Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Cell Biology Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Cell Biology

A Forward Genetics Approach To Identify Molecular Drivers Of Liver Cancer Using Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models, Jesse Daniel Riordan Dec 2013

A Forward Genetics Approach To Identify Molecular Drivers Of Liver Cancer Using Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models, Jesse Daniel Riordan

Theses and Dissertations

Each year liver cancer kills more than half a million people, making it the third

leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Annual incidence continues to rise steadily, both domestically and globally, increasing the burden of this disease. Advancements in the ability to obtain detailed molecular profiles of tumors have led to the successful development of targeted therapies for a number of different cancers. Unfortunately, however, the molecular pathogenesis of liver cancer is poorly understood relative to many other types of malignancies. Thus, the identification of factors contributing to the development and progression of liver tumors is a major goal of ...


The Molecular Mechanisms Of Pitx2 In Tooth Development And Enamel Defects In Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome, Xiao Li Dec 2013

The Molecular Mechanisms Of Pitx2 In Tooth Development And Enamel Defects In Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome, Xiao Li

Theses and Dissertations

Patients with Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome (ARS) present various dental abnormalities. ARS is genetically associated with mutations in the PITX2 gene, which encodes one of the earliest transcription factors to initiate tooth development. Thus, Pitx2 has long been considered as an upstream regulator of the transcriptional hierarchy in tooth development. However, it is unclear how its mutant forms cause ARS dental anomalies. In this report, we outline the transcriptional mechanism that is defective in ARS. We demonstrate that during normal tooth development Pitx2 activates Amelogenin (Amel) expression, whose product is required for enamel formation, and that this regulation is perturbed by missense ...


Endothelial Agonists Stimulate Vwf Release In Vitro And Trigger Ttp In Vivo, Gilbert Van Schaeffer Dec 2013

Endothelial Agonists Stimulate Vwf Release In Vitro And Trigger Ttp In Vivo, Gilbert Van Schaeffer

Theses and Dissertations

Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a plasma glycoprotein that can bind collagen at a wound site as well as circulating platelets. VWF forms high molecular weight multimers (>20,000 kDa). VWF can also form VWF strings that appear to be attached to the endothelial surface and are capable of binding platelets. These strings are only observed in vitro and in vivo in the absence of the VWF-cleaving protease ADAMTS13. Deficiency in ADAMTS13 results in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), a clotting disorder characterized by thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, renal dysfunction, neurological dysfunction and fever. Patients suffering from TTP demonstrate VWF-and platelet-rich ...


Aspects Of The Innate Immune System In The Caribbean Octocoral Swiftia Exserta, Lorenzo P. Menzel Nov 2013

Aspects Of The Innate Immune System In The Caribbean Octocoral Swiftia Exserta, Lorenzo P. Menzel

FIU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The immune systems of cnidaria are important to study for two reasons: to gain a better understanding of the evolution of immune responses, and to provide a basis to partially redress the precipitous world-wide die-offs of reef corals, some of which have been attributed to diseases and stress. Many immune responses share ancient evolutionary origins and are common across many taxa.

Using Swiftia exserta, an azooxanthellate ahermatypic local octocoral, as a proxy model organism to study aspects of innate immunity in corals and cnidaria allows us to address both of the reasons listed above while not using endangered species. Utilizing ...


Flash4 Dark Reference Images, George Mcnamara Apr 2013

Flash4 Dark Reference Images, George Mcnamara

George McNamara

Hamamatsu FLASH4.0 dark reference images, acquired with 10 second exposure times, no light to camera. Camera offset (set by Hamamatsu( is ~100 (the average intensity of the first image is always ~1 intensity level higher - an odd feature, but trivial in practice for a 16-bit camera).

George McNamara, Ph.D.

Single Cells Analyst at L.J.N. Cooper Lab

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center


Video Codec Performance (Excel Spreadsheet), George Mcnamara Feb 2013

Video Codec Performance (Excel Spreadsheet), George Mcnamara

George McNamara

Video codec performance (Excel spreadsheet). Movie was made in 2005-2006 when I worked at City of Hope National Medical Center. VTLF refers to Video Timelapse Light Facility. Videos were outputted from MetaMorph as AVI files. Personally, I always recommend uncompressed video files fro scientific uses. I also encourage posting the original scientific data format (ex. .lsm, .zvi, .lif, .stk).


Pubspectra Tattletales, George Mcnamara Feb 2013

Pubspectra Tattletales, George Mcnamara

George McNamara

Tattletales for Multiplex Fluorescent Reporters in Single Cells for Metabolomics

George McNamara

As of April 2013: L.J.N. Cooper & D.A. Lee Cellular Immunotherapy Lab, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Email: gtmcnamara@mdanderson.org, geomcnamara@earthlink.net

Tattletales is my concept for spatial multiplexing many fluorescent protein (FP) biosensors in the same live cell. For example, there are excellent FP biosensors to Ca++ ions, pH, glucose, ribose, glutamine, glutamate, ATP, redox, ROS, pyruvate, cAMP, cGMP, IP3, PI(3,4,5)P3, cell cycle indicators (Fucci2), PKA, PKC, photsphatases, caspase(s) [1, 2]. However, these are typically used one biosensor per experiment, due in part to flooding the cell with soluble biosensor. That is, conventionally, either a metabolite (glucose) reporter or a signal transduction (Ca++) reporter can be imaged. By flooding the cell with the reporter, signal to noise ratio is compromized by autofluorescence.

Tattletales takes advantage of spatial multiplexing to both increase the number of different reporters, and improve signal to noise ratio by localizing each biosensor to a small volume. I started with the observation by Robinett et al [3] who localized 512 GFP-nls-LacI to a 256 LacO array as a 200 nm diameter diffraction limited spot (nuclear background due to overexpression). Many thousands of DNA binding proteins, of known sequence specifities, exist (LacI, TetR, GalR, etc for cell line studies; ZF-FPs, TALE-FPs to STRs, telomere repeat binding factors-FPs, etc for primary cells) and can be fused (as cDNAs) to different fluorescent proteins and FP biosensors.

Many biosensors are available as affinity series [1, 4], now enabling extended dynamic range. I realized that spatial multiplexing of many DNA binding protein-reporters by localizing to different spots in the cell nucleus and distinguished by combinatorial addressing, where N address colors provide 2^N addresses (example, 3 colors is 2^3 = 8 combinations). Multiplexing ...


Evaluation Of Antibiotic Resistance Emerging From Use Of Antibiotics In Cafos, J. R. Robbins, D. Hellman, N. Pease, M. Costello Jan 2013

Evaluation Of Antibiotic Resistance Emerging From Use Of Antibiotics In Cafos, J. R. Robbins, D. Hellman, N. Pease, M. Costello

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Abnormal Trafficking Of Endogenously Expressed Bmpr2 Mutant Allelic Products In Patients With Heritable Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, Andrea L Frump, Jonathan W. Lowery Ph.D., Rizwan Hamid, Eric D Austin, Mark De Caestecker Jan 2013

Abnormal Trafficking Of Endogenously Expressed Bmpr2 Mutant Allelic Products In Patients With Heritable Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, Andrea L Frump, Jonathan W. Lowery Ph.D., Rizwan Hamid, Eric D Austin, Mark De Caestecker

Faculty Publications and Research

More than 200 heterozygous mutations in the type 2 BMP receptor gene, BMPR2, have been identified in patients with Heritable Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (HPAH). More severe clinical outcomes occur in patients with BMPR2 mutations by-passing nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD negative mutations). These comprise 40% of HPAH mutations and are predicted to express BMPR2 mutant products. However expression of endogenous NMD negative BMPR2 mutant products and their effect on protein trafficking and signaling function have never been described. Here, we characterize the expression and trafficking of an HPAH-associated NMD negative BMPR2 mutation that results in an in-frame deletion of BMPR2 EXON2 ...