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Anthropology

The University of Maine

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Articles 1 - 30 of 434

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

The Need For Discipline-Based Education Research In Archaeology, Carol E. Colaninno Oct 2019

The Need For Discipline-Based Education Research In Archaeology, Carol E. Colaninno

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Over the last few decades, scholars have recognized the importance of discipline-based education research (DBER). As outlined by the National Research Council of the National Academies, DBER aims to 1) understand how students learn discipline concepts, practices, and ways of thinking; 2) understand how students develop expertise; 3) identify and measure learning objectives and forms of instruction that advance students towards those objectives; 4) contribute knowledge that can transform instruction; and 5) identify approaches to make education broad and inclusive. Physicists, chemists, engineers, biologists, astronomers, and geoscientists have been among the first to adopt DBER. Given research that demonstrates the ...


Mya Arenaria And Oxygen Isotopes: An Analysis To Suggest Season Of Occupation At Holmes Point East (62-6), Holmes Point West (62-8), And Joves Cove (44-13), Maine, Emily Blackwood Aug 2019

Mya Arenaria And Oxygen Isotopes: An Analysis To Suggest Season Of Occupation At Holmes Point East (62-6), Holmes Point West (62-8), And Joves Cove (44-13), Maine, Emily Blackwood

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The ratio of oxygen isotopes (ẟ18O) derived from archaeological bivalves can be used to suggest whether a site was occupied seasonally or year-round. To address the question of seasonality at three archaeological shell midden sites along the coast of Maine, modern samples of the soft-shelled clam, Mya arenaria, were collected from tidal mudflats associated with each site once a month for one year. An average of six modern shells per month were analyzed with their resulting ẟ18O values used to establish monthly ranges to which the archaeological samples of Mya arenaria were assigned; association of the archaeological shells to a ...


Teaching With Technology: Digital Tools For Archaeological Education, Caroline Gardiner Jul 2019

Teaching With Technology: Digital Tools For Archaeological Education, Caroline Gardiner

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Recent technological advances have greatly altered how scholars record, study, and educate the public about cultural resources. Data can now be instantly recorded, analyzed, and widely shared. Digital tools can help create multimedia, interactive products that have contributed greatly to education and outreach initiatives worldwide.

Both the National Park Service (NPS) and the National Council for Preservation Education (NCPE) are dedicated to studying, preserving, and educating the public about cultural resources. A recent internship project between these two institutions produced online lesson plans that educated students about cultural materials and the various methodologies scholars use to study them within archaeology ...


Service Learning In Archaeology And Its Impact On Perceptions Of Cultural Heritage And Historic Preservation, Kyle P. Freund, Laura K. Clark, Kevin Gidusko May 2019

Service Learning In Archaeology And Its Impact On Perceptions Of Cultural Heritage And Historic Preservation, Kyle P. Freund, Laura K. Clark, Kevin Gidusko

Journal of Archaeology and Education

This paper focuses on a for-credit cemetery recording class taught at Indian River State College (IRSC) and on the impact of the project on student perceptions of cultural heritage and historic preservation. One of the goals in creating this service learning course was to promote student awareness of the destructive risks that many historic cemeteries face and to impart the importance of stewardship over the archaeological record. To assess the effectiveness of the course in meeting this goal, a series of five interviews with students enrolled in the class were conducted to get participants to discuss their motivations and perceptions ...


The Alma College Archaeological Project: Toward A Community-Based Pedagogy, Kristin Landau Apr 2019

The Alma College Archaeological Project: Toward A Community-Based Pedagogy, Kristin Landau

Journal of Archaeology and Education

The turn toward community-based research in archaeology is “transforming” the discipline. No longer can we show up with screens and trowels wielding government permits and expect to start digging. Community-based archaeological projects may never even get to the excavation phase if local collaborators are uninterested or have other priorities. Now that collaboration with local populations has become standard archaeological practice, it is imperative to begin incorporating community engagement into traditional field schools. Today’s archaeology requires grassroots organizing, cultural awareness, and sensitive listening skills, in addition to digging square holes and drawing tree roots to scale. In this paper, I ...


2019 Film Series: Human Dimensions Of Climate Change, Jennifer Bonnet, Cindy Isenhour Apr 2019

2019 Film Series: Human Dimensions Of Climate Change, Jennifer Bonnet, Cindy Isenhour

Library Staff Publications

In the spring of 2019, Jen Bonnet and Cindy Isenhour coordinated the sixth annual Human Dimensions of Climate Change film series, sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Climate Change Institute, Fogler Library, and the Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions. Each week for three weeks a different film was shown, followed by a discussion with campus scholars. A library exhibit accompanied the series and highlighted a wide range of resources related to the topic. This poster represents the series.


Beyond The Sugar Shack: How Non-Financial Forms Of Capital Are Conceptualized By Small- And Medium-Scale Maine Maple Syrup Producers, Skye Siladi Apr 2019

Beyond The Sugar Shack: How Non-Financial Forms Of Capital Are Conceptualized By Small- And Medium-Scale Maine Maple Syrup Producers, Skye Siladi

Honors College

Why do people farm? The answers are increasingly unclear given the heightened pressure of agricultural consolidation on small family farms. When profit margins are thin or even non-existent it is necessary to look at how other factors influence this group of people – particularly the social and cultural ties within and amongst communities that inspire people to remain in a profession which is not particularly lucrative This paper explores conceptualizations of social, cultural, and natural wealth as rationales for continuing in agricultural work, by focusing on maple syrup producers in Maine. At the small and medium-scale, maple syrup production cannot provide ...


Migrant Farm Work In The State Of Maine: Meeting The Community Needs Of Maine's Working Immigrant Population, Olivia Ruhlin Apr 2019

Migrant Farm Work In The State Of Maine: Meeting The Community Needs Of Maine's Working Immigrant Population, Olivia Ruhlin

Honors College

The purpose of this thesis is to create a greater awareness about the community of migrant farm workers who have either settled in Maine’s Downeast regions, or travel to Maine seasonally for work. I have aimed to focus my research on developing answers to the following questions: why do people choose to migrate? What do Maine’s agricultural industries have to offer for a migrant farm worker? What challenges do they face? What challenges do the community of immigrants who choose to stay in Maine face? Are these communities underprivileged, and if so, what organizations are working to facilitate ...


Putting Archaeology And Anthropology Into Schools: A 2019 Update, Colleen P. Popson, Ruth O. Selig Mar 2019

Putting Archaeology And Anthropology Into Schools: A 2019 Update, Colleen P. Popson, Ruth O. Selig

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Our 2012 article, “Putting Anthropology Into Schools,” argued that integrating anthropology and archaeology into K-12 schools must involve teacher preparation, state certification requirements, and in-service training. National anthropology and archaeology organizations’ decades-long push for the integration of their disciplines into schools was outlined but assessed as relatively limited compared to successful efforts in psychology, sociology, and economics. Some progress did occur, traced primarily to the National Science Foundation and other funders, alongside committed individuals with well-developed curriculum materials. Our 2019 publication includes the original article followed by an UPDATE outlining developments since 2012. Reports from the National Academies and the ...


Archaeology In The Classroom At A New England Prep School, Ryan Wheeler Feb 2019

Archaeology In The Classroom At A New England Prep School, Ryan Wheeler

Journal of Archaeology and Education

In 1901 Robert S. Peabody lamented the lack of instruction in archaeology at his high school alma mater Phillips Academy, a prestigious New England boarding school. To rectify the situation, he used family funds and artifacts amassed by his personal curator Warren K. Moorehead to establish a Department of Archaeology at the school. A building was constructed and Moorehead and Peabody’s son, Charles, set about teaching classes. The pattern established by Moorehead and Peabody, however, was disrupted in 1914 when the school refocused the program exclusively on research. Classes were offered periodically over the next decades, and some students ...


Incorporating Field Excavations In Introduction To Archaeology, Rebecca M. Dean Feb 2019

Incorporating Field Excavations In Introduction To Archaeology, Rebecca M. Dean

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Most archaeology students first experience field work during a field school aimed at upper-division undergraduate majors. An excavation component in an Introduction to Archaeology class, however, can create an unequaled educational experience for students at all levels of experience and interest in archaeology. Excavations help students to master basic field methods, understand the nature of archaeological inference, recognize the strengths and limitations of archaeological data, grapple with archaeological ethics, and foster a sense of archaeological stewardship. This paper explores the outcomes of providing a field experience in the introductory class at the University of Minnesota Morris, the liberal arts campus ...


On Materiality And Meaning: Ethnographic Engagements With Reuse, Repair & Care, Cindy Isenhour, Joshua Reno Jan 2019

On Materiality And Meaning: Ethnographic Engagements With Reuse, Repair & Care, Cindy Isenhour, Joshua Reno

Anthropology Faculty Scholarship

The reimagination and revaluation of discarded goods, through repair and reuse is, for many, a quotidian and mundane element of everyday life. These practices are the historical precedent and continue to be the stuff of common sense for a significant portion of human society. And yet, reuse, repair and other elements of a ‘circular economy’ have recently emerged as a significant focus in environmental and economic policy. Proponents claim that reuse practices represent a potentially radical alternative to mainstream consumer culture and a form of carework that generates new social possibilities and personal affects. This essay explores the myriad dimensions ...


Rummaging Through The Attic Of New England, Brieanne Berry, Jennifer Bonnet, Cindy Isenhour Jan 2019

Rummaging Through The Attic Of New England, Brieanne Berry, Jennifer Bonnet, Cindy Isenhour

Anthropology Student Scholarship

The concept of the circular economy has taken off, gaining momentum along with concerns about resource depletion, waste, and the impending ‘end of cheap nature’ (Moore 2014). Environmentalists and industrialists alike have promoted the benefits of reuse as a means toward improved efficiency and reduced resource pressure. Some have called for a new ‘culture of reuse’ (Botsman and Rogers 2010; Stokes et al. 2014). It is in this context that we explore repair, resale, and reuse as practices with deep historical precedent and contemporary continuity. Are there lessons to be learned from places that are already home to circular economies ...


What College Students Learn From Teaching Others, Larkin N. Hood Dec 2018

What College Students Learn From Teaching Others, Larkin N. Hood

Journal of Archaeology and Education

This article describes what undergraduate students learned from participating in a museum docent program at a large, public university on the West Coast of the United States. The majority (93%) of students report an increase in their ability to effectively communicate specialized knowledge to museum visitors in one or more of the following ways: 1) identifying what visitors know and adjusting their explanations accordingly; 2) translating technical information to visitors; 3); communicating information in an active, hands-on manner; 4) confidently communicating their knowledge to others. Students reported personal and professional benefits as well. In addition to this focused observation approach ...


Key To The Past: Community Perceptions Of Yup’Ik Youth Interaction With Culturally Relevant Education Inspired By The Nunalleq Archaeology Project, Sean R. O'Rourke, Justin J. Turner, Krista Ritchie Nov 2018

Key To The Past: Community Perceptions Of Yup’Ik Youth Interaction With Culturally Relevant Education Inspired By The Nunalleq Archaeology Project, Sean R. O'Rourke, Justin J. Turner, Krista Ritchie

Journal of Archaeology and Education

This study qualitatively describes a) the implementation of culturally relevant education (CRE) programs for Yup’ik youth in Quinhagak, Alaska that developed from the Nunalleq Project—a nearby archaeological excavation—and b) community members’ and program facilitators’ perceptions of associated youth social and psychological outcomes. Ten semi-structured interviews (seven community members, three program facilitators) were undertaken and analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Community members and program facilitators attributed numerous outcomes to the Nunalleq-related CRE, such as imparting practical skills (e.g., wilderness survival, artistic and technological skills), teaching young people to value their heritage (e.g., educating them about the ...


Say What?: Demystifying Discourse Analysis For Archaeology Students, Cynthia L. Van Gilder Jun 2018

Say What?: Demystifying Discourse Analysis For Archaeology Students, Cynthia L. Van Gilder

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Most archaeology instructors are eager to have their students appreciate that the study of the past is relevant to the present. In fact, most current introductory textbooks include a section, however brief it may be, on the socio-politics of archaeology. These discussions are usually framed around how ideas about the past have been used to justify abuse (e.g., Nazi archaeology to support an Aryan homeland), or how the involvement of descendant communities in research is now considered best practice in the field (e.g., NAGPRA, community based archaeology). One of the most powerful tools for understanding how what we ...


Utilizing Ground-Penetrating Radar In The Delineation And Cultural Resource Management Of Eroding Maine Coastal Shell Middens, Jacquelynn F. Miller May 2018

Utilizing Ground-Penetrating Radar In The Delineation And Cultural Resource Management Of Eroding Maine Coastal Shell Middens, Jacquelynn F. Miller

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Shell middens along the Maine coast archive up to 5000 years of cultural and climatic change, but the record is continually and rapidly lost to the sea through climate-driven coastal erosion and sea-level rise. These sites were constructed by the ancestors of Maine Tribes, and are composed of centimeters to meters of clam (Mya arenaria) and/or oyster (Crassostrea virginica) shells, other faunal remains, and cultural materials. Shell middens record human interaction with the environment and early coastal occupation and adaptation. The faunal remains reflect paleoenvironmental conditions and the distribution of extinct and extant forage-species along the western Gulf of ...


Barriers To Employment And Overcoming Economic Integration Challenges For Foreign-Born Workers In Maine, Cleo Barker May 2018

Barriers To Employment And Overcoming Economic Integration Challenges For Foreign-Born Workers In Maine, Cleo Barker

Honors College

With increasing globalization, more people are moving across borders and between countries than ever before. Immigrants often come to the United States to create better lives for themselves and take advantage of the opportunities available. Yet for skilled immigrants this is often an idealistic goal, since there are many barriers to employment that prevent these individuals from working in their professional fields. Through a mixed methods approach encompassing case studies from literature, original survey data, and insights drawn from interviews and discussions, this thesis investigates the different barriers to employment for foreign-born workers in Maine, and provides recommendations for addressing ...


From Grey City To Metropolitan Icon: Basque Cultural Revival And Urban Redevelopment In Bilbao, Spain, Kaylie Gazura May 2018

From Grey City To Metropolitan Icon: Basque Cultural Revival And Urban Redevelopment In Bilbao, Spain, Kaylie Gazura

Honors College

After decades of political oppression and industrial decline, the Basque people of Bilbao, Spain sought to incorporate cultural revival into their urban redevelopment. The redevelopment in Bilbao, Spain is recognized all over the world. Bilbao is an icon to those who hope to revitalize their post-industrial city. This paper looks to understand why this reurbanization was so successful and to determine how the Basque people implemented their culture, history, and identity into their new post-industrial and post-dictatorial space. I will be discussing the history of both the Basque Country and Bilbao to provide context for the redevelopment. Additionally, I will ...


2018 Film Series: Human Dimensions Of Climate Change, Jennifer Bonnet, Cindy Isenhour Apr 2018

2018 Film Series: Human Dimensions Of Climate Change, Jennifer Bonnet, Cindy Isenhour

Anthropology Faculty Scholarship

In the spring of 2018, Cindy Isenhour and Jen Bonnet coordinated the fifth annual Human Dimensions of Climate Change film series, sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Climate Change Institute, Maine Island Institute, School of Education and Human Development, and Fogler Library. Each week for three weeks a different film was shown, followed by discussion with campus scholars. A library exhibit accompanied the series and highlighted a wide range of resources related to the topic. This poster represents the series.


Digital Bridges Across Disciplinary, Practical And Pedagogical Divides: An Online Professional Master’S Program In Heritage Resource Management, John R. Welch, David V. Burley, Jonathan C. Driver, Erin A. Hogg, Kanthi Jayasundera, Michael Klassen, David Maxwell, George P. Nicholas, Janet Pivnick, Christopher D. Dore Feb 2018

Digital Bridges Across Disciplinary, Practical And Pedagogical Divides: An Online Professional Master’S Program In Heritage Resource Management, John R. Welch, David V. Burley, Jonathan C. Driver, Erin A. Hogg, Kanthi Jayasundera, Michael Klassen, David Maxwell, George P. Nicholas, Janet Pivnick, Christopher D. Dore

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Growth and diversification in heritage resource management (HRM) archaeology since the 1960s have created new demands for training the next generations of HRM leaders and for addressing persistent and counterproductive divisions between academic and applied archaeologies. The Simon Fraser University Department of Archaeology (SFU) has responded to these demands with an all-new, cohort-based, thesis-focused graduate program created by and for HRM professionals. The program’s target audience is HRM practitioners who hold Bachelor’s credentials, have initiated promising careers in HRM, and desire advanced, research-focused degrees to enable their professional capacity and upward mobility. The SFU program is structured and ...


Teaching Bones From My Garden, John C. Whittaker Jan 2018

Teaching Bones From My Garden, John C. Whittaker

Journal of Archaeology and Education

Abstract

Faunal analysis, or zooarchaeology, is an important subfield that provides information on human ecology, economy, culture, and society. Few of my students have much experience with hunting, farming, anatomy, or even eating meat these days, so faunal analysis labs in an Archaeological Field Methods class present some difficulties.

Faunal assemblages from archaeological sites are often small, fragile, and too valuable for class use. They require good comparative collections, and it may be difficult for students to relate to unfamiliar animals and cultures.

These problems can be overcome by producing a faunal teaching assemblage from home meat consumption. For over ...


Letter From Robert E. Pike, 1938, Robert E. Pike Jan 2018

Letter From Robert E. Pike, 1938, Robert E. Pike

Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers

A letter from Robert E. Pike of the State Teachers College, Minot, North Dakota requesting any information about epitaphs on Indian graves in the Orono/Oldtown area. Digitized from Box 1 Folder 80 of the Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers.


Letter To Mary Cabot Wheelright 1930, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Jan 2018

Letter To Mary Cabot Wheelright 1930, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm

Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers

A letter to Miss Wheelwright regarding silver jewelry and other items for sale by Mrs. Littlefield and Lewey Mitchell. Digitized from Box 1, Folder 143 of the Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers.


Book Review Of Antiquities Of The New England Indians 1936, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Jan 2018

Book Review Of Antiquities Of The New England Indians 1936, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm

Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers

Original draft of a book review of Antiquities of the New England Indians: with Notes on the Ancient Cultures of the Adjacent Territory by Charles C. Willoughby. Published in the New England Quarterly.

Digitized from Box 2, Folder 1, of the Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers.

Eckstorm, Fannie Hardy. “The New England Quarterly.” The New England Quarterly, vol. 9, no. 2, 1936, pp. 346–348. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/360403.


Two Unpublished Stories By Fannie Hardy Eckstorm, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Jan 2018

Two Unpublished Stories By Fannie Hardy Eckstorm, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm

Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers

Two unpublished stories by Eckstorm, "Concerning the Questionable Loyalty of Big Sabattis" and "On Oldtown Falls". The stories are undated. Digitized from Box 2, Folder 20, of the Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers. Documents that did not pertain to Native Americans in Maine were not digitized and were not included in this file.


Maine Indian Legends 1917, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Jan 2018

Maine Indian Legends 1917, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm

Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers

Notes for a lecture delivered before a club in Bucksport about 1917. Stories about Glooscap and the animals. Digitized from Box 2, Folder 21, of the Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers.


Maine Indian Folk-Lore 1919, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Jan 2018

Maine Indian Folk-Lore 1919, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm

Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers

Notes for a lecture recounting Abenaki mythology. Delivered before the Foxcroft Club 1919. Digitized from Box 2, Folder 22, of the Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers.


Photo Of Joseph Attien With Description - Undated, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Jan 2018

Photo Of Joseph Attien With Description - Undated, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm

Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers

A photograph of Chief Joseph Attien of the Penobscots together with a hand-written description. Digitized from Box 4, Folder 35, of the Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers. Documents that did not pertain to Native Americans in Maine were not digitized and were not included in this file.


Photographs Of Joseph Francis 1912, A F. Orr Jan 2018

Photographs Of Joseph Francis 1912, A F. Orr

Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers

Two photographs of Fannie Hardy Eckstorm's friend Joseph Francis of the Penobscot Tribe. Dated 1912. Digitized from Box 4, Folder 44, of the Fannie Hardy Eckstorm Papers.