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Full-Text Articles in Cell Biology

In Vivo Mature Immunological Synapses Forming Smacs Mediate Clearance Of Virally Infected Astrocytes From The Brain, Carlos Barcia, Clare Thomas, James Curtin, Gwendalyn King, Kolja Wawrowsky, Marianela Candolfi, Weidong Xiong, Chunyan Liu, Kurt Kroeger, Olivier Boyer, Jerzy Kupiec-Weglinski, David Klatzmann, Maria Castro, Pedro Lowenstein Sep 2006

In Vivo Mature Immunological Synapses Forming Smacs Mediate Clearance Of Virally Infected Astrocytes From The Brain, Carlos Barcia, Clare Thomas, James Curtin, Gwendalyn King, Kolja Wawrowsky, Marianela Candolfi, Weidong Xiong, Chunyan Liu, Kurt Kroeger, Olivier Boyer, Jerzy Kupiec-Weglinski, David Klatzmann, Maria Castro, Pedro Lowenstein

Articles

The microanatomy of immune clearance of infected brain cells remains poorly understood. Immunological synapses are essential anatomical structures that channel information exchanges between T cell–antigen-presenting cells (APC) during the priming and effector phases of T cells' function, and during natural killer–target cell interactions. The hallmark of immunological synapses established by T cells is the formation of the supramolecular activation clusters (SMACs), in which adhesion molecules such as leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 segregate to the peripheral domain of the immunological synapse (p-SMAC), which surrounds the T cell receptor–rich or central SMAC (c-SMAC). The inability so far to detect ...


Understanding Il-12 Responsiveness During Leishmania Amazonensis Infection , Amanda Ellen Ramer Jan 2006

Understanding Il-12 Responsiveness During Leishmania Amazonensis Infection , Amanda Ellen Ramer

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease caused by intracellular protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. C3H mice challenged with L. major develop a polarized Th1 response and subsequently heal, whereas L. amazonensis challenge leads to chronic lesions with high parasite loads. This work demonstrates that infection with L. amazonensis creates a population of antigen-responsive, CD44hi CD4+ T cells that proliferate and produce IL-2 but do not polarize to an effector phenotype and exhibit limited IFN-gamma production in response to IL-12. CD44 hi CD4+ T cells from L. amazonensis-infected mice fail to accumulate in culture as compared to cells from L ...