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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Anthropology

Portland State University

Animal remains (Archaeology) -- Pacific Northwest

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Age Determination Of Modern And Archaeological Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus Tshawytcha) Using Vertebrae, Anthony Raymond Hofkamp Mar 2015

Age Determination Of Modern And Archaeological Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus Tshawytcha) Using Vertebrae, Anthony Raymond Hofkamp

Dissertations and Theses

Incremental growth rings in X-rays of salmon vertebrae have been used since the 1980s to age Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) remains from archaeological sites in the Pacific Northwest. These age estimates, paired with generalized life history patterns, have been used to determine salmon species, season of capture and in turn season of site occupation. This approach relies on a variety of assumptions, the most fundamental of which is that rings represent true years. Archaeologists using vertebral age determination techniques have failed to adequately test this assumption and present their methodologies. This thesis assesses the validity of using incremental growth structures ...


Subsistence Variability On The Columbia Plateau, Ricky Gilmer Atwell Jan 1989

Subsistence Variability On The Columbia Plateau, Ricky Gilmer Atwell

Dissertations and Theses

Long-term human dietary change is a poorly understood aspect of Columbia Plateau prehistory. Faunal assemblages from thirty-four archaeological sites on the Plateau are organized into fifteen aggregate assemblages that are defined spatially and temporally. These assemblages are examined in terms of a focal-diffuse model using ecological measures of diversity, richness and evenness. Variability and patterning in the prehistoric subsistence record is indicated. Major trends in human diet and shifts in subsistence economies are documented and the relationship between subsistence and some initial semi-sedentary adaptations on the Plateau is clarified.