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Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmaceutics

APOBEC3G

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Full-Text Articles in Medicinal-Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Mechanism For Apobec3g Catalytic Exclusion Of Rna And Non-Substrate Dna, William C. Solomon, Wazo Myint, Shurong Hou, Tapan Kanai, Rashmi Tripathi, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer, Hiroshi Matsuo Aug 2019

Mechanism For Apobec3g Catalytic Exclusion Of Rna And Non-Substrate Dna, William C. Solomon, Wazo Myint, Shurong Hou, Tapan Kanai, Rashmi Tripathi, Nese Kurt Yilmaz, Celia A. Schiffer, Hiroshi Matsuo

Schiffer Lab Publications

The potent antiretroviral protein APOBEC3G (A3G) specifically targets and deaminates deoxycytidine nucleotides, generating deoxyuridine, in single stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediates produced during HIV replication. A non-catalytic domain in A3G binds strongly to RNA, an interaction crucial for recruitment of A3G to the virion; yet, A3G displays no deamination activity for cytidines in viral RNA. Here, we report NMR and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analysis for interactions between A3Gctd and multiple substrate or non-substrate DNA and RNA, in combination with deamination assays. NMR ssDNA-binding experiments revealed that the interaction with residues in helix1 and loop1 (T201-L220) distinguishes the binding mode of ...


Inhibition Of Apobec3g Activity Impedes Double-Stranded Dna Repair, Ponnandy Prabhu, Shivender Shandilya, Elena Britan-Rosich, Adi Nagler, Celia Schiffer, Moshe Kotler Jan 2016

Inhibition Of Apobec3g Activity Impedes Double-Stranded Dna Repair, Ponnandy Prabhu, Shivender Shandilya, Elena Britan-Rosich, Adi Nagler, Celia Schiffer, Moshe Kotler

Celia A. Schiffer

The cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) was first described as an anti-HIV-1 restriction factor, acting by directly deaminating reverse transcripts of the viral genome. HIV-1 Vif neutralizes the activity of A3G, primarily by mediating degradation of A3G to establish effective infection in host target cells. Lymphoma cells, which express high amounts of A3G, can restrict Vif-deficient HIV-1. Interestingly, these cells are more stable in the face of treatments that result in double-stranded DNA damage, such as ionizing radiation and chemotherapies. Previously, we showed that the Vif-derived peptide (Vif25-39) efficiently inhibits A3G deamination, and increases the sensitivity of lymphoma cells to ...