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Full-Text Articles in Medicinal-Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Dengue Virus Ns2b/Ns3 Protease Inhibitors Exploiting The Prime Side, Kuan-Hung Lin, Akbar Ali, Linah Rusere, Djade I. Soumana, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer Jul 2017

Dengue Virus Ns2b/Ns3 Protease Inhibitors Exploiting The Prime Side, Kuan-Hung Lin, Akbar Ali, Linah Rusere, Djade I. Soumana, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer

Celia A. Schiffer

The mosquito-transmitted dengue virus (DENV) infects millions of people in tropical and subtropical regions. Maturation of DENV particles requires proper cleavage of the viral polyprotein, including processing of 8 of the 13 substrate cleavage sites by dengue virus NS2B/NS3 protease. With no available direct-acting antiviral targeting DENV, NS2/NS3 protease is a promising target for inhibitor design. Current design efforts focus on the nonprime side of the DENV protease active site, resulting in highly hydrophilic and nonspecific scaffolds. However, the prime side also significantly modulates DENV protease binding affinity, as revealed by engineering the binding loop of aprotinin, a ...


Interdependence Of Inhibitor Recognition In Hiv-1 Protease, Janet L. Paulsen, Florian Leidner, Debra A. Ragland, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer Jun 2017

Interdependence Of Inhibitor Recognition In Hiv-1 Protease, Janet L. Paulsen, Florian Leidner, Debra A. Ragland, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer

Celia A. Schiffer

Molecular recognition is a highly interdependent process. Subsite couplings within the active site of proteases are most often revealed through conditional amino acid preferences in substrate recognition. However, the potential effect of these couplings on inhibition and thus inhibitor design is largely unexplored. The present study examines the interdependency of subsites in HIV-1 protease using a focused library of protease inhibitors, to aid in future inhibitor design. Previously a series of darunavir (DRV) analogs was designed to systematically probe the S1' and S2' subsites. Co-crystal structures of these analogs with HIV-1 protease provide the ideal opportunity to probe subsite interdependency ...


Interdependence Of Inhibitor Recognition In Hiv-1 Protease, Janet L. Paulsen, Florian Leidner, Debra A. Ragland, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer May 2017

Interdependence Of Inhibitor Recognition In Hiv-1 Protease, Janet L. Paulsen, Florian Leidner, Debra A. Ragland, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer

University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

Molecular recognition is a highly interdependent process. Subsite couplings within the active site of proteases are most often revealed through conditional amino acid preferences in substrate recognition. However, the potential effect of these couplings on inhibition and thus inhibitor design is largely unexplored. The present study examines the interdependency of subsites in HIV-1 protease using a focused library of protease inhibitors, to aid in future inhibitor design. Previously a series of darunavir (DRV) analogs was designed to systematically probe the S1' and S2' subsites. Co-crystal structures of these analogs with HIV-1 protease provide the ideal opportunity to probe subsite interdependency ...


Dengue Virus Ns2b/Ns3 Protease Inhibitors Exploiting The Prime Side, Kuan-Hung Lin, Akbar Ali, Linah Rusere, Djade I. Soumana, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer Apr 2017

Dengue Virus Ns2b/Ns3 Protease Inhibitors Exploiting The Prime Side, Kuan-Hung Lin, Akbar Ali, Linah Rusere, Djade I. Soumana, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer

University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

The mosquito-transmitted dengue virus (DENV) infects millions of people in tropical and subtropical regions. Maturation of DENV particles requires proper cleavage of the viral polyprotein, including processing of 8 of the 13 substrate cleavage sites by dengue virus NS2B/NS3 protease. With no available direct-acting antiviral targeting DENV, NS2/NS3 protease is a promising target for inhibitor design. Current design efforts focus on the nonprime side of the DENV protease active site, resulting in highly hydrophilic and nonspecific scaffolds. However, the prime side also significantly modulates DENV protease binding affinity, as revealed by engineering the binding loop of aprotinin, a ...


Leukeran, Leslie R. Hunt Jan 2014

Leukeran, Leslie R. Hunt

Natural Sciences Poster Sessions

Leukeran (generic name Chlorambucil) is used alone or with other antineoplastics to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, malignant lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, giant follicular lymphoma, and cancers of the ovaries, breast, and testes. Unlabled uses include treatment of nonneoplastic conditions such as vasculitis complicating rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hemolytic anemias associated with cold agglutinins, lupus glomerulonephritis, idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, polycythenmia vera, and macroglobulinemia.


Reversed Chloroquine Molecules As A Strategy To Overcome Resistance In Malaria, David H. Peyton Mar 2012

Reversed Chloroquine Molecules As A Strategy To Overcome Resistance In Malaria, David H. Peyton

Chemistry Faculty Publications and Presentations

This short review tells the story of how Reversed Chloroquine drugs (RCQs) were developed. These are hybrid molecules, made by combining the quinoline nucleus from chloroquine (CQ) with moieties which are designed to inhibit efflux via known transporters in the membrane of the digestive vacuole of the malaria parasite. The resulting RCQ drugs can have potencies exceeding that of CQ, while at the same time having physical chemical characteristics that may make them favorable as partner drugs in combination therapies. The need for such novel antimalarial drugs will continue for the foreseeable future.


Structure-Based Design Of Inhibitors Targeting Influenza A Virus M2 Proton Channel (A/M2), Jun Wang Dec 2010

Structure-Based Design Of Inhibitors Targeting Influenza A Virus M2 Proton Channel (A/M2), Jun Wang

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

Influenza A virus M2 (A/M2) forms a homotetrameric channel in viral membranes that is highly selective for protons. A/M2 has been extensively studied by electrophysiologists, biophysicists, structural biologists and biochemists in order to understand the mechanism and selectivity of proton conductance from the structural basis. Medicinal chemists have also studied A/M2 as therapeutic target for anti-flu drugs. However, research on A/M2 drug binding lead to entirely different binding sites of two very similar anti-flu drugs. In light of the urgency in developing novel antivirals against drug resistant A/M2 mutants, it is imperative to solve this ...


Combining Structure-Based Drug Design And Pharmacophores, Renate Griffith, T. T. T. Luu, James A. Garner, Paul A. Keller Aug 2010

Combining Structure-Based Drug Design And Pharmacophores, Renate Griffith, T. T. T. Luu, James A. Garner, Paul A. Keller

Paul Keller

Development towards integrated computer-aided drug design methodologies is presented by utilising crystal structure complexes to produce structure-based pharmacophores. These novel pharmacophores represent the ligand features that are involved in interactions with the target protein, as well as the space around the ligand occupied by the protein. The protein-ligand complexes can also yield information about all interactions that ligands could potentially form with the binding site, as well as about the size of the binding cavity. Together, these describe a 'superligand', which can also be viewed as a pharmacophore. Various types of novel pharmacophores are discussed and compared, using HIV-1 Reverse ...


Combining Structure-Based Drug Design And Pharmacophores, Renate Griffith, T. T. T. Luu, James A. Garner, Paul A. Keller Jan 2005

Combining Structure-Based Drug Design And Pharmacophores, Renate Griffith, T. T. T. Luu, James A. Garner, Paul A. Keller

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Development towards integrated computer-aided drug design methodologies is presented by utilising crystal structure complexes to produce structure-based pharmacophores. These novel pharmacophores represent the ligand features that are involved in interactions with the target protein, as well as the space around the ligand occupied by the protein. The protein-ligand complexes can also yield information about all interactions that ligands could potentially form with the binding site, as well as about the size of the binding cavity. Together, these describe a 'superligand', which can also be viewed as a pharmacophore. Various types of novel pharmacophores are discussed and compared, using HIV-1 Reverse ...