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Full-Text Articles in Cell Biology

Essential Role Of The Crk Family-Dosage In Digeorge-Like Anomaly And Metabolic Homeostasis, Akira Imamoto, Sewon Ki, Leiming Li, Kazunari Iwamoto, Venkat Maruthamuthu, John Devany, Ocean Lu, Suxiang Zhang, Takuji Yamada, Akiyoshi Hirayama, Shinji Fukuda, Yutaka Suzuki, Mariko Okada Feb 2020

Essential Role Of The Crk Family-Dosage In Digeorge-Like Anomaly And Metabolic Homeostasis, Akira Imamoto, Sewon Ki, Leiming Li, Kazunari Iwamoto, Venkat Maruthamuthu, John Devany, Ocean Lu, Suxiang Zhang, Takuji Yamada, Akiyoshi Hirayama, Shinji Fukuda, Yutaka Suzuki, Mariko Okada

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Faculty Publications

CRK and CRKL (CRK-like) encode adapter proteins with similar biochemical properties. Here, we show that a 50% reduction of the family-combined dosage generates developmental defects, including aspects of DiGeorge/del22q11 syndrome in mice. Like the mouse homologs of two 22q11.21 genes CRKL and TBX1, Crk and Tbx1 also genetically interact, thus suggesting that pathways shared by the three genes participate in organogenesis affected in the syndrome. We also show that Crk and Crkl are required during mesoderm development, and Crk/Crkl deficiency results in small cell size and abnormal mesenchyme behavior in primary embryonic fibroblasts. Our systems-wide analyses reveal ...


Normal Glycolytic Enzyme Activity Is Critical For Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1a Activity And Provides Novel Targets For Inhibiting Tumor Growth, Geoffrey Grandjean Phd Dec 2015

Normal Glycolytic Enzyme Activity Is Critical For Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1a Activity And Provides Novel Targets For Inhibiting Tumor Growth, Geoffrey Grandjean Phd

UT GSBS Dissertations and Theses (Open Access)

Normal Glycolytic Enzyme Activity is Critical for Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α Activity and Provides Novel Targets for Inhibiting Tumor Growth

By Geoffrey Grandjean

Advisory Professor: Garth Powis, D. Phil

Unique to proliferating cancer cells is the observation that their increased need for energy is provided by a high rate of glycolysis followed by lactic acid fermentation in a process known as the Warburg Effect, a process many times less efficient than oxidative phosphorylation employed by normal cells to satisfy a similar energy demand [1]. This high rate of glycolysis occurs regardless of the concentration of oxygen in the cell and is ...