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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Book Review Of, Pushing For Midwives: Homebirth Mothers And The Reproductive Rights Movement, Jennifer Aengst Sep 2011

Book Review Of, Pushing For Midwives: Homebirth Mothers And The Reproductive Rights Movement, Jennifer Aengst

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Reviews the book "Pushing for Midwives: Homebirth Mothers and the Reproductive Rights Movement" by Christa Craven


A Three-Step Method For Teaching The Principles Of Evolution To Non-Biology Major Undergraduates, Cameron M. Smith Jun 2011

A Three-Step Method For Teaching The Principles Of Evolution To Non-Biology Major Undergraduates, Cameron M. Smith

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

A method for teaching the principles of evolution in a 50-minute lecture for undergraduate non-biology majors is described. The method “unpacks” evolution into three observable, factual occurrences: replication (R, reproduction), variation (V, differences between parent and offspring and siblings), and selection (S, nonrandom differential survival of offspring). This method has been particularly effective in demonstrating to students that evolution is the factual, unintended consequence of three independent phenomena (R, V, S).


“Up On The Mountain”: Ethnobotanical Importance Of Montane Sites In Pacific Coastal North America, Nancy J. Turner, Douglas Deur, Carla Rae Mellott Apr 2011

“Up On The Mountain”: Ethnobotanical Importance Of Montane Sites In Pacific Coastal North America, Nancy J. Turner, Douglas Deur, Carla Rae Mellott

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

The Pacific Coastal Mountains of western North America have immense ethnobotanical significance. Since time immemorial, Indigenous Peoples have journeyed from permanent settlements in lowland regions to upland sites in order to harvest and process a range of plant resources –foods, materials and medicines– as well as to hunt and fish, and undertake spiritual activities. Two culturally significant montane areas, widely separated geographically, are described as case examples: pt-e´n’i (Botanie Valley) in Nlaka’pmx territory of southern interior British Columbia, famous for its abundance of edible root resources; and iwamkani, an iconic huckleberry picking location for the Klamath in ...


Book Review Of, Paul Shankman. The Trashing Of Margaret Mead: Anatomy Of An Anthropological Controversy, Michele Ruth Gamburd Feb 2011

Book Review Of, Paul Shankman. The Trashing Of Margaret Mead: Anatomy Of An Anthropological Controversy, Michele Ruth Gamburd

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Reviews the book "The Trashing of Margaret Mead: Anatomy of an Anthropological Controversy," by Paul Shankman.


Can Salmonids (Oncorhynchus Spp.) Be Identified To Species Using Vertebral Morphometrics?, Harriet R. Huber, Jeffery C. Jorgensen, Virginia L. Butler, Greg Baker, Rebecca Stevens Jan 2011

Can Salmonids (Oncorhynchus Spp.) Be Identified To Species Using Vertebral Morphometrics?, Harriet R. Huber, Jeffery C. Jorgensen, Virginia L. Butler, Greg Baker, Rebecca Stevens

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Remains of anadromous Pacific salmon and trout (genus Oncorhynchus) are common in archaeological sites from California to Alaska; however, morphological similarity generally precludes species identification, limiting the range of questions that salmonid remains can address in relation to past human use and ongoing efforts in conservation biology. We developed a relatively simple, rapid, and non-destructive way to classify salmon and trout vertebrae from archaeological contexts to species using length, height and the ratio of length to height. Modern reference material was obtained from all seven anadromous Oncorhynchus species native to the west coast of North America. A minimum of ten ...


What Anthropologists Should Know About The New Evolutionary Synthesis, Cameron M. Smith, Julia Cleverly Ruppell Jan 2011

What Anthropologists Should Know About The New Evolutionary Synthesis, Cameron M. Smith, Julia Cleverly Ruppell

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Discoveries of modern biology are forcing a re-evaluation of even the central pillars of neo- Darwinian evolution. Anthropologists study the processes and results of biological and biocultural evolution, so they must be aware of the scope and nature of these changes in biology. We introduce these changes, comment briefly on how will influence anthropology, and suggest numerous readings to introduce anthropologists to the significance and substance of the new evolutionary synthesis.


Preliminary Efficacy Of A Computer-Delivered Hiv Prevention Intervention For African American Teenage Females, Charles H. Klein, Josefina J. Card Jan 2011

Preliminary Efficacy Of A Computer-Delivered Hiv Prevention Intervention For African American Teenage Females, Charles H. Klein, Josefina J. Card

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

This study translated SiHLE (Sisters Informing, Healing, Living, and Empowering), a 12-hour Centers for Disease Control and Prevention evidence based group-level intervention for African American females 14-18 years of age, into a 2-hour computer-delivered individual-level intervention. A randomized controlled trial (n = 178) was conducted to examine the efficacy of the new Multimedia SiHLE intervention. Average condom-protected sex acts (proportion of vaginal sex acts with condoms, last 90 days) for sexually active participants receiving Multimedia SiHLE rose from M = 51% at baseline to M = 71% at 3-month follow-up (t = 2.06, p = .05); no statistically significant difference was found in the ...


Tourism, Persistence, And Change: Sherpa Spirituality And Place In Sagarmatha (Mount Everest) National Park And Buffer Zone, Nepal, Jeremy Spoon Jan 2011

Tourism, Persistence, And Change: Sherpa Spirituality And Place In Sagarmatha (Mount Everest) National Park And Buffer Zone, Nepal, Jeremy Spoon

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Ecotourism and cultural tourism are emerging as vehicles for many of the world’s indigenous peoples to integrate into the global market economy. The ecological knowledge and understanding of these societies may in turn be affected by these nascent industries. As part of shifting human-environment relationships, tourism can influence place-based spirituality. In this manuscript, I describe research on how tourism affected Khumbu Sherpa place-based spiritual values in Sagarmatha (Mt. Everest) National Park and Buffer Zone, Nepal. As Tibetan Buddhists, the Sherpa embodied dual overlapping conceptions of sacred landscape that connected people to place in some environmentally sustainable ways. Since the ...


Comments On "Identification, Classification, & Zooarchaeology", Virginia L. Butler Jan 2011

Comments On "Identification, Classification, & Zooarchaeology", Virginia L. Butler

Anthropology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Comments on the article "Identification, Classification and Zooarchaeology" by Jonathan C. Driver.