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Full-Text Articles in Cell Biology

The Epidermis Still In Control?, Winfried Peters, A. Tomos Aug 1996

The Epidermis Still In Control?, Winfried Peters, A. Tomos

Winfried S. Peters

This paper has no abstract; these are the first two paragraphs. The search for a molecular mechanism of auxin action has rendered the “Auxin-Binding-Protein 1” (ABP-1) the top candidate for a functional auxin receptor (Venis and Napier, 1995), although its status remains disputed (Jones, 1994; Hertel, 1995; Napier, 1995; Venis, 1995). ABP-1 had long been thought to be localized exclusively in epidermal cells in coleoptiles (Löbler and Klämbt, 1985), and thus had fitted nicely the “epidermal-growth-control-hypothesis” (Kutschera, 1987, 1992). The recent report from the same lab of its uniform distribution throughout the coleoptile (Kayser and Klämbt, 1995) not only rises ...


The History Of Tissue Tension, Winfried S. Peters, A. Deri Tomos Jun 1996

The History Of Tissue Tension, Winfried S. Peters, A. Deri Tomos

Winfried S. Peters

In recent years the phenomenon of tissue tension and its functional connection to elongation growth has regained much interest. In the present study we reconstruct older models of mechanical inhomogenities in growing plant organs, in order to establish an accurate historical background for the current discussion. We focus on the iatromechanic model developed in Stephen Hales' Vegetable Staticks, Wilhelm Hofmeister's mechanical model of negative geotropism, Julius Sachs' explanation of the development of tissue tension, and the differential-auxin-response-hypothesis by Kenneth Thimann and Charles Schneider. Each of these models is considered in the context of its respective historic and theoretical environment ...


Review: To Bud Until Death: The Genetics Of Aging In The Yeast, Saccharomyces, Father Nicanor Austriaco Dec 1995

Review: To Bud Until Death: The Genetics Of Aging In The Yeast, Saccharomyces, Father Nicanor Austriaco

Rev. Nicanor Austriaco, O.P.

Individual cells of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have a limited division capacity and undergo characteristicchanges as they senesce, primarily increasing both their cell size and cell cycle time. The mortality curve for ageing yeast cells can be described by the Gompertz equation, the classical definition for an ageing population. Recent work from several laboratories has demonstrated that genes can determine the yeast lifespan. Studies with the UTH genes have implicated changes in transcriptional silencing during yeast ageing, but the roles of the RAS2, LAG1 and PHBl genes in regulating yeast longevity are still unclear. What is becoming clearer, however ...