondrial And Ychromosomal Dna In The Analysis Of Kinship: Methods, Current Practices, And Areas Of Further Inquiry, Anne M. Cafer Jan 2010

Mitochondrial And Ychromosomal Dna In The Analysis Of Kinship: Methods, Current Practices, And Areas Of Further Inquiry, Anne M. Cafer

Nebraska Anthropologist

This paper examines the use of both mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomal DNA in the study of kinship groups, particularly those from ancient burial sites. The characteristics of both types of DNA that make them suitable for such endeavors as well as methods of application to kinship studies will be outlined. Additionally, specific examples from modern, ancient, and other non-human primate research will be discussed along with the implications of these studies. Finally, ethical concerns and areas of further study will be addressed. This paper is designed to assess the utility of a specific scientific method of analysis that can augment ...


Time Perspectivism As Applied To Three Mennonite Cemeteries In York County, Nebraska, Tayrah Epp Jan 2010

Time Perspectivism As Applied To Three Mennonite Cemeteries In York County, Nebraska, Tayrah Epp

Nebraska Anthropologist

Time perspectivism is a view in which time scales bring into focus different processes, which produces a need to use different concepts and explanatory variables (Bailey 1987, 2007). The three Mennonite cemeteries, Epp, Faith Evangelical and Bethesda, were analyzed using time perspectivism and are linked spatially and temporally to one another as indicated in the headstone inscriptions and decorative motifs. This case study provides an example of short-term scale change in which the Mennonites transition from Standard German to English. Much of this paper s focus is on the Epp cemetery, which when viewed as a palimpsest of meaning show ...


Aging In America: Now And When, Laura Ihrig Jan 2010

Aging In America: Now And When, Laura Ihrig

Nebraska Anthropologist

The following paper is a study of aging in two societies, the United States and the traditional culture of the !Kung of western Botswana, Africa. The material reviewed includes current and projected population trends, cultural norms with regard to the elderly, and potential future implications of the gathered information. Resources consisted of journal articles, books, and government agency reports.


Indigenous Archaeology: Historical Interpretation From An Emic Perspective, Stephanie M. Kennedy Jan 2010

Indigenous Archaeology: Historical Interpretation From An Emic Perspective, Stephanie M. Kennedy

Nebraska Anthropologist

This inquiry explores indigenous archaeology as a form of resistance to dominant Western science. Literature was identified and analyzed pertaining to the success of indigenous archaeology in the United States, British Columbia, and Australia. It is argued that a more inclusive archaeology is necessary, one that encourages partnerships with Indigenous groups in the interpretation of their own past. This study has implications for how we perceive Indigenous peoples from an archaeological perspective.


A Response To "Indigenous Archaeology: Historical Interpretation From An Emic Perspective" - From A Native American Archaeologist's Perspective, Albert M. Lebeau Iii, Andrew E. Labounty Jan 2010

A Response To "Indigenous Archaeology: Historical Interpretation From An Emic Perspective" - From A Native American Archaeologist's Perspective, Albert M. Lebeau Iii, Andrew E. Labounty

Nebraska Anthropologist

This response is written from the point of view of the senior author, the former Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. It is not intended as a rebuttal, per se, but rather an expansion upon the topics addressed in Kennedy's "Indigenous Archaeology: Historical Interpretation from an Emic Perspective." This response is thus designed (and was sought by the Nebraska Anthropologist editorial staff) to broaden the reader's understanding of a complex topic within archaeology.


An Examination Of Autism Spectrum Disorders In Relation To Human Evolution And Life History Theory, Daniel E. Lomelin Jan 2010

An Examination Of Autism Spectrum Disorders In Relation To Human Evolution And Life History Theory, Daniel E. Lomelin

Nebraska Anthropologist

Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorders are multifaceted conditions that are being diagnosed increasingly in Western nations. Current research suggests genetic and epigenetic effects as well as social and environmental conditions all playing direct roles in the expression and development of these disorders. Evaluating the development of the human brain s increased intelligence and plasticity in terms of human life history and evolutionary trade offs allows for new hypotheses to be formed regarding the development of the disorders. Aspects of the broad autism phenotype may have given ancient humans advantages in tool making and mechanical thinking, thus preserving the trait in ...


Nebraska Anthropologist Volume 25 : 2010 Table Of Contents Jan 2010

Nebraska Anthropologist Volume 25 : 2010 Table Of Contents

Nebraska Anthropologist

Indigenous Archaeology: Historical Interpretation from an Emic Perspective (Stephanie M. Kennedy)

A Response to "Indigenous Archaeology: Historical Interpretation from an Emic Perspective" - from a Native American Archaeologist's Perspective (Albert M. LeBeau III and Andrew E. LaBounty)

Mitochondrial and Y-Chromosomal DNA in the Analysis of Kinship: Methods, Current Practices, and Areas of Further Inquiry (Anne M. Cafer)

Deconstructing the Hopewell Interaction Sphere (Steven Sarich)

Time Perspectivism as Applied to Three Mennonite Cemeteries in York County, Nebraska (Tayrah Epp)

An Examination of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Relation to Human Evolution and Life History Theory (Daniel E. Lomelin)

Grave Vows: A Cross-Cultural ...


Deconstructing The Hopewell Interaction Sphere, Steven Sarich Jan 2010

Deconstructing The Hopewell Interaction Sphere, Steven Sarich

Nebraska Anthropologist

It is the intention of this paper to ponder the impetus behind the Hopewell Interaction Sphere and relate it back to the Hopewell society as a whole. I will present a number of models offered by other researchers and find a common theme that connects them all, namely ceremonialism. Socially valued items and ceremonialism are closely tied according to Katherine Spielmann and so through close examination I will find out how close they are. Also, more contemporary cross-cultural examples of ritual exchange will be presented to show its prevalence through time.


Grave Vows: A Cross-Cultural Examination Of The Varying Forms Of Ghost Marriage Among Five Societies, Lucas J. Schwartze Jan 2010

Grave Vows: A Cross-Cultural Examination Of The Varying Forms Of Ghost Marriage Among Five Societies, Lucas J. Schwartze

Nebraska Anthropologist

Marriage is one of the most ubiquitous social relationships in human societies. However, the forms this institution takes do not follow the same patterns across all cultures. This paper examines one of the rarer forms of marriage; ghost marriage. After introducing the societies that practice this rare form of marriage, the similarities and differences between the forms this practice takes are examined. Various scholarly explanations for this form of marriage are presented as well.


Paths To Zion: The Mormon Settlement At Wyoming, Ne, Sherri L. Sklenar Jan 2010

Paths To Zion: The Mormon Settlement At Wyoming, Ne, Sherri L. Sklenar

Nebraska Anthropologist

This preliminary study examined the cultural and logistical factors underlying the settlement of the historic town of nyoming, Nebraska. Located along the Mormon Trail, this site provides a new window for understanding the dynamics of nineteenth century u.s. emigrant trails. Utilizing a body of primary and secondary documents as well as cartographic source, the preliminary analysis revealed two integrated themes: (1) frontier logistics and expansion and (2) religious values and experiences. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, or Mormons, needed both a prosperous town to equip themselves for their journey to Salt Lake City and a ...


Domestication And Significance Of Persea Americana, The Avocado, In Mesoamerica, Amanda J. Landon Jan 2009

Domestication And Significance Of Persea Americana, The Avocado, In Mesoamerica, Amanda J. Landon

Nebraska Anthropologist

The avocado (persea americana) is grown all over the modern world in tropical and subtropical climates for food and cosmetics (Humani 1987). In antiquity, the avocado was important to the Ancient Maya not only for food but also as a part of their mythology. Avocados were grown in sacred gardens, and important ancestors were thought to become reborn through fruit trees, including the avocado. Here, I examine the cultural context of the avocado and the issues related to understanding the domestication of the avocado and other tropical fruit trees. I discuss archaeological and molecular evidence, and offer direction for future ...


Nebraska Anthropologist Volume 24 : 2009 Table Of Contents Jan 2009

Nebraska Anthropologist Volume 24 : 2009 Table Of Contents

Nebraska Anthropologist

The Expansion of Class Concepts and the Colorado Coal Field War Project (David M. Amrine)

A Preliminary Survey of Lesser-Known Polyandrous Societies (Katie E. Starkweather)

"This Countries Ladies": Gender Negotiations at the Northwest Company, Grand Portage (Andrew E. LaBounty)

Utopian and Communal Societies: The Importance of Institutionalized Awe Through Ideology (Matthew H. Brittingham)

Domestication and Significance of Persea americana, the Avocado, in Mesoamerica (Amanda J. Landon)

Trends of Pathogen Overload and the Influence on Social Behavior (Dylan Wall)

Shipbuilding and the English International Timber Trade, 1300-1700: a framework for study using Niche Construction Theory (Jillian R. Smith)


Shipbuilding And The English International Timber Trade, 1300-1700: A Framework For Study Using Niche Construction Theory, Jillian R. Smith Jan 2009

Shipbuilding And The English International Timber Trade, 1300-1700: A Framework For Study Using Niche Construction Theory, Jillian R. Smith

Nebraska Anthropologist

Much scholarship has been undertaken with regards to the evolution of the European shipbuilding traditions and their physical changes, but few explanations for the changes are given. This paper seeks to identify the correlations between the expansion of the English timber trade in the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries and the changes in shipbuilding at the time, thereby creating a framework for future study of this correlation and its possible relatedness using Niche Construction Theory as a framework. Directions the research can take and the data needed are the focus of this work.


A Preliminary Survey Of Lesser-Known Polyandrous Societies, Katie Starkweather Jan 2009

A Preliminary Survey Of Lesser-Known Polyandrous Societies, Katie Starkweather

Nebraska Anthropologist

To challenge the common misconception that there are only four societies in the world that allow polyandry, this paper uses types of polyandry, suggested by Levine and Sangree (1980), to identify polyandrous societies from India, Africa, South America, and North America. Basic issues of these societies are examined within the context of four commonly cited attempts to explain the existence of polyandry. The goal of the paper is a preliminary look at the existence of polyandry around the world and an initial exploration of issues that mayor may not be associated with this form of marriage.


Trends Of Pathogen Overload And The Influence On Social Behavior, Dylan Wall Jan 2009

Trends Of Pathogen Overload And The Influence On Social Behavior, Dylan Wall

Nebraska Anthropologist

A review of the literature has been undertaken showing that higher levels of pathogen stress have been positively correlated with multiple aspects of social structure: non-sororal polygyny (Ember et al. 2007; Low 1990), exogamy and bride capture (Low 1990), resource defense (Barber 2008; Hames 1996), and male-female body alteration (Singh and Bronstad 1997). Non-sororal polygyny is the most effective reproductive strategy to defend against pathogen stress, as it promotes much genetic variability within gene pools, allowing for more pathogenic resistance in individuals because of heterozygous al/eles. In order to secure mates while faced with ecological extremes, individuals will modify ...


The Expansion Of Class Concepts And The Colorado Coal Field War Project, David M. Amrine Jan 2009

The Expansion Of Class Concepts And The Colorado Coal Field War Project, David M. Amrine

Nebraska Anthropologist

The Colorado Coal Field War Project was an attempt by McGuire, Reckner, and others to develop a 'working-class' archaeology that served the public as well as the archaeologists performing excavations and research. The attempt was successful, promoting and supporting ideas that had been discussed in archaeology about gender, class, and the treatment of archaeology as a craft. Their example of using archaeology to benefit communities as well as academic interests can and should be tested in other regions of the United States as well as the rest of the world.


Utopian And Communal Societies: The Importance Of Institutionalized Awe Through Ideology, Matthew H. Brittingham Jan 2009

Utopian And Communal Societies: The Importance Of Institutionalized Awe Through Ideology, Matthew H. Brittingham

Nebraska Anthropologist

America s utopian and communal societies have a long history of using transcendence as a commitment mechanism for followers and converts. The most prevalent commitment mechanism is institutionalized awe through ideology. This principle is extremely important to utopian communities and societies in terms of longevity. Sometimes the ideologies need to be changed in order to help a community sustain awe, and, through the awe, membership. Some of the most successful utopian communities in American history utilized the flexibility of their ideologies to maintain awe and sustain the needs of their members, especially in tragic and difficult circumstances. The American communal ...


"This Countries Ladies": Gender Negotiations At The Northwest Company, Grand Portage, Andrew E. Labounty Jan 2009

"This Countries Ladies": Gender Negotiations At The Northwest Company, Grand Portage, Andrew E. Labounty

Nebraska Anthropologist

French interactions with Indians during the fur trade were characterized by intermarriage and cultural assimilation. Later, when Canadian traders took over, women were notably present at the Northwest Company s depot at Grand Portage, and participated in its affairs. Although the seasonal workings of Canadian fur trade depots are well-established, gender roles have been typically overlooked in the day-to-day recount of fur trade societies. This paper will thus investigate the aspect of gender at fur trade posts, and particularly at Grand Portage, as a study in cross-cultural negotiations for the fulfillment of gender roles.


Temporal Insanity: Woodland Archaeology And The Construction Of Valid Chronologies, Erin C. Dempsey Jan 2008

Temporal Insanity: Woodland Archaeology And The Construction Of Valid Chronologies, Erin C. Dempsey

Nebraska Anthropologist

This paper will bring to light the problems existing in the current, working chronology employed in Woodland Period archaeology and determine how, possibly, these problems can be alleviated. I assert that creating new chronologies that speak to specific research questions and doing away with a static and unchanging culture-historical perspective in Woodland Period archaeology will help archaeologists better investigate how people lived and interacted during this time and, more importantly, how they facilitated and experienced cultural change in the Eastern Woodlands of North America. By lifting the framework culture history has superimposed on the archaeology of Woodland peoples (i.e ...


Technological Introductions And Social Change: European Technology On The Great Plains, Andrew Labounty Jan 2008

Technological Introductions And Social Change: European Technology On The Great Plains, Andrew Labounty

Nebraska Anthropologist

This paper will explore the changing structure of American Indian society with the introduction of Euro-American technology and practices on the Plains. I intend to compare and contrast social aspects of Indian culture before and after contact, including the presence and intensity of marriage exchanges, levels of exogamy, the intensity of polygyny, and degree of stratification among native groups. These comparisons will shed light on the mechanisms of culture change, showing the entire process to be gradual and often due to conscious, immediately beneficial decisions.


The "How" Of The Three Sisters: The Origins Of Agriculture In Mesoamerica And The Human Niche, Amanda J. Landon Jan 2008

The "How" Of The Three Sisters: The Origins Of Agriculture In Mesoamerica And The Human Niche, Amanda J. Landon

Nebraska Anthropologist

The origins of agriculture· in Mesoamerica have long interested archaeologists and antiquarians alike. The approaches used to understand the origins of the three sisters, maize, beans and squash, have changed over time as our understanding of the ecological context and ethnographic influences have changed. In this paper, I examine the history of the study of the origins of agriculture and assess the current evolutionary and ecological approaches to the topic. In Mesoamerica, the three sisters and humans shared a co evolutionary relationship in which humans invited the plants into the human niche and the plants thrived. Over time, the plants ...


In Search Of Blood-Stained Earth: A Consideration Of Battlefield Archaeology's Applicability To Pre-Historic Conflict In The Eastern And Central Regions Of North America, Andrew P. Mcfeaters Jan 2008

In Search Of Blood-Stained Earth: A Consideration Of Battlefield Archaeology's Applicability To Pre-Historic Conflict In The Eastern And Central Regions Of North America, Andrew P. Mcfeaters

Nebraska Anthropologist

During the last twenty-four years archaeologists have proven that we are now able to investigate a previously inaccessible part of the archaeological record: the battlefield. These fields of conflict, once inaccessible due to their nature, have become accessible to archaeologists through the use of metal detectors, the global positioning system (GPS), remote sensing, historical documents, maps, photographs (aerial and period), and the geographic information system (GIS), among the traditional methods used in archaeological research, such as surface surveys and excavation. However, battlefield archaeology's current scope is limited to those conflicts recorded by history. Is it possible for battlefield archaeologists ...


Nebraska Anthropologist Volume 23 : 2008 Table Of Contents Jan 2008

Nebraska Anthropologist Volume 23 : 2008 Table Of Contents

Nebraska Anthropologist

In Search of Blood-Stained Earth: A Consideration of Battlefield Archaeology's Applicability to Pre-Historic Conflict in the Eastern and Central Regions of North America (Andrew P. McFeaters)

Technological Introductions and Social Change: European Technology on the Great Plains (Andrew LaBounty)

Temporal Insanity: Woodland Archaeology and the Construction of Valid ChronologIies (Erin C. Dempsey)

Time Perspectivism, Temporal Dynamics, and Battlefield Archaeology: A Case Study from the Santiago Campaign of 1898 (William E. Altizer)

Collective Memory of the Prehistoric Past and the Archaeological Landscape (Cynthia J. Wiley)

Cultural Mentoring at Lincoln North Star High School: A Case Study (Stephen Damm)

The "How ...


Collective Memory Of The Prehistoric Past And The Archaeological Landscape, Cynthia J. Wiley Jan 2008

Collective Memory Of The Prehistoric Past And The Archaeological Landscape, Cynthia J. Wiley

Nebraska Anthropologist

The crossroads of archaeological investigation and indigenous oral tradition are ripe with potential for increased interaction between archaeologists and Native Americans. This interaction may become increasingly mandated in the future as NAGPRA affects excavations and material culture collections. Currently this body of information is not being fully utilized. However, as examples of chronologically lengthy prehistoric memory develop, including myths and traditions related to Pleistocene mammals, archaeologists must be prepared to incorporate this information into research designs and interpretations. Strong (1934) and Echo-Hawk (2000) provide a way to critique and organize oral tradition for analysis. Archaeologists must build on this foundation ...


Time Perspectivism, Temporal Dynamics, And Battlefield Archaeology: A Case Study From The Santiago Campaign Of 1898, William E. Altizer Jan 2008

Time Perspectivism, Temporal Dynamics, And Battlefield Archaeology: A Case Study From The Santiago Campaign Of 1898, William E. Altizer

Nebraska Anthropologist

Given the unique ability of archaeology to illuminate temporal processes, archaeologists have begun employing a number of theoretical models to understand the nature of these processes, and the ways in which the modern archaeological landscape retains their physical traces. Battlefields, as discrete temporal events taking place in physical settings with their own history, offer an intriguing avenue to explore archaeological temporality. This paper reviews the ways in which archaeologists have employed the Annales approach and time perspectivism, and considers a case study in battlefield archaeology - the 1898 battlefield of EI Caney, Cuba.


Cultural Identity And Continuity At The Missions Of New Spain: Examining The Native American Experience At The Spanish Missions Of Texas, William E. Altizer Jan 2007

Cultural Identity And Continuity At The Missions Of New Spain: Examining The Native American Experience At The Spanish Missions Of Texas, William E. Altizer

Nebraska Anthropologist

The Roman Catholic missions of New Spain were an essential component of the Spanish colonial enterprise, and the effects of the missionization process on the Native American populations of the Americas were profound. How did these native populations respond to the new imperatives of colonization and religious conversion? In what ways were they able to maintain their cultural identity under the mission system? This paper examines the ways in which archaeology can address these questions of cultural continuity, with particular emphasis on the eighteenth-century Spanish missions of San Antonio, Texas.


The Influence Of Refugee Status On Palestinian Identity And The Impact Of Identity On Durable Solutions To The Refugee Problem, Michaela S. Clemens Jan 2007

The Influence Of Refugee Status On Palestinian Identity And The Impact Of Identity On Durable Solutions To The Refugee Problem, Michaela S. Clemens

Nebraska Anthropologist

Over the last fifty years the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has generated massive numbers of refugees. The scale and longevity of the conflict has made the Palestinian refugee problem the most protracted and largest refugee situation in the world today (Merhab et al. 2006). The processes of becoming a refugee and living as a refugee have had direct impacts on the formation of Palestinian identity. In this paper, I examine the influence of refugee status on identity and discuss how this identity affects potential solutions to the protracted refugee situation. I offer a brief historical background to the creation of Palestinian refugees ...


Getting Your Hands A Little Less Dirty: An Exercise In Using Geophysics To Understand Hopewell Earthwork Construction, Erin C. Dempsey Jan 2007

Getting Your Hands A Little Less Dirty: An Exercise In Using Geophysics To Understand Hopewell Earthwork Construction, Erin C. Dempsey

Nebraska Anthropologist

Hopewellian earthworks are extremely complex in their make-up and indicate precise and planned soil placement by participants in the Hopewell culture. As such, recent research at the Hopeton Earthworks in Chillicothe, Ohio has focused on understanding how earthworks were constructed. Eight backhoe trenches excavated through the earthwork walls have revealed intricate and diverse soil stratigraphy. However, researchers do not yet know where the soils originated; this study aims to answer that question. To accomplish this, magnetic susceptibility testing was conducted on soil cores taken from in and around the earthworks. These results are compared to susceptibility testing results done on ...