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Full-Text Articles in Cell Biology

Shar-Pei Mediates Cell Proliferation Arrest During Imaginal Disc Growth In Drosophila, Madhuri Kango-Singh, Riitta Nolo, Chunyao Tao, Patrik Verstreken, P. Robin Hiesinger, Hugo J. Bellen, Georg Halder Dec 2002

Shar-Pei Mediates Cell Proliferation Arrest During Imaginal Disc Growth In Drosophila, Madhuri Kango-Singh, Riitta Nolo, Chunyao Tao, Patrik Verstreken, P. Robin Hiesinger, Hugo J. Bellen, Georg Halder

Biology Faculty Publications

During animal development, organ size is determined primarily by the amount of cell proliferation, which must be tightly regulated to ensure the generation of properly proportioned organs. However, little is known about the molecular pathways that direct cells to stop proliferating when an organ has attained its proper size. We have identified mutations in a novel gene, shar-pei, that is required for proper termination of cell proliferation during Drosophila imaginal disc development. Clones of shar-pei mutant cells in imaginal discs produce enlarged tissues containing more cells of normal size. We show that this phenotype is the result of both increased ...


The D0 Domain Of Kir3d Acts As A Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Binding Enhancer, Salim I. Khakoo, Ron Geller, Sunny Shin, Jomaquai A. Jenkins, Peter Parham Oct 2002

The D0 Domain Of Kir3d Acts As A Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Binding Enhancer, Salim I. Khakoo, Ron Geller, Sunny Shin, Jomaquai A. Jenkins, Peter Parham

Department of Microbiology Papers

In contrast to the KIR2D:HLA-C interaction, little is known of KIR3DL1's interaction with HLA-B or the role of D0, the domain not present in KIR2D. Differences in the strength and specificity for major histocompatibility complex class I of KIR3DL1 and its common chimpanzee homologue Pt-KIR3DL1/2 were exploited to address these questions. Domain-swap, deletion, and site-directed mutants of KIR3DL1 were analyzed for HLA-B binding using a novel, positively signaling cell–cell binding assay. Natural ‘deletion’ of residues 50 and 51 from its D0 domain causes Pt-KIR3DL1/2 to bind Bw4+ HLA-B allotypes more avidly than does KIR3DL1. Deletion ...


Eye Suppression, A Novel Function Of Teashirt, Requires Wingless Signaling, Amit Singh, Madhuri Kango-Singh, Y. Henry Sun Sep 2002

Eye Suppression, A Novel Function Of Teashirt, Requires Wingless Signaling, Amit Singh, Madhuri Kango-Singh, Y. Henry Sun

Biology Faculty Publications

Teashirt (tsh) encodes a Drosophila zinc-finger protein. Misexpression of tsh has been shown to induce ectopic eye formation in the antenna. We report that tsh can suppress eye development. This novel function of tsh is due to the induction of homothorax (hth), a known repressor of eye development, and requires Wingless (WG) signaling. Interestingly, tsh has different functions in the dorsal and ventral eye, suppressing eye development close to the ventral margin, while promoting eye development near the dorsal margin. It affects both growth of eye disc and retinal cell differentiation.


Functional Requirement Of Aquaporin-5 In Plasma Membranes Of Sweat Glands, Lene N. Nejsum, Tae-Hwan Kwon, Uffe B. Jensen, Ornella Fumagalli, Jørgen Frøkiaer, Carissa M. Krane, Anil G. Menon, Landon S. King, Peter C. Agre, Søren Nielsen Jan 2002

Functional Requirement Of Aquaporin-5 In Plasma Membranes Of Sweat Glands, Lene N. Nejsum, Tae-Hwan Kwon, Uffe B. Jensen, Ornella Fumagalli, Jørgen Frøkiaer, Carissa M. Krane, Anil G. Menon, Landon S. King, Peter C. Agre, Søren Nielsen

Biology Faculty Publications

The distribution and function of aquaporins (AQPs) have not previously been defined in sweat glands. In this study, AQP1, AQP3, and AQP5 mRNA were demonstrated in rat paw by reverse transcription (RT)–PCR, but AQP2 and AQP4 were not. AQP1, AQP3, and AQP5 protein were confirmed in these tissues by immunoblotting. AQP1 was identified in capillary endothelial cells by immunohistochemical labeling, but not in sweat glands or epidermis. Abundant AQP3 expression was seen in basal levels of epidermis, but not in sweat glands. AQP2 and AQP4 were not observed in either skin or sweat glands. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed abundant AQP5 ...