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Full-Text Articles in Cell Biology

Detection And Treatment Of Critical Illnesses Using Oligonucleotides, Kevin Thomas Urak Dec 2018

Detection And Treatment Of Critical Illnesses Using Oligonucleotides, Kevin Thomas Urak

Theses and Dissertations

Sepsis is among the most prevalent diagnosed critical illnesses in the United States today. Although advances have reduced the overall morbidity and mortality associated with this illness, the enormous number of deaths associated with it shows a need for improved diagnostic and therapeutic optionsgent. Our laboratory has utilized RNA based technologies to aid in the treatment of histone induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome seen in sepsis.

Histones are proteins found in the nucleus of every cell in our body and have been shown to be released during sepsis. Such release induces damage to other cells, causing a feed forward cycle ...


Regulator Of G Protein Signaling 2 (Rgs2) In Preeclampsia: Association, Consequence, And Cause, Katherine Perschbacher Dec 2018

Regulator Of G Protein Signaling 2 (Rgs2) In Preeclampsia: Association, Consequence, And Cause, Katherine Perschbacher

Theses and Dissertations

Increased signaling of various hormones through their cognate G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs), including the angiotensin, endothelin, and vasopressin systems, are implicated in human preeclampsia (PreE) and animal models of the disorder. Cascade-specific termination of GPCR signaling following receptor activation is catalyzed by the Regulator of G protein Signaling (RGS) family members. Within the RGS B/R4 family, RGS5 and RGS2 are implicated in human PreE and gestational hypertensive disorders. Mutations within the RGS2 gene, a B/R4 RGS member, are associated with human hypertensive populations and increased risk of developing PreE and its sequelae. Given the role for the placenta ...


Investigations Of Hp1 And Insulator Partner Protein 1 (Hipp1), Steve Ehren Glenn Dec 2018

Investigations Of Hp1 And Insulator Partner Protein 1 (Hipp1), Steve Ehren Glenn

Theses and Dissertations

Drosophila HP1 and Insulator Partner Protein 1 (HIPP1) is the homologue of the human co-repressor Chromodomain Y family of proteins that repress neuronal gene expression in mammals. HIPP1 was identified by its extensive co-localization with Heterochromatin Protein 1a (HP1a) in heterochromatic regions of the genome and insulator binding proteins in euchromatic regions. The majority of HIPP1 binding to euchromatin is at binding sites for Drosophila Suppressor of Hairy-wing [Su(Hw)]. Su(Hw) is a zinc finger DNA binding protein that functions as an insulator, activator, and repressor. Transcriptional regulation by Su(Hw) is essential in the ovary and testis, where ...


Role Of Ppar[Gamma] And Retinol Binding Protein 7 In The Vascular Endothelium, Addison Wayne Woll Dec 2017

Role Of Ppar[Gamma] And Retinol Binding Protein 7 In The Vascular Endothelium, Addison Wayne Woll

Theses and Dissertations

Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) are a family of conserved ligand activated nuclear receptor transcription factors heterogeneously expressed in mammalian tissues. PPARγ is recognized as a master regulator of adipogenesis, fatty acid metabolism, and glucose homeostasis, but genetic evidence also supports the concept that PPARγ regulates the cardiovascular system, particularly vascular function and blood pressure. There is now compelling evidence that the beneficial blood pressure lowering effects of PPARγ activation are due to its activity in vascular smooth muscle and endothelium, through its modulation of nitric oxide-dependent vasomotor function. Endothelial PPARγ regulates the production and bioavailability of nitric oxide, while PPARγ ...


The Role Of Fgf21 In Regulating Energy Homeostasis, Magdalene Khang'ai Ameka Dec 2017

The Role Of Fgf21 In Regulating Energy Homeostasis, Magdalene Khang'ai Ameka

Theses and Dissertations

Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 (FGF21) is a hormone that is produced from the liver which has pleiotropic effects. Physiologically, FGF21 increases energy expenditure, increases glucose uptake, enhances glucose tolerance, and increases peripheral insulin sensitivity. Pharmacologically, FGF21 reverses obesity and diabetes in animal models and significantly improves metabolic profiles in humans through unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that the physiological actions of FGF21 may provide insights to explain FGF21’s beneficial pharmacological effects. The overall theme of this work was to identify the elusive mechanism by which FGF21 regulates energy homeostasis. In chapter 1, I review some adipokines and hepatokines that regulate ...


A Pitx2-Irx1 Regulatory Network Controls Dental Epithelial Stem Cell Differentiation During Tooth Development, Wenjie Yu Dec 2017

A Pitx2-Irx1 Regulatory Network Controls Dental Epithelial Stem Cell Differentiation During Tooth Development, Wenjie Yu

Theses and Dissertations

Tooth development is precisely controlled by epithelium-mesenchyme interactions, coordinated signaling pathways and associated transcription factors. Although the processes involved in tooth development are well established, details of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control tooth development are not fully understood. One of the primary unknown mechanisms is the regulation of dental epithelial stem cells (DESCs), including DESC specification, proliferation and differentiation. In this dissertation, I have addressed this gap in knowledge by studying the role of Pituitary homeobox 2 (Pitx2) and Iroquois 1 (Irx1) in teeth at the cellular and molecular level in mice. PITX2 contains mutations of which are ...


Sites Of Cgrp Action In Light Aversive Behavior: Implications For Migraine, Bianca Nicole Mason Dec 2017

Sites Of Cgrp Action In Light Aversive Behavior: Implications For Migraine, Bianca Nicole Mason

Theses and Dissertations

Migraine is a complex neurological disorder that affects approximately 38 million Americans. For over 25 years, the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of migraine. In fact, several pharmaceutical companies are tailoring treatments to antagonize CGRP actions. However, due to the complexity of migraine, exactly how and where CGRP acts to contribute to migraine have remained controversial: whereas several studies suggest that CGRP acts in the central nervous system (CNS) in this context, others have indicated a role in the periphery. Central nervous system sites of action include the trigeminal nucleus and several higher brain ...


Gynecological Tissue Homeostasis And Tumorigenesis Studies Using Mouse Models, Amy Guimaraes-Young Dec 2017

Gynecological Tissue Homeostasis And Tumorigenesis Studies Using Mouse Models, Amy Guimaraes-Young

Theses and Dissertations

Gynecological cancers present a tremendous disease burden worldwide. Endometrial cancer, the most common gynecological malignancy, is predominantly a disease of deranged glandular function. The mechanisms by which known environmental risk factors influence the mutational profile of endometrial cancer are poorly understood. Non-HPV vulvar cancer, on the other hand, is a very rare gynecological malignancy of vulvar squamous cells with little known about its pathogenesis. Surgical resection of vulvar cancer is associated with high post-surgical morbidity. Pivotal to improving treatment and outcomes for patients with gynecological cancers is an understanding of the molecular drivers unique to each tumor type.

To inform ...


Mechanisms Of Pathophysiology And Methods For Regeneration Of The Choriocapillaris In Age-Related Macular Degeneration, Kathleen Rose Chirco May 2017

Mechanisms Of Pathophysiology And Methods For Regeneration Of The Choriocapillaris In Age-Related Macular Degeneration, Kathleen Rose Chirco

Theses and Dissertations

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a devastating disease causing vision loss in millions of people around the world. Loss of choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) is one of the earliest detectable events in AMD, and, because the outer retina relies on the choriocapillaris for metabolic support, this loss may be the trigger for progression to more advanced stages. A crucial event that occurs in the aging choriocapillaris is accumulation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), which may result in complement-mediated CEC lysis, and may be a primary cause for AMD-associated choriocapillaris degeneration. Previous studies have also shown the accumulation of C-reactive ...


Tau Associates With Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Shp2, Yohan Kim May 2017

Tau Associates With Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Shp2, Yohan Kim

Theses and Dissertations

The microtubule-associated protein tau normally functions to bind to and stabilize microtubules. However, evidence now indicates that tau may also play a critical role in signaling pathways linked to neuronal development and neurodegeneration. The tau association with numerous signaling proteins such as tyrosine kinases, adaptor proteins, and scaffold proteins support this hypothesis. Phospho-Y18 tau was previously found in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain. Interestingly, this phosphorylation appeared to be regulated during neurodegeneration possibly by a tyrosine phosphatase(s). Identifying a candidate phosphatase, our lab found the association between tau and SHP2 in a neuronal cell line and dephosphorylation of phospho-Y18 ...


Novel Oncogenic Roles And Regulations Of Histone Demethylase Phf8 In Prostate Cancer, Peterson Kariuki Maina May 2017

Novel Oncogenic Roles And Regulations Of Histone Demethylase Phf8 In Prostate Cancer, Peterson Kariuki Maina

Theses and Dissertations

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer in American men. Although initial androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) confers a five year survival rate of 99%, the relapse of metastatic and drug resistant PCa (CRPC- Castration-Resistant PCa) continues to account for most deaths. How certain PCa cells develop into CRPC is the key question in the field. In addressing it, attention has focused on epigenetic factors that contribute to CRPC development. Herein we investigated the role and regulation of histone demethylase PHF8 during PCa neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) and progression into CRPC. We utilized bioinformatic analyses and biochemical approaches in PCa/CRPC ...


Redox Regulation Of Vascular Thrombosis And Stroke By Methionine Oxidation, Sean Xiang Gu May 2017

Redox Regulation Of Vascular Thrombosis And Stroke By Methionine Oxidation, Sean Xiang Gu

Theses and Dissertations

Redox biology is fundamental to both normal cellular homeostasis and pathological states associated with excessive oxidative stress. In the vascular system, redox reactions help regulate key physiological responses such as cell adhesion, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, angiogenesis, inflammatory gene expression, and apoptosis. During pathological states, altered redox balance can cause vascular cell dysfunction and contribute to disease. It is well known that vascular diseases are associated with increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms connecting elevated vascular ROS and disease pathogenesis. A growing number of vascular and hemostatic proteins are recognized to undergo ...


Sensing Extracellular Stress: Key Features Of The Anti-Sigma Factor Rsiv In Sensing Lysozyme, Paige Kies Jan 2017

Sensing Extracellular Stress: Key Features Of The Anti-Sigma Factor Rsiv In Sensing Lysozyme, Paige Kies

Honors Theses at the University of Iowa

Bacillus subtilis is a soil dwelling organism which uses alternative extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors that respond to environmental stressors encountered by a cell. Upon encountering a signal, ECF sigma factors are activated and bind RNAP to initiate transcription of genes that confer resistance to stressors that threaten cellular integrity [5]. One such factor, sigmaV (sV), is required by B. subtilis for resistance to lysozyme. In the absence of lysozyme, sV is inhibited by the anti-sigma factor, RsiV, which is a transmembrane protein that has an extracellular lysozyme sensing domain. RsiV binds lysozyme, allowing for regulated intramembrane proteolysis ...


Generating Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Choroirdal Endothelium To Study And Treat Macular Degeneration, Allison Elaine Songstad Dec 2016

Generating Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Choroirdal Endothelium To Study And Treat Macular Degeneration, Allison Elaine Songstad

Theses and Dissertations

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in the Western world. Although, the majority of stem cell research to date has focused on production of RPE and photoreceptor cells for the purpose of evaluating disease pathophysiology and cell replacement, there is strong evidence that the choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) that form the choriocapillaris vessels are the first to be affected in this disease. As such, to accurately evaluate disease pathophysiology and develop an effective treatment, production of patient-specific stem cell-derived CECs will be required.

During the first stage of my Ph.D work, represented in Chapter ...


Graph Theory Analysis Of Single Cell Transcriptomes Define Islet Signaling Networks And Cell Identity, Scott Robert Tyler Dec 2016

Graph Theory Analysis Of Single Cell Transcriptomes Define Islet Signaling Networks And Cell Identity, Scott Robert Tyler

Theses and Dissertations

Several challenges face bioinformaticians on a regular basis. One of these is unsupervised clustering. In RNA sequencing (RNAseq), this may come in the form of blindly sequencing single cells without a priori knowledge of the cell types being sequenced. Here we create new methods to address this problem that show increased accuracy and speed compared to competing methods. We also have developed a methodology for discovering non-parametric networks which represent relationships between the variables that have been measured across samples. In the context of RNAseq, this is the expression relationships between genes (for example a positive or negative Spearman correlation ...


Regulation Of The Signal Transduction Pathways Of The Unfolded Protein Response During Chronic And Physiological Er Stresses, Javier Alejandro Gomez Vargas Aug 2016

Regulation Of The Signal Transduction Pathways Of The Unfolded Protein Response During Chronic And Physiological Er Stresses, Javier Alejandro Gomez Vargas

Theses and Dissertations

The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated by protein misfolding stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The UPR is a transcriptional program that aims to maintain ER folding capacity, where imbalances between protein load and processing ability is termed ER stress. Signal transduction of the UPR begins with 3 ER-resident transmembrane sensors: PERK, IRE1 and ATF6. All sensors initiate downstream signaling cascades which culminate in improved protein folding, transcriptional upregulation of genes encoding ER chaperones, and mechanisms to reduce translational and transcriptional ER load, therefore re-establishing ER homeostasis. The signaling cascades of each sensor are distinct but cooperative, and involve ...


Targeting Unique Oxidative Metabolism Of Clonogenic Multiple Myeloma Cells For Therapy, Jeanine C. Schibler Aug 2016

Targeting Unique Oxidative Metabolism Of Clonogenic Multiple Myeloma Cells For Therapy, Jeanine C. Schibler

Theses and Dissertations

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell neoplasm that remains incurable despite utilization of aggressive protocols that combine conventional and novel chemotherapy drugs. Recent studies show that drug resistance can be attributable to genetic and developmental heterogeneity in MM. One theory for the high rates of relapse and refractory disease is the existence of a pool of cancer stem cells in MM. We predict that identifying metabolic differences in the MM stem-like cells could offer novel pathways to create combination therapies that would improve the clinical outcome for patients. Utilizing human MM cell lines, we characterized the stem-like population under ...


Adult Stem Cells In The Trachea And Tracheal Submucosal Glands, Thomas John Lynch Aug 2016

Adult Stem Cells In The Trachea And Tracheal Submucosal Glands, Thomas John Lynch

Theses and Dissertations

Breathing is essential for human life, yet tens of millions of people in the U.S. alone suffer from lung diseases. With each breath, lungs are exposed to the external environment. Inhaled air first passes through the trachea, bronchi, and finally the bronchioles before it reaches the alveoli where gases are exchanged. A barrier of epithelial cells protects the airways. In addition, epithelial glands also secrete protein-rich fluids onto the airway surfaces to help maintain sterility. Injury, disease, or other factors can damage these cells, and regiospecific stem cells (SCs) can divide to replace them. However, many important details about ...


New Molecular Mechanisms Controlling Dental Epithelial Stem Cell Maintenance, Growth And Craniofacial Morphogenesis, Zhao Sun May 2016

New Molecular Mechanisms Controlling Dental Epithelial Stem Cell Maintenance, Growth And Craniofacial Morphogenesis, Zhao Sun

Theses and Dissertations

The regenerative tissues such as hair follicles, intestine and teeth have a particular microenvironment known as “stem cell niche” which houses stem cells and act as a signaling center to control stem cell fate. The precise and timely regulation of stem cell renewal and differentiation is essential for tissue formation, growth and homeostasis over the course of a lifetime. However, the molecular underpinning to control this regulation is poorly understood. To address this issue, we use the continuously growing mouse incisor as a model to study the gene regulatory network which controls dental epithelial stem cell (DESC) maintenance, growth and ...


Regulation Of Pol Ii Transcription And Mrna Capping, Kyle Andrew Nilson May 2016

Regulation Of Pol Ii Transcription And Mrna Capping, Kyle Andrew Nilson

Theses and Dissertations

In humans, RNA polymerase II is the sole source of messenger RNAs that are ultimately translated into proteins and its transcriptional activity is highly regulated.

Mechanisms have evolved to control which, when, and to what degree genes are transcribed. Because most cells have the same genome, control of transcription is essential in maintaining cellular identity. Misregulation of Pol II transcription is a hallmark of both cancer and retroviral infection. This research investigates the regulation of Pol II transcription and related co-transcriptional mRNA capping.

Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments were used to characterize the composition of nucleosomes and Pol II, DSIF and NELF ...


The Role Of Nlr Proteins In Leishmaniasis, Gwendolyn Mary Clay May 2016

The Role Of Nlr Proteins In Leishmaniasis, Gwendolyn Mary Clay

Theses and Dissertations

Leishmania species are vector-borne protozoan parasites that cause a spectrum of human diseases, with an estimated 12 million people infected in 88 countries. Inflammation plays distinct roles in the different clinical syndromes. Visceral leishmaniasis, in which parasites migrate from the site of infection and proliferate in liver and spleen, is accompanied by systemic immune suppression. Cutaneous leishmaniasis, where parasites remain at the site of inoculation and create a long-term ulcer, is associated with vigorous systemic immunity to the parasite. The innate immune sensing pathways responding to Leishmania spp. parasites are not fully described.

NLR proteins are a class of structurally ...


Trpm7 Function In Zebrafish Dopaminergic Neurons, Amanda R. Decker Dec 2015

Trpm7 Function In Zebrafish Dopaminergic Neurons, Amanda R. Decker

Theses and Dissertations

TRPM7 (Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin-like 7) is an ion channel necessary for the proper development of many cell types. Insight into the precise role of the channel in different cells has been hampered by the lethality of knocking out the gene in model organisms such as the mouse. Here I examine a zebrafish that has a loss-of-function mutation in the gene encoding Trpm7. First, I show that trpm7 is important for the function of developing dopaminergic neurons in the zebrafish. Second, I examine the interaction between trpm7 and the related gene vmat2 in order to develop a cellular mechanism of ...


Dab2 Plays A Role In The Post-Endocytic Trafficking Of Vegfr2, Shivangi Makarand Inamdar Dec 2015

Dab2 Plays A Role In The Post-Endocytic Trafficking Of Vegfr2, Shivangi Makarand Inamdar

Theses and Dissertations

Angiogenesis is a crucial process under both physiological and pathological conditions. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A and its cognate receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) are key regulators of angiogenesis. Plasma membrane (PM) levels of VEGFR2 are regulated by de novo synthesis, and by both exocytic and endocytic trafficking. VEGF-binding to VEGFR2 induces phosphorylation of key tyrosine residues located in the cytosolic domain of the receptor, followed by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and signal transduction leading to vascular morphogenesis. Disabled protein 2 (Dab2) is a cytosolic, clathrin-adaptor protein that is known to regulate endocytosis of certain cell surface receptors ...


Dual Roles For An Intracellular Calcium-Signaling Pathway In Regulating Synaptic Homeostasis And Neuronal Excitability, Douglas J Brusich Jul 2015

Dual Roles For An Intracellular Calcium-Signaling Pathway In Regulating Synaptic Homeostasis And Neuronal Excitability, Douglas J Brusich

Theses and Dissertations

Neurons are specialized cells that communicate via electrical and chemical signaling. It is well-known that homeostatic mechanisms exist to potentiate neuronal output when activity falls. Likewise, while neurons rely on excitable states to function, these same excitable states must be kept in check for stable function. However, the identity of molecular factors and pathways regulating these pathways remain elusive.

Chapter 2 of this thesis reports the findings from an RNA interference- and electrophysiology-based screen to identify factors necessary for the long-term maintenance of homeostatic synaptic potentiation. Data is reported to resolve a long-standing question as to the role of presynaptic ...


Investigation And Application Of Novel Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors For Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy, Benjamin Richard Steines May 2015

Investigation And Application Of Novel Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors For Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy, Benjamin Richard Steines

Theses and Dissertations

Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a lethal autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. CFTR transports anions at the apical surface of epithelial membranes and functions in many areas of the body. However in CF, loss of CFTR function in the lungs is the major source of morbidity and mortality. Replacing the defective CFTR in the lungs through gene therapy has the potential to cure the disease. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) is an effective gene transfer vector and has been used extensively to deliver genes to cells in culture. A number of ...


Tropism Of Human Pegivirus (Formerly Known As Gb Virus C) And Host Immunomodulation : Insights Into Viral Persistence, Ernest Tafara Chivero May 2015

Tropism Of Human Pegivirus (Formerly Known As Gb Virus C) And Host Immunomodulation : Insights Into Viral Persistence, Ernest Tafara Chivero

Theses and Dissertations

Human Pegivirus (HPgV; originally called GB virus C) is an RNA virus within the Pegivirus genus of the Flaviviridae that commonly causes persistent infection. Worldwide, approximately 750 million people are infected with HPgV. No causal association between HPgV and disease has been identified; however, several studies found an association between persistent HPgV infection and prolonged survival of HIV-infected individuals that appears to be related to a reduction in host immune activation. HPgV replicates well in vivo (>10 million genome copies/ml plasma) but grows poorly in vitro and systems to study this virus are limited. Consequently, mechanisms of viral persistence ...


Molecular Mechanisms Of The Anti-Cancer Action Of Schweinfurthins, Chaoqun Zheng May 2015

Molecular Mechanisms Of The Anti-Cancer Action Of Schweinfurthins, Chaoqun Zheng

Theses and Dissertations

Schweinfurthins are a family of natural products with significant anti-cancer activities. They were originally identified in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) human 60 cancer cell line screening. The growth inhibition profile of schweinfurthins is distinct from other clinically used anti-cancer agents, indicating that they have a novel mechanism of action or have a previously unrecognized protein target. Previous studies showed that schweinfurthins affect multiple cellular processes in cancer cells. For example, schweinfurthins can alter cytoskeleton organization, induce ER stress and apoptosis, and inhibit the mevalonate pathway. The mevalonate pathway is responsible for the production of isoprenoids and cholesterol, which have ...


The Transcription Factor Activator Protein Family Of Genes In Mammary Gland Development And Breast Cancer Progression, Jung Park May 2015

The Transcription Factor Activator Protein Family Of Genes In Mammary Gland Development And Breast Cancer Progression, Jung Park

Theses and Dissertations

Breast cancer is currently the second most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of death due to cancer in the United States. Breast cancer itself is subdivided into at least four subtypes, luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, and basal-like, based on genomewide molecular expression patterns. Luminal A is the most common form and typically characterized by high levels of estrogen receptor (ER). HER2-enriched cancers usually, but not always, harbor amplified copies of the HER2 oncogene. Luminal B cancers share characteristics with the luminal A and HER2-enriched subtypes. Finally, basal-like cancers are more oftentimes defined by their lack ...


Molecular Basis Of Insulin Resistance In Bardet Biedl Syndrome, Rachel Diaz Starks May 2015

Molecular Basis Of Insulin Resistance In Bardet Biedl Syndrome, Rachel Diaz Starks

Theses and Dissertations

Bardet Biedl Syndrome (BBS) displays heterogeneity in the genes involved and clinical features. Mutations in 19 genes have been associated with BBS. Eight BBS proteins (BBS1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9 and 18) form the BBSome. Assembly of the BBSome is mediated by three BBS proteins (BBS6, 10, 12) in a complex with the CCT/Tric chaperonins. The BBSome is involved in formation and maintenance of primary cilia and vesicle trafficking. The clinical features of BBS include obesity, degenerative retinopathy, polydactyly, renal dysfunction, hypogonadism, and learning disability. Diabetes mellitus is commonly associated with BBS, but the mechanisms remain unknown ...


Molecular Regulation Of Nox1 Nadph Oxidase In Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Activation, Jennifer Lee Streeter May 2015

Molecular Regulation Of Nox1 Nadph Oxidase In Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Activation, Jennifer Lee Streeter

Theses and Dissertations

Nox1 is of considerable importance because of its involvement in a wide variety of pathologies. Activation of Nox1 induces generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell migration, events critical for the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, amyotropic lateral sclerosis, gastrointestinal disease, immunological disorders, and multiple forms of cancer [1-8]. In order to best determine how to treat Nox1-mediated disease, we must gain a better understanding of the mechanisms that control Nox1 activation. Within the last decade, many studies have found that protein phosphorylation and protein trafficking are critical regulatory mechanisms that control the activation of multiple Nox proteins. Yet, to ...