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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Childhood, Marcia Mikulak Dec 2005

Childhood, Marcia Mikulak

Anthropology Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Place(S) Of Moldovanka In The Making Of Odessa, Tanya Richardson Oct 2005

The Place(S) Of Moldovanka In The Making Of Odessa, Tanya Richardson

Anthropology Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Patrilateral Bias Among A Traditionally Egalitarian People: Ju/'Hoansi Naming Practice, Patricia Draper, Christine Haney Jul 2005

Patrilateral Bias Among A Traditionally Egalitarian People: Ju/'Hoansi Naming Practice, Patricia Draper, Christine Haney

Anthropology Faculty Publications

The Ju/'hoansi (!Kung) of Namibia and Botswana are unusual for the strong norm to name children exclusively for kin and primarily for grandparents. Naming carries important significance by linking the two namesakes and because names are a basis for extending fictive kin links. In the 1950s Lorna Marshall reported that the father has the right to name children and that he "invariably" named them for the paternal grandparents, although having the option of naming children born later for his wife's parents. The authors used a large database of genealogical information that was collected nearly concurrently with Marshall's ...


A Protocol For The Staining Of Cement Lines In Adult Human Bone Using Toluidine Blue, Daniel L. Osborne, Janene Curtis Jun 2005

A Protocol For The Staining Of Cement Lines In Adult Human Bone Using Toluidine Blue, Daniel L. Osborne, Janene Curtis

Anthropology Faculty Publications

Increased definition of cement lines aids in the identification of secondary osteons in bone. A staining protocol taken from Burr (Anat Rec 232:180-189, 1991) and modified by Havill using toluidine blue on plastic-embedded bone specimens was applied to cranial core and femoral shaft sections but proved to be too time-consuming and inconsistent. Experimentation resulted in a different protocol for each bone type, perhaps as the result of differences in section thickness and cortical area. Staining of femoral sections proved particularly difficult, with increased etching duration and agitation proving most influential in intensity and uniformity of stain.


Warriors Of Paros: Soldiers’ Burials Offer Clues To The Rise Of Classical Greek City-States, Foteini Zafeiropoulou, P.A. Agelarakis Jan 2005

Warriors Of Paros: Soldiers’ Burials Offer Clues To The Rise Of Classical Greek City-States, Foteini Zafeiropoulou, P.A. Agelarakis

Anthropology Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Women’S Health: Attitudes And Practices In North Carolina, Jennie E. Burnet Jan 2005

Women’S Health: Attitudes And Practices In North Carolina, Jennie E. Burnet

Anthropology Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Diary Of A District Officer: Alastair Morrison's 1953 Trip To The Kelabit Highlands, Matthew H. Amster Jan 2005

The Diary Of A District Officer: Alastair Morrison's 1953 Trip To The Kelabit Highlands, Matthew H. Amster

Anthropology Faculty Publications

In 1953, Alastair Morrison, then acting District Officer for the Bara, traveled to the Kelabit Highlands along with his wife, photographer Hedda Morrison, and ever changing entourage of 'coolie" porters and guides. This journey was part of his regular responsibilities as a District Officer. During such tours, Morrison surveyed longhouse communities and collected information about the local population and spoke to people about government policies, school fees, taxes, the registering of guns, and often sought to resolve local disputes. Such journeys were summarized in formal reports. However, Morrison also kept travel notebooks, which he later used to write his memoir ...


Co-Wife Conflict And Cooperation, William R. Jankowiak, Monika Sudakov, Benjamin C. Wilreker Jan 2005

Co-Wife Conflict And Cooperation, William R. Jankowiak, Monika Sudakov, Benjamin C. Wilreker

Anthropology Faculty Publications

Conventional wisdom holds that the polygynous family system is as sexually and emotionally satisfying as a monogamous one. Ethnographic accounts of 69 polygynous systems, however, provide compelling evidence that the majority of co-wives in a polygynous family prefer pragmatic co-operation with one another while maintaining a respectful distance. Moreover, there often is a deep-seated feeling of angst that arises over competing for access to their mutual husband. Co-wife conflict in the early years of marriage is pervasive, and often marked by outbursts of verbal or physical violence. Co-wife conflict may be mitigated by social institutions, such as sororal polygyny and ...