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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Incidence Of An Astronaut Not Closing The Pressure Garment Visor On Reentry, Cameron M. Smith Dec 2015

Incidence Of An Astronaut Not Closing The Pressure Garment Visor On Reentry, Cameron M. Smith

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Audiovisual records of a Project Mercury pilot's activities during an orbital flight indicate that his visor was left open during reentry and descent to the sea surface, phases of flight during which cabin pressure loss was to be mitigated by suit pressurization; however the suit could not have been pressurized with the visor open. Thus, for a presently unknown reason, a critical safety step—sealing the visor and making a pressure suit integrity test before re-entry—was overlooked in this flight, a fact itself unreported in any flight review or historical documents known to the author. The lesson is ...


Migrant Remittances, Population Ageing And Intergenerational Family Obligations In Sri Lanka, Michele Ruth Gamburd May 2015

Migrant Remittances, Population Ageing And Intergenerational Family Obligations In Sri Lanka, Michele Ruth Gamburd

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

As Sri Lanka’s population ages, its migrant women face a difficult choice: should they work abroad to remit money to provision their families, or should they stay at home to look after elderly kin? Although numerous studies have explored migration’s effects on children, fewer works focus on issues of elder care. This essay presents contextualizing information on transnational migration from Sri Lanka and the rapid ageing that is transforming the country’s population structure from a pyramid with many youth and few elders into a column. Using qualitative ethnographic data gathered from a labour-sending village in southern Sri ...


Conceptualizing Risk And Effectiveness: A Qualitative Study Of Women’S And Providers’ Perceptions Of Nonsurgical Female Permanent Contraception, Elizabeth K. Harrington, Diane Gordon, Isabel Osgood-Roach, Jeffrey T. Jensen, Jennifer Aengst Mar 2015

Conceptualizing Risk And Effectiveness: A Qualitative Study Of Women’S And Providers’ Perceptions Of Nonsurgical Female Permanent Contraception, Elizabeth K. Harrington, Diane Gordon, Isabel Osgood-Roach, Jeffrey T. Jensen, Jennifer Aengst

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Objective: Novel approaches to nonsurgical permanent contraception (NSPC) for women that are low cost and require no incision or hysteroscope/surgical equipment could improve access to, and the acceptability of permanent contraception (PC). To better understand opportunities and limitations for NSPC approaches, we examined women's and OB/GYN providers' perceptions of NSPC in Portland, OR.

Study Design: Semi-structured, qualitative interviews were conducted with 40 women recruited from outpatient clinics with purposive sampling, and a focus group was conducted with 9 OB/GYNs in academic and community practice. Transcripts were coded and inductively analyzed with a grounded theory approach.

Results ...


Interest In Nonsurgical Female Permanent Contraception Among Men In Portland, Oregon And Eastern Maharashtra, India, Elizabeth K. Harrington, Diane Gordon, Pramod Bahulekar, B.S. Garg, Isabel Osgood-Roach, Jeffrey T. Jensen, Jennifer Aengst Mar 2015

Interest In Nonsurgical Female Permanent Contraception Among Men In Portland, Oregon And Eastern Maharashtra, India, Elizabeth K. Harrington, Diane Gordon, Pramod Bahulekar, B.S. Garg, Isabel Osgood-Roach, Jeffrey T. Jensen, Jennifer Aengst

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Objective: We examined the men’s attitudes and perceptions toward the concept of nonsurgical female permanent contraception (NSPC), or novel approaches to permanent contraception (PC) that do not require incisions or surgical equipment/hysteroscope.

Study design: Cross-sectional survey of married/partnered men in Portland, OR and rural eastern Maharashtra, India. Descriptive analysis was performed.

Results: In India (N=150), most men (80%) anticipated their partners would undergo PC in the future, compared to 30% in Portland (N=170). About a third (39.6% in India, 82% in Portland) reported being uncomfortable with PC for partners due to the need for ...


Pressure Test Results Regarding Convolute Elbow Segments And Biomedical Monitoring, Cameron M. Smith Feb 2015

Pressure Test Results Regarding Convolute Elbow Segments And Biomedical Monitoring, Cameron M. Smith

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Pacific Spaceflight’s Mark II / III pressure garment (model Gagarin with one newly-built elbow segment on the left arm) was pressurized to evaluate the mobility allowed by the newly-installed convolute arm compared to the right arm’s older convolute elbow segment. Additionally a new helmet hold-down cable system was tested, as well as the C02 scrubbing system and heart rate, Sp02, suit’s exhausted gas C02 levels and a new communication system. At pressures of 2.3psi – 2.5psi the helmet hold-down cable came free of the new hardware (a sailboat’s one-way cleat system), raising the helmet ring explosively ...


Stable Isotope And Ancient Dna Analysis Of Dog Remains From Cathlapotle (45cl1), A Contact-Era Site On The Lower Columbia River, Kenneth M. Ames, Michael P. Richards, Camilla F. Speller, Dongya Y. Yang, R. Lee Lyman, Virginia L. Butler Feb 2015

Stable Isotope And Ancient Dna Analysis Of Dog Remains From Cathlapotle (45cl1), A Contact-Era Site On The Lower Columbia River, Kenneth M. Ames, Michael P. Richards, Camilla F. Speller, Dongya Y. Yang, R. Lee Lyman, Virginia L. Butler

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

This study reports ancient DNA (aDNA) and stable isotope analyses of eight dog skeletal elements from the Cathlapotle site on the Lower Columbia River of the western United States. The aDNA analysis confirmed the elements as dogs (Canis lupus familiaris). Two haplotypes were found, both of which group within dog Clade A, and have patchy distributions to the north in British Columbia and as far south as Teotihuacan (Mexico). The isotopic analysis showed that the dogs’ dietary protein was derived almost exclusively from marine sources. Lower Columbia River ethnohistoric accounts and Cathlapotle zooarchaeological records indicate that while marine fish were ...


The Changing World In Microcosm: The Dying Languages Of Liberia, Sierra Leone, And Guinea, George Tucker Childs Jan 2015

The Changing World In Microcosm: The Dying Languages Of Liberia, Sierra Leone, And Guinea, George Tucker Childs

Applied Linguistics Faculty Publications and Presentations

Observers have become increasingly aware of how the world is changing due to the forces of globalization, be it in the form of neo-colonialism, the scramble for natural resources, or the various extractive industries. The recent alarm over Ebola illustrated another pernicious fallout of increased communication and travel. The effect of globalization has also been great on indigenous peoples and their cultures, in particular on what many consider to be an integral component of culture, the local languages.

I report on recent research devoted to the documentation of endangered languages in Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia (the Ebola countries). Most ...


Archéologie Du Cap Espenberg Où La Question Du Birnirk Et De L’Origine Du Thulé Dans Le Nord‐Ouest De L’Alaska, Claire Alix, Owen K. Mason, Nancy H. Bigelow, Shelby L. Anderson, Jeffrey Rasic, John F. Hoffecker Jan 2015

Archéologie Du Cap Espenberg Où La Question Du Birnirk Et De L’Origine Du Thulé Dans Le Nord‐Ouest De L’Alaska, Claire Alix, Owen K. Mason, Nancy H. Bigelow, Shelby L. Anderson, Jeffrey Rasic, John F. Hoffecker

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Résumé en français

Le cap Espenberg est une flèche littorale au large de la mer des Tchouktches dans le nord‐ouest de l’Alaska contenant les vestiges de 4000 ans d’occupations humaines et de changements climatiques. Les recherches archéologiques et paléoenvironnementales qui sont menées depuis 2009 dans le cadre d’un projet pluridisciplinaire apportent des informations nouvelles sur la chronologie des occupations du dernier millénaire et documente l’émergence de la culture thuléenne directement antérieure et ancestrale aux Inuit/Inupiat d’aujourd’hui, dans un contexte d’intensification des conditions cycloniques contemporain du petit âge glaciaire. Parallèlement, ces recherches ...


Holocene Settlement History Of The Dundas Islands Archipelago, Northern British Columbia, Bryn Letham, Andrew Martindale, Duncan Mclaren, Thomas Brown, Kenneth M. Ames, David J.W. Archer, Susan Marsden Jan 2015

Holocene Settlement History Of The Dundas Islands Archipelago, Northern British Columbia, Bryn Letham, Andrew Martindale, Duncan Mclaren, Thomas Brown, Kenneth M. Ames, David J.W. Archer, Susan Marsden

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

As this article demonstrates, the Dundas Islands have been home to humans for at least eleven thousand years. This occupation was at times very extensive; this relatively small group of islands was likely home to a population of several thousand people by about two thousand years ago. While geographically on the “outer shores” of Northern Tsimshian traditional territory, these islands were in no way marginal as locations for settlement. We outline the settlement history of the archipelago by presenting the results of the Dundas Islands Archaeological Project, including the radiocarbon dating program results combined with data from three previous small-scale ...


The Bear Creek Site (45ki839), A Late Pleistocene–Holocene Transition Occupation In The Puget Sound Lowland, King County, Washington, Robert E. Kopperl, Amanda K. Taylor, Christian J. Miss, Kenneth M. Ames, Charles M. Hodges Jan 2015

The Bear Creek Site (45ki839), A Late Pleistocene–Holocene Transition Occupation In The Puget Sound Lowland, King County, Washington, Robert E. Kopperl, Amanda K. Taylor, Christian J. Miss, Kenneth M. Ames, Charles M. Hodges

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

The Bear Creek site in Redmond, Washington, yields important information about settlement, subsistence, and technology in the Puget Lowland during the late Pleistocene–Holocene transition. The lithic assemblage is dominated by expedient flake technology, but also contains bifaces and retouched tools. Ongoing analyses focus on site formation, procurement strategies of lithic raw materials, production of flake tools, and technological comparisons of Bear Creek stemmed and concave-base points with other Paleoarchaic technologies of western North America


Yakutat Tlingit And Wrangell-St. Elias National Park And Preserve: An Ethnographic Overview And Assessment, Douglas Deur, Thomas Thornton, Rachel Lahoff, Jamie Hebert Jan 2015

Yakutat Tlingit And Wrangell-St. Elias National Park And Preserve: An Ethnographic Overview And Assessment, Douglas Deur, Thomas Thornton, Rachel Lahoff, Jamie Hebert

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

The National Park Service initiated a series of studies, working in collaboration with park-associated Native communities, to provide basic documentation of the nature of Alaska Native ties to Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The current study represents one of a series of baseline reports on Alaska Native ties to the park. Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve includes parts of the traditional territories of three general Alaska Native groups—the Upper Tanana and Ahtna Athabascans and the Yakutat Tlingit. Prior to the current effort, the park completed ethnographic overviews and assessments in the upper Tanana and Ahtna regions, which ...


Metal And Prestige In The Greater Lower Columbia River Region, Northwestern North America, H. Kory Cooper, Kenneth Ames, Loren G. Davis Jan 2015

Metal And Prestige In The Greater Lower Columbia River Region, Northwestern North America, H. Kory Cooper, Kenneth Ames, Loren G. Davis

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Excavations at the late prehistoric-early historic Chinookan sites of Meier and Cathlapotle in the Greater Lower Columbia Region recovered several hundred metal artifacts. Portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was used initially to quickly determine metal type. Then a sample of copper artifacts was subjected to another round of XRF analysis to identify the presence of native copper and, or, chronologically sensitive copper metals. No native copper artifacts were identified and the lack of Muntz metal, a specific type of brass patented in the 1830s, corroborates the dating of material from both sites as no later than the early historic period. Meier ...