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Cell Biology Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2014

Blotting, Northern

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Cell Biology

Developmental Expression Of A Candidate Mullerian Inhibiting Substance Type Ii Receptor, Jose Teixeira, Wei He, Paresh Shah, Nobuyuki Morikawa, Mary Lee, Elizabeth Catlin, Peter Hudson, John Wing, David Maclaughlin, Patricia Donahoe Sep 2014

Developmental Expression Of A Candidate Mullerian Inhibiting Substance Type Ii Receptor, Jose Teixeira, Wei He, Paresh Shah, Nobuyuki Morikawa, Mary Lee, Elizabeth Catlin, Peter Hudson, John Wing, David Maclaughlin, Patricia Donahoe

Mary M. Lee

We have isolated a candidate Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) type II receptor complementary DNA from an embryonic rat urogenital ridge library and have studied its binding to MIS, its developmental pattern of expression and tissue distribution. By in situ hybridization with a full-length riboprobe, the receptor is expressed in the mesenchymal cells surrounding the Mullerian duct at embryonic days 14, 15, and 16 and in tubular and follicular structures of the rat fetal gonads. Expression of the messenger RNA was also seen in the granules cells and seminiferous tubules of pubertal gonads. Northern analysis revealed that the MIS type II ...


Mullerian Inhibiting Substance As A Marker For Ovarian Sex-Cord Tumor, Michael Gustafson, Mary Lee, Robert Scully, Ashby Moncure, Toshio Hirakawa, Annekathryn Goodman, Howard Muntz, Patricia Donahoe, David Maclaughlin, Arlan Fuller Sep 2014

Mullerian Inhibiting Substance As A Marker For Ovarian Sex-Cord Tumor, Michael Gustafson, Mary Lee, Robert Scully, Ashby Moncure, Toshio Hirakawa, Annekathryn Goodman, Howard Muntz, Patricia Donahoe, David Maclaughlin, Arlan Fuller

Mary M. Lee

No abstract provided.


Mullerian Inhibiting Substance Is Present In Embryonic Testes Of Dogs With Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome, Vicki Meyers-Wallen, Mary Lee, T. Manganaro, T. Kuroda, David Maclaughlin, Patricia Donahoe Sep 2014

Mullerian Inhibiting Substance Is Present In Embryonic Testes Of Dogs With Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome, Vicki Meyers-Wallen, Mary Lee, T. Manganaro, T. Kuroda, David Maclaughlin, Patricia Donahoe

Mary M. Lee

Mullerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS) causes regression of the Mullerian ducts during a critical period in embryonic development in male mammals. In Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome (PMDS), an autosomal recessive trait in humans and dogs, the Mullerian ducts fail to regress in otherwise normal males. Previously we reported that PMDS-affected dogs produce bioactive testicular MIS postnatally. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether PMDS-affected canine embryos appropriately express MIS mRNA and protein during the critical period for Mullerian duct regression. Homozygous (PMDS-affected) and normal canine embryos were removed from timed pregnancies. Gonadal sex and the degree of Mullerian ...


Androgen Profiles During Pubertal Leydig Cell Development In Mice, Xiufeng Wu, Ramamani Arumugam, Ningning Zhang, Mary Lee Sep 2014

Androgen Profiles During Pubertal Leydig Cell Development In Mice, Xiufeng Wu, Ramamani Arumugam, Ningning Zhang, Mary Lee

Mary M. Lee

Postnatal Leydig cell (LC) development in mice has been assumed empirically to resemble that of rats, which have characteristic hormonal profiles at well-defined maturational stages. To characterize the changes in LC function and gene expression in mice, we examined reproductive hormone expression from birth to 180 days, and quantified in vivo and in vitro production of androgens during sexual maturation. Although the overall plasma androgen and LH profiles from birth through puberty were comparable to that of rats, the timing of developmental changes in androgen production and steroidogenic capacity of isolated LCs differed. In mice, onset of androgen biosynthetic capacity ...


Developmental Changes In Mullerian Inhibiting Substance In The Cynomolgus Monkey, Macaca Fascicularis, Mary Lee, M. Gustafson, Etsuji Ukiyama, Patricia Donahoe, David Maclaughlin, Michael Wexler, Hugh Keeping Sep 2014

Developmental Changes In Mullerian Inhibiting Substance In The Cynomolgus Monkey, Macaca Fascicularis, Mary Lee, M. Gustafson, Etsuji Ukiyama, Patricia Donahoe, David Maclaughlin, Michael Wexler, Hugh Keeping

Mary M. Lee

Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) is a glycoprotein hormone produced in Sertoli cells of the fetal and postnatal testis, and granulosa cells of the pubertal ovary. We examined MIS expression in a nonhuman primate, the cynomolgus macaque monkey (Macaca fascicularis), to define an animal model for studying MIS gene regulation. Changes in testicular MIS mRNA with age were assessed by in situ hybridization of prepubertal to adult testes, Northern analysis of pubertal and adult specimens, and determination of serum MIS concentrations from infancy to adulthood. We found that MIS expression was highest in the youngest animals and decreased progressively with increasing ...


Mullerian Inhibiting Substance Messenger Ribonucleic Acid Expression In Granulosa And Sertoli Cells Coincides With Their Mitotic Activity, Seiichi Hirobe, Wei He, Mary Lee, Patricia Donahoe Sep 2014

Mullerian Inhibiting Substance Messenger Ribonucleic Acid Expression In Granulosa And Sertoli Cells Coincides With Their Mitotic Activity, Seiichi Hirobe, Wei He, Mary Lee, Patricia Donahoe

Mary M. Lee

In males, Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) mRNA was first detected on the medial aspect of the urogenital ridge early on the morning of day 13 of gestation before testicular differentiation was evident, and localized to the more obvious Sertoli cells later on embryonic day 13. MIS transcripts remained at maximal levels between 14.5 and 17.5 days gestation, while the Mullerian duct involutes, and remained high until birth. MIS gene expression decreased progressively after birth and, as germ cell meiosis increased, became barely detectable in the Sertoli cells of the seminiferous tubules. In female rats, MIS mRNA was first ...