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Full-Text Articles in Medicinal-Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Development Of Novel Alkaloid Derivatives For The Treatment Of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Lindsay Michelle Renn Oct 2017

Development Of Novel Alkaloid Derivatives For The Treatment Of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Lindsay Michelle Renn

Theses and Dissertations

The majority of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients can be treated with and respond to imatinib mesylate (Gleevec). Imatinib is known to inhibit BCR-ABLl kinase activity, and is effective for the treatment of the majority of CML patients. Multiple mutations have been found in patients resistant to imatinib treatment, including many located in the BCR-ABLl tyrosine kinase domain (e.g. E255K and T315I). Matrine is a bioactive alkaloid from Sophora flavescens and has been shown to inhibit several types of cancers and is used in Chinese medicine. The goal of this study is to develop new matrine derivatives that inhibit ...


Interdependence Of Inhibitor Recognition In Hiv-1 Protease, Janet L. Paulsen, Florian Leidner, Debra A. Ragland, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer Jun 2017

Interdependence Of Inhibitor Recognition In Hiv-1 Protease, Janet L. Paulsen, Florian Leidner, Debra A. Ragland, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer

Celia A. Schiffer

Molecular recognition is a highly interdependent process. Subsite couplings within the active site of proteases are most often revealed through conditional amino acid preferences in substrate recognition. However, the potential effect of these couplings on inhibition and thus inhibitor design is largely unexplored. The present study examines the interdependency of subsites in HIV-1 protease using a focused library of protease inhibitors, to aid in future inhibitor design. Previously a series of darunavir (DRV) analogs was designed to systematically probe the S1' and S2' subsites. Co-crystal structures of these analogs with HIV-1 protease provide the ideal opportunity to probe subsite interdependency ...


Interdependence Of Inhibitor Recognition In Hiv-1 Protease, Janet L. Paulsen, Florian Leidner, Debra A. Ragland, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer May 2017

Interdependence Of Inhibitor Recognition In Hiv-1 Protease, Janet L. Paulsen, Florian Leidner, Debra A. Ragland, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer

University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

Molecular recognition is a highly interdependent process. Subsite couplings within the active site of proteases are most often revealed through conditional amino acid preferences in substrate recognition. However, the potential effect of these couplings on inhibition and thus inhibitor design is largely unexplored. The present study examines the interdependency of subsites in HIV-1 protease using a focused library of protease inhibitors, to aid in future inhibitor design. Previously a series of darunavir (DRV) analogs was designed to systematically probe the S1' and S2' subsites. Co-crystal structures of these analogs with HIV-1 protease provide the ideal opportunity to probe subsite interdependency ...