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Anthropology

Portland State University

Social archaeology

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Using Bone Fragmentation Records To Investigate Coastal Human Ecodynamics: A Case Study From Čḯxwicən (Washington State, Usa), Kristine M. Bovy, Michael A. Etnier, Virginia L. Butler, Sarah K. Campbell, Jennie Deo Shaw Feb 2019

Using Bone Fragmentation Records To Investigate Coastal Human Ecodynamics: A Case Study From Čḯxwicən (Washington State, Usa), Kristine M. Bovy, Michael A. Etnier, Virginia L. Butler, Sarah K. Campbell, Jennie Deo Shaw

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Coastal shell middens are known for their generally excellent preservation and abundant identifiable faunal remains, including delicate fish and bird bones that are often rare or poorly preserved at non-shell midden sites. Thus, when we began our human ecodynamics research project focused on the fauna from Čḯxwicən (45CA523, pronounced ch-WHEET-son), a large ancestral village of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, located on the shore of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Port Angeles, Washington (USA), we anticipated generally high levels of bone identifiability. We quickly realized that the mammal bones were more fragmented and less identifiable than we ...


Unearthing Childhood: The Archeology Of Children In North America, Christine S A Vigeant Aug 2017

Unearthing Childhood: The Archeology Of Children In North America, Christine S A Vigeant

Anthós

The Archaeology of Childhood is a relatively recent focus of archaeological inquiry. An interest in prehistoric childhood comes on the heels of and as a necessary extension of feminist archaeology (Baxter 2008). Archaeological research in the past has largely ignored prehistoric children, or considered them only in the context of site formation processes or child burials (Schwartzman 2006). This neglect of prehistoric children was due to a belief that children were invisible in the archaeological record, because of their unpredictable behavior and their inactivity in the world of adults. They were thought to be passive participants rather than active influencers ...


Comments On The Emergence And Persistence Of Inequality In Premodern Societies, Kenneth M. Ames Feb 2010

Comments On The Emergence And Persistence Of Inequality In Premodern Societies, Kenneth M. Ames

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

The author discusses the development and persistence of permanent inequality in human societies. He comments on an article which undertakes inequality in premodern societies and proposed that intergenerational wealth transmission is the reason for the evolution and persistence of inequality, mentioning the three categories of wealth including material, relational, and embodied.


Cultural Vulnerability And Resilience In The Arctic: Preliminary Report On Archeological Fieldwork At Cape Krusenstern, Northwest Alaska, Shelby L. Anderson, Adam Freeburg, Ben Fitzhugh Jan 2009

Cultural Vulnerability And Resilience In The Arctic: Preliminary Report On Archeological Fieldwork At Cape Krusenstern, Northwest Alaska, Shelby L. Anderson, Adam Freeburg, Ben Fitzhugh

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

While natural scientists track environmental change in response to global warming, less attention has been directed towards human interface with long term Arctic environmental dynamics. Current research at Cape Krusenstern, Alaska, seeks to address this deficit through investigation of human-environmental interactions recorded in archeological and paleoenvironmental data spanning the last 4,000-5,000 years at the Cape, building on the pioneering work conducted at Krusenstern by J. Louis Giddings and Douglas D. Anderson. Systematic survey and use of new mapping technology to record cultural and natural features are methods central to addressing these research questions. Discovery of new archeological features ...