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Full-Text Articles in Cell Biology

Repositioning Of Muscle-Specific Genes Relative To The Periphery Of Sc-35 Domains During Skeletal Myogenesis, Phillip T. Moen, Carol V. Johnson, Meg Byron, Lindsay S. Shopland, Ivana L. De La Serna, Anthony N. Imbalzano, Jeanne B. Lawrence Nov 2003

Repositioning Of Muscle-Specific Genes Relative To The Periphery Of Sc-35 Domains During Skeletal Myogenesis, Phillip T. Moen, Carol V. Johnson, Meg Byron, Lindsay S. Shopland, Ivana L. De La Serna, Anthony N. Imbalzano, Jeanne B. Lawrence

Open Access Articles

Previous studies have shown that in a given cell type, certain active genes associate with SC-35 domains, nuclear regions rich in RNA metabolic factors and excluded from heterochromatin. This organization is not seen for all active genes; therefore, it is important to determine whether and when this locus-specific organization arises during development and differentiation of specific cell types. Here, we investigate whether gene organization relative to SC-35 domains is cell type specific by following several muscle and nonmuscle genes in human fibroblasts, committed but proliferative myoblasts, and terminally differentiated muscle. Although no change was seen for other loci, two muscle ...


Clustering Of Multiple Specific Genes And Gene-Rich R-Bands Around Sc-35 Domains: Evidence For Local Euchromatic Neighborhoods, Lindsay S. Shopland, Carol V. Johnson, Meg Byron, John A. Mcneil, Jeanne B. Lawrence Sep 2003

Clustering Of Multiple Specific Genes And Gene-Rich R-Bands Around Sc-35 Domains: Evidence For Local Euchromatic Neighborhoods, Lindsay S. Shopland, Carol V. Johnson, Meg Byron, John A. Mcneil, Jeanne B. Lawrence

Open Access Articles

Typically, eukaryotic nuclei contain 10-30 prominent domains (referred to here as SC-35 domains) that are concentrated in mRNA metabolic factors. Here, we show that multiple specific genes cluster around a common SC-35 domain, which contains multiple mRNAs. Nonsyntenic genes are capable of associating with a common domain, but domain "choice" appears random, even for two coordinately expressed genes. Active genes widely separated on different chromosome arms associate with the same domain frequently, assorting randomly into the 3-4 subregions of the chromosome periphery that contact a domain. Most importantly, visualization of six individual chromosome bands showed that large genomic segments ( approximately ...