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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Cell Biology

Constitutive Expression Of Thioglucoside Glucohydrolase 1 (Tgg1) Decreases Intercellular Trafficking In Arabidopsis Thaliana, Alessandro Francesco Sarno Apr 2018

Constitutive Expression Of Thioglucoside Glucohydrolase 1 (Tgg1) Decreases Intercellular Trafficking In Arabidopsis Thaliana, Alessandro Francesco Sarno

EURēCA: Exhibition of Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievement

Plasmodesmata (PD) are pores that traverse plant cell walls, providing a route for intercellular trafficking of essential metabolites, nutrients, and signaling molecules between adjacent plant cells, thereby aiding communication. The increased size exclusion limit 2 (ise2) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana has an increased abundance of branched PD, as well as a greater flux of intercellular trafficking. A search for proteins that interact with ISE2 identified THIOGLUCOSIDE GLUCOHYDROLASE 2 (a myrosinase). A. thaliana also encodes a second, closely-related myrosinase, TGG1. Myrosinases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of glucosinolates, a type of secondary metabolite that are amino acid derivatives. The breakdown ...


Mapping Netrin Signaling In Tetrahymena Thermophila, Katelyn R. Malik, Bethany C. Khol, Stephanie J. Hermann, Kenneth W. Ward, Daniele T. Modderman, Heather G. Kuruvilla Apr 2018

Mapping Netrin Signaling In Tetrahymena Thermophila, Katelyn R. Malik, Bethany C. Khol, Stephanie J. Hermann, Kenneth W. Ward, Daniele T. Modderman, Heather G. Kuruvilla

The Research and Scholarship Symposium (2013-2019)

The netrin family of proteins, found throughout the animal kingdom, are well known for their roles in developmental signaling. Netrin-1, the best-studied member of this family, signals through four receptor types in vertebrates: the UNC-5 family, DCC, neogenin, and DSCAM. We have previously characterized a netrin-1-like protein in the ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena thermophila. This protein is secreted from Tetrahymena, and functions as a chemorepellent. Since a netrin-like protein is produced by this organism, we hypothesized that some components of the vertebrate netrin signaling pathway might also be present in Tetrahymena. Through immunolocalization on the plasma membrane of the cell, we ...


Netrin-3 Signals Through Serine Phosphorylation In Tetrahymena Thermophila, Cayla C. Eckley, Rebecca N. Haught, Kyle J. Hooper, Jared E. Matz, Joshua L. Wilson, Bethany C. Khol, Katelyn R. Malik, Heather G. Kuruvilla Apr 2018

Netrin-3 Signals Through Serine Phosphorylation In Tetrahymena Thermophila, Cayla C. Eckley, Rebecca N. Haught, Kyle J. Hooper, Jared E. Matz, Joshua L. Wilson, Bethany C. Khol, Katelyn R. Malik, Heather G. Kuruvilla

The Research and Scholarship Symposium (2013-2019)

The netrin family of proteins are structurally related to laminin and, while first discovered in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, are now known to be present in species throughout the animal kingdom, including humans. These proteins also have a wide variety of roles that include inhibition of apoptosis, chemorepulsion, and axonal guidance. Due to the results of previous studies involving netrin-1 in vertebrate systems, the current prevailing assumption is that netrins, when acting as chemorepellents, signal using tyrosine kinases. However, data that we gathered through phosphoserine-targeting ELISA assays and immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrates that the netrin-3 peptides signal Tetrahymena thermophila through serine ...


Netrin-3: Tracking The Elusive Antimitotic Signal On The Western Frontier, Michael David Jolley, Kirsten P. Kelley, Jared E. Matz, Natalie S. Phillips, Emma Wessels, Heather G. Kuruvilla Apr 2018

Netrin-3: Tracking The Elusive Antimitotic Signal On The Western Frontier, Michael David Jolley, Kirsten P. Kelley, Jared E. Matz, Natalie S. Phillips, Emma Wessels, Heather G. Kuruvilla

The Research and Scholarship Symposium (2013-2019)

Netrin-3 is a guidance protein expressed throughout the animal kingdom, and involved in the development of branched structures such as the nervous system, lung, and mammary gland. We have previously shown that peptides derived from this protein serve as chemorepellents and mitotic inhibitors in Tetrahymena thermophila. Our previous work shows that Tetrahymena synthesize and secrete a netrin-3-like protein, as detected by ELISA. In this study, we find that a netrin-3-like protein is present in whole cell extract and secreted protein, as detected by Western blotting. A protein of approximately 48 kD is consistently detected in our Western blots. In addition ...


Netrin-3 Peptide (C-19) Is A Chemorepellent And A Growth Inhibitor In Tetrahymena Thermophila, Jennifer N. Felzien, Brandon R. Kalb, Bethany C. Khol, Katelyn R. Malik, Matthew S. Merical, Lois Parks, David Paulding, Shannon Rappaport, Kenneth W. Ward, Heather G. Kuruvilla Apr 2017

Netrin-3 Peptide (C-19) Is A Chemorepellent And A Growth Inhibitor In Tetrahymena Thermophila, Jennifer N. Felzien, Brandon R. Kalb, Bethany C. Khol, Katelyn R. Malik, Matthew S. Merical, Lois Parks, David Paulding, Shannon Rappaport, Kenneth W. Ward, Heather G. Kuruvilla

The Research and Scholarship Symposium (2013-2019)

The netrins are a family of signaling proteins expressed throughout the animal kingdom. Netrins play important roles in developmental processes such as axonal guidance and angiogenesis. Netrin-1, for example, can act as either a chemoattractant or a chemorepellent for axonal growth cones depending upon the concentration of the protein as well as the cell type. Netrin-1 acts as a growth factor in some mammalian cell types and is also expressed by some tumor cells. Netrin-3 appears to share some signaling apparatus with netrin-1, but is less widely expressed, and its physiological roles are much less understood. Netrin-3 is also used ...


Viewing The Extracellular Matrix: An Imaging Method For Tissue Engineering, Michael Drakopoulos, Sarah Calve Aug 2015

Viewing The Extracellular Matrix: An Imaging Method For Tissue Engineering, Michael Drakopoulos, Sarah Calve

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Symposium

The field of regenerative medicine seeks to create replacement tissues and organs, both to repair deficiencies in biological function and to treat structural damage caused by injury. Scaffoldings mimicking extracellular matrix (ECM), the structure to which cells attach to form tissues, have been developed from synthetic polymers and also been prepared by decellularizing adult tissue. However, the structure of ECM undergoes significant remodeling during natural tissue repair, suggesting that ECM-replacement constructs that mirror developing tissues may promote better regeneration than those modeled on adult tissues. This work investigated the effectiveness of a method of viewing the extracellular matrix of developing ...


Reverse Gyrase Is Not Necessary For Survival Of Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus Furiosus, Farshid Taghizadeh, Michael S. Bartlett May 2015

Reverse Gyrase Is Not Necessary For Survival Of Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus Furiosus, Farshid Taghizadeh, Michael S. Bartlett

Student Research Symposium

Reverse gyrase is the only known topoisomerase enzyme with positive supercoiling activity on covalently-closed DNA. This positive supercoiling is required to prevent DNA from denaturation at high temperatures. The gene that codes for this protein is present in all hyperthermophiles and absent from all mesophilic and thermophilic genomes, suggesting that this enzyme is the only hyperthermophile-specific protein. To investigate if this protein is vital for the cells, we knocked out its gene from the genome of living organism Pyrococcus furiosus. Pyrococcus furiosus is a hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows between 70°C to 103°C with an optimum growth temperature of ...


Activin Limits Progenitor Capability By Promoting Epithelial Cell Differentiation In The Mammary Gland, Karen A. Dunphy, Thiruppavai Chandrasekaran, Niraj Bhatt, Michelle Chen, Amy L. Roberts, Mary Hagen, D. Joseph Jerry May 2014

Activin Limits Progenitor Capability By Promoting Epithelial Cell Differentiation In The Mammary Gland, Karen A. Dunphy, Thiruppavai Chandrasekaran, Niraj Bhatt, Michelle Chen, Amy L. Roberts, Mary Hagen, D. Joseph Jerry

UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Research Retreat

Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and activin utilize common signaling pathways, via smad2/3 and smad4, to mediate tumor suppression by effecting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Differences in temporal expression patterns suggest that each cytokine has specific roles in mammary gland development. Activin is expressed during pregnancy and lactation and is required for branching and lactogenesis, implying a role in mammary gland maturation. In contrast, TGF-beta is expressed during involution during mammary gland regression and functions to re-organize the mammary epithelial content to the non-lactating state. Previously, we found that TGF-beta and activin do share common signaling pathways allowing ...


The Release Of Calcium In Bacillus Anthracis Pathogenicity Methods, Natiera Magnuson, Manomita Patra Bhowmik, Maria Elena Reynaga, Ernesto Abel-Santos Apr 2011

The Release Of Calcium In Bacillus Anthracis Pathogenicity Methods, Natiera Magnuson, Manomita Patra Bhowmik, Maria Elena Reynaga, Ernesto Abel-Santos

Festival of Communities: UG Symposium (Posters)

Anthrax infection starts with germination of Bacillus anthracis spores in macrophages. Some bacteria, including B. anthracis, can sporulate in response to environmental stress, such as starvation. During germination, large concentrations of calcium ions are released from the B. anthracis spore. Calcium ions are hydrophilic secondary messengers, and may therefore interfere with detection of the spore by confusing the cell signaling pathways. We investigated calcium release on infected macrophage viability by replacing the calcium stored in B. anthracis spores for other cations via demineralization/remineralization. It was discovered that calcium ions typically out-performed other cations in germination of B. anthracis.