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Cancer Biology Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Cancer Biology

The Role Of Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 In Receptor Trafficking And Disease, Kaia K. Hampton Jan 2017

The Role Of Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 In Receptor Trafficking And Disease, Kaia K. Hampton

Theses and Dissertations--Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences

The progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) is a multifunctional protein with a heme-binding domain that promotes cellular signaling via receptor trafficking, and is essential for some elements of tumor growth and metastasis. PGRMC1 is upregulated in breast, colon, lung and thyroid tumors. We expanded the analysis of PGRMC1 in the clinical setting, and report the first analysis of PGRMC1 in human oral cavity and ovarian tumors and found PGRMC1 to correlate with lung and ovarian cancer patient survival. Furthermore, we discovered a specific role for PGRMC1 in cancer stem cell viability. PGRMC1 directly associates with the epidermal growth factor ...


The Linkage Between Transcription Control And Epigenetic Regulation: The Snail Story And Beyond, Yiwei Lin Jan 2012

The Linkage Between Transcription Control And Epigenetic Regulation: The Snail Story And Beyond, Yiwei Lin

Theses and Dissertations--Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences

Epigenetic deregulation contributes significantly to the development of multiple human diseases, including cancer. While great effort has been made to elucidate the underlying mechanism, our knowledge on epigenetic regulation is still fragmentary, an important gap being how the diverse epigenetic events coordinate to control gene transcription. In the first part of our study, we demonstrated an important link between Snail-mediated transcriptional control and epigenetic regulation during cancer development. Specifically, we found that the highly conserved SNAG domain of Snail sequentially and structurally mimics the N-terminal tail of histone H3, thereby functions as a molecular “hook”, or pseudo substrate, for recruiting ...