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Full-Text Articles in Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

Lafora Disease E3-Ubiquitin Ligase Malin Is Related To Trim32 At Both The Phylogenetic And Functional Level, Carlos Romá-Mateo, Daniel Moreno, Santiago Vernia, Teresa Rubio, Travis M. Bridges, Matthew S. Gentry, Pascual Sanz Jul 2011

Lafora Disease E3-Ubiquitin Ligase Malin Is Related To Trim32 At Both The Phylogenetic And Functional Level, Carlos Romá-Mateo, Daniel Moreno, Santiago Vernia, Teresa Rubio, Travis M. Bridges, Matthew S. Gentry, Pascual Sanz

Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry Faculty Publications

BACKGROUND: Malin is an E3-ubiquitin ligase that is mutated in Lafora disease, a fatal form of progressive myoclonus epilepsy. In order to perform its function, malin forms a functional complex with laforin, a glucan phosphatase that facilitates targeting of malin to its corresponding substrates. While laforin phylogeny has been studied, there are no data on the evolutionary lineage of malin.

RESULTS: After an extensive search for malin orthologs, we found that malin is present in all vertebrate species and a cephalochordate, in contrast with the broader species distribution previously reported for laforin. These data suggest that in addition to forming ...


Identification Of The Allosteric Regulatory Site Of Insulysin, Nicholas Noinaj, Sonia K. Bhasin, Eun Suk Song, Kirsten E. Scoggin, Maria A. Juliano, Luiz Juliano, Louis B. Hersh, David W. Rodgers Jun 2011

Identification Of The Allosteric Regulatory Site Of Insulysin, Nicholas Noinaj, Sonia K. Bhasin, Eun Suk Song, Kirsten E. Scoggin, Maria A. Juliano, Luiz Juliano, Louis B. Hersh, David W. Rodgers

Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry Faculty Publications

BACKGROUND: Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the Aβ peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP.

PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates ...


Direct Cloning Of Double-Stranded Rnas From Rnase Protection Analysis Reveals Processing Patterns Of C/D Box Snornas And Provides Evidence For Widespread Antisense Transcript Expression, Manli Shen, Eduardo Eyras, Jie Wu, Amit Khanna, Serene Josiah, Mathieu Rederstorff, Michael Q. Zhang, Stefan Stamm Jan 2011

Direct Cloning Of Double-Stranded Rnas From Rnase Protection Analysis Reveals Processing Patterns Of C/D Box Snornas And Provides Evidence For Widespread Antisense Transcript Expression, Manli Shen, Eduardo Eyras, Jie Wu, Amit Khanna, Serene Josiah, Mathieu Rederstorff, Michael Q. Zhang, Stefan Stamm

Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry Faculty Publications

We describe a new method that allows cloning of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) that are generated in RNase protection experiments. We demonstrate that the mouse C/D box snoRNA MBII-85 (SNORD116) is processed into at least five shorter RNAs using processing sites near known functional elements of C/D box snoRNAs. Surprisingly, the majority of cloned RNAs from RNase protection experiments were derived from endogenous cellular RNA, indicating widespread antisense expression. The cloned dsRNAs could be mapped to genome areas that show RNA expression on both DNA strands and partially overlapped with experimentally determined argonaute-binding sites. The data suggest a conserved ...


Converting A Protein Into A Switch For Biosensing And Functional Regulation, Margaret M. Stratton, S N. Loh Jan 2011

Converting A Protein Into A Switch For Biosensing And Functional Regulation, Margaret M. Stratton, S N. Loh

Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Department Faculty Publication Series

Proteins that switch conformations in response to a signaling event (e.g., ligand binding or chemical modification) present a unique solution to the design of reagent-free biosensors as well as molecules whose biological functions are regulated in useful ways. The principal roadblock in the path to develop such molecules is that the majority of natural proteins do not change conformation upon binding their cognate ligands or becoming chemically modified. Herein, we review recent protein engineering efforts to introduce switching properties into binding proteins. By co-opting natural allosteric coupling, joining proteins in creative ways and formulating altogether new switching mechanisms, researchers ...