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Full-Text Articles in Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

Killerflip: A Novel Lytic Peptide Specifically Inducing Cancer Cell Death, B Pennarun, G. Gaidos, O Bucur, A Tinari Oct 2013

Killerflip: A Novel Lytic Peptide Specifically Inducing Cancer Cell Death, B Pennarun, G. Gaidos, O Bucur, A Tinari

Open Dartmouth: Peer-reviewed articles by Dartmouth faculty

One of the objectives in the development of effective cancer therapy is induction of tumor-selective cell death. Toward this end, we have identified a small peptide that, when introduced into cells via a TAT cell-delivery system, shows a remarkably potent cytoxicity in a variety of cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in vivo, whereas sparing normal cells and tissues. This fusion peptide was named killer FLIP as its sequence was derived from the C-terminal domain of c-FLIP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Using structure activity analysis, we determined the minimal bioactive core of killerFLIP, namely killerFLIP-E. Structural analysis of cells using ...


New Tools For Real-Time Study Of Embryonic Development, Lauren M. Browning Jan 2013

New Tools For Real-Time Study Of Embryonic Development, Lauren M. Browning

Theses and Dissertations in Biomedical Sciences

Embryonic development represents one of the most complex and dynamic cellular processes in biology, and plays vital roles in understanding of functions of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and design of ESC-based therapy. Conventional assays and fluorescence-based imaging methods have been widely used for the study of embryonic development. These conventional methods cannot effectively provide spatial and temporal resolutions with sufficient sensitivity and selectivity that are required to depict embryonic development in vivo in real-time at single-cell and single-molecule resolutions. In this dissertation, we have developed a wide range of innovative tools for real-time study of embryonic development. These new tools ...


Alginate Lyase Exhibits Catalysis-Independent Biofilm Dispersion And Antibiotic Synergy, John W. Lamppa, Karl E. Griswold Jan 2013

Alginate Lyase Exhibits Catalysis-Independent Biofilm Dispersion And Antibiotic Synergy, John W. Lamppa, Karl E. Griswold

Open Dartmouth: Peer-reviewed articles by Dartmouth faculty

More than 2 decades of study support the hypothesis that alginate lyases are promising therapeutic candidates for treating mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. In particular, the enzymes' ability to degrade alginate, a key component of mucoid biofilm matrix, has been the presumed mechanism by which they disrupt biofilms and enhance antibiotic efficacy. The systematic studies reported here show that, in an in vitro model, alginate lyase dispersion of P. aeruginosa biofilms and enzyme synergy