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Organic Chemistry Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Organic Chemistry

Ferrocene Constrained Helical Peptides Via On-Resin Cyclization, Thomas A. Mcteague Apr 2012

Ferrocene Constrained Helical Peptides Via On-Resin Cyclization, Thomas A. Mcteague

Senior Theses and Projects

Previous research within the Curran group has demonstrated that ferrocene may be used as an organometallic constraint to induce the formation of α-helices in short peptides which traditionally possess undefined conformations. Through strategic placement of lysine residues at the i and i+3 positions within the peptide, such a constraint was accomplished via the crosslinking of the lysine side chains to ferrocene dicarboxylic acid chloride in solution phase synthesis. The aim of this work was to develop a method for solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) for the synthesis of these ferrocene-constrained helices. In particular, we seek to develop a method ...


Coupling Coherence Distinguishes Structure Sensitivity In Protein Electron Transfer, Tatiana Prytkova, Igor V. Kurnikov, David Beratan Jan 2007

Coupling Coherence Distinguishes Structure Sensitivity In Protein Electron Transfer, Tatiana Prytkova, Igor V. Kurnikov, David Beratan

Biology, Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences Faculty Articles and Research

Quantum mechanical analysis of electron tunneling in nine thermally fluctuating cytochrome b562 derivatives reveals two distinct protein-mediated coupling limits. A structure-insensitive regime arises for redox partners coupled through dynamically averaged multiple-coupling pathways (in seven of the nine derivatives) where heme-edge coupling leads to the multiple-pathway regime. A structure-dependent limit governs redox partners coupled through a dominant pathway (in two of the nine derivatives) where axial-ligand coupling generates the single-pathway limit and slower rates. This two-regime paradigm provides a unified description of electron transfer rates in 26 ruthenium-modified heme and blue-copper proteins, as well as in numerous photosynthetic proteins.