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Full-Text Articles in Medicinal-Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Dengue Virus Ns2b/Ns3 Protease Inhibitors Exploiting The Prime Side, Kuan-Hung Lin, Akbar Ali, Linah Rusere, Djade I. Soumana, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer Jul 2017

Dengue Virus Ns2b/Ns3 Protease Inhibitors Exploiting The Prime Side, Kuan-Hung Lin, Akbar Ali, Linah Rusere, Djade I. Soumana, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer

Celia A. Schiffer

The mosquito-transmitted dengue virus (DENV) infects millions of people in tropical and subtropical regions. Maturation of DENV particles requires proper cleavage of the viral polyprotein, including processing of 8 of the 13 substrate cleavage sites by dengue virus NS2B/NS3 protease. With no available direct-acting antiviral targeting DENV, NS2/NS3 protease is a promising target for inhibitor design. Current design efforts focus on the nonprime side of the DENV protease active site, resulting in highly hydrophilic and nonspecific scaffolds. However, the prime side also significantly modulates DENV protease binding affinity, as revealed by engineering the binding loop of aprotinin, a ...


Interdependence Of Inhibitor Recognition In Hiv-1 Protease, Janet L. Paulsen, Florian Leidner, Debra A. Ragland, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer Jun 2017

Interdependence Of Inhibitor Recognition In Hiv-1 Protease, Janet L. Paulsen, Florian Leidner, Debra A. Ragland, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer

Celia A. Schiffer

Molecular recognition is a highly interdependent process. Subsite couplings within the active site of proteases are most often revealed through conditional amino acid preferences in substrate recognition. However, the potential effect of these couplings on inhibition and thus inhibitor design is largely unexplored. The present study examines the interdependency of subsites in HIV-1 protease using a focused library of protease inhibitors, to aid in future inhibitor design. Previously a series of darunavir (DRV) analogs was designed to systematically probe the S1' and S2' subsites. Co-crystal structures of these analogs with HIV-1 protease provide the ideal opportunity to probe subsite interdependency ...


Diverse Stimuli Engage Different Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Pathways, Elaine F. Kenny, Alf Herzig, Renate Krüger, Aaron Muth, Santanu Mondal, Paul R. Thompson, Volker Brinkmann, Horst Von Bernuth, Arturo Zychlinsky Jun 2017

Diverse Stimuli Engage Different Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Pathways, Elaine F. Kenny, Alf Herzig, Renate Krüger, Aaron Muth, Santanu Mondal, Paul R. Thompson, Volker Brinkmann, Horst Von Bernuth, Arturo Zychlinsky

Thompson Lab Publications

Neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) which ensnare pathogens and have pathogenic functions in diverse diseases. We examined the NETosis pathways induced by five stimuli; PMA, the calcium ionophore A23187, nigericin, Candida albicans and Group B Streptococcus. We studied NET production in neutrophils from healthy donors with inhibitors of molecules crucial to PMA induced NETs including protein kinase C, calcium, reactive oxygen species, the enzymes myeloperoxidase (MPO) and neutrophil elastase. Additionally, neutrophils from chronic granulomatous disease patients, carrying mutations in the NADPH oxidase complex or a MPO-deficient patient were examined. We show that PMA, C. albicans and GBS use a ...


Role Of Peptidylarginine Deiminase 2 (Pad2) In Mammary Carcinoma Cell Migration, Sachi Horibata, Katherine E. Rogers, David Sadegh, Lynne J. Anguish, John L. Mcelwee, Pragya Shah, Paul R. Thompson, Scott A. Coonrod May 2017

Role Of Peptidylarginine Deiminase 2 (Pad2) In Mammary Carcinoma Cell Migration, Sachi Horibata, Katherine E. Rogers, David Sadegh, Lynne J. Anguish, John L. Mcelwee, Pragya Shah, Paul R. Thompson, Scott A. Coonrod

Thompson Lab Publications

BACKGROUND: Penetration of the mammary gland basement membrane by cancer cells is a crucial first step in tumor invasion. Using a mouse model of ductal carcinoma in situ, we previously found that inhibition of peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2, aka PADI2) activity appears to maintain basement membrane integrity in xenograft tumors. The goal of this investigation was to gain insight into the mechanisms by which PAD2 mediates this process.

METHODS: For our study, we modulated PAD2 activity in mammary ductal carcinoma cells by lentiviral shRNA-mediated depletion, lentiviral-mediated PAD2 overexpression, or PAD inhibition and explored the effects of these treatments on changes ...


Interdependence Of Inhibitor Recognition In Hiv-1 Protease, Janet L. Paulsen, Florian Leidner, Debra A. Ragland, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer May 2017

Interdependence Of Inhibitor Recognition In Hiv-1 Protease, Janet L. Paulsen, Florian Leidner, Debra A. Ragland, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer

University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

Molecular recognition is a highly interdependent process. Subsite couplings within the active site of proteases are most often revealed through conditional amino acid preferences in substrate recognition. However, the potential effect of these couplings on inhibition and thus inhibitor design is largely unexplored. The present study examines the interdependency of subsites in HIV-1 protease using a focused library of protease inhibitors, to aid in future inhibitor design. Previously a series of darunavir (DRV) analogs was designed to systematically probe the S1' and S2' subsites. Co-crystal structures of these analogs with HIV-1 protease provide the ideal opportunity to probe subsite interdependency ...


Dengue Virus Ns2b/Ns3 Protease Inhibitors Exploiting The Prime Side, Kuan-Hung Lin, Akbar Ali, Linah Rusere, Djade I. Soumana, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer Apr 2017

Dengue Virus Ns2b/Ns3 Protease Inhibitors Exploiting The Prime Side, Kuan-Hung Lin, Akbar Ali, Linah Rusere, Djade I. Soumana, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer

University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

The mosquito-transmitted dengue virus (DENV) infects millions of people in tropical and subtropical regions. Maturation of DENV particles requires proper cleavage of the viral polyprotein, including processing of 8 of the 13 substrate cleavage sites by dengue virus NS2B/NS3 protease. With no available direct-acting antiviral targeting DENV, NS2/NS3 protease is a promising target for inhibitor design. Current design efforts focus on the nonprime side of the DENV protease active site, resulting in highly hydrophilic and nonspecific scaffolds. However, the prime side also significantly modulates DENV protease binding affinity, as revealed by engineering the binding loop of aprotinin, a ...


Design, Synthesis, And Biological Activity Of 1,2,3-Triazolobenzodiazepine Bet Bromodomain Inhibitors [Accepted Manuscript], Phillip P. Sharp, Jean-Marc Garnier, Tamas Hatfaludi, Zhen Xu, David Segal, Kate E. Jarman, Hélène Jousset, Alexandra Garnham, John T. Feutrill, Anthony Cuzzupe, Peter Hall, Scott Taylor, Carl Walkley, Dean Tyler, Mark A. Dawson, Peter Czabotar, Andrew F. Wilks, Stefan Glaser, David C. S. Huang, Christopher J. Burns Jan 2017

Design, Synthesis, And Biological Activity Of 1,2,3-Triazolobenzodiazepine Bet Bromodomain Inhibitors [Accepted Manuscript], Phillip P. Sharp, Jean-Marc Garnier, Tamas Hatfaludi, Zhen Xu, David Segal, Kate E. Jarman, Hélène Jousset, Alexandra Garnham, John T. Feutrill, Anthony Cuzzupe, Peter Hall, Scott Taylor, Carl Walkley, Dean Tyler, Mark A. Dawson, Peter Czabotar, Andrew F. Wilks, Stefan Glaser, David C. S. Huang, Christopher J. Burns

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

A number of diazepines are known to inhibit bromo- and extra-terminal domain (BET) proteins. Their BET inhibitory activity derives from the fusion of an acetyl-lysine mimetic heterocycle onto the diazepine framework. Herein we describe a straightforward, modular synthesis of novel 1,2,3-triazolobenzodiazepines and show that the 1,2,3-triazole acts as an effective acetyl-lysine mimetic heterocycle. Structure-based optimization of this series of compounds led to the development of potent BET bromodomain inhibitors with excellent activity against leukemic cells, concomitant with a reduction in c-MYC expression. These novel benzodiazepines therefore represent a promising class of therapeutic BET inhibitors.