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Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology Commons

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Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

2014

Cilia

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Full-Text Articles in Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

Fap206 Is A Microtubule-Docking Adapter For Ciliary Radial Spoke 2 And Dynein C, Krishna K. Vasudevan, Kangkang Song, Lea M. Alford, Winfield Sale, Erin E. Dymek, Elizabeth F. Smith, Todd Hennessey, Ewa Joachimiak, Paulina Urbanska, Dorota Wloga, William Dentler, Daniela Nicastro, Jacek Gaertig Dec 2014

Fap206 Is A Microtubule-Docking Adapter For Ciliary Radial Spoke 2 And Dynein C, Krishna K. Vasudevan, Kangkang Song, Lea M. Alford, Winfield Sale, Erin E. Dymek, Elizabeth F. Smith, Todd Hennessey, Ewa Joachimiak, Paulina Urbanska, Dorota Wloga, William Dentler, Daniela Nicastro, Jacek Gaertig

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

Radial spokes are conserved macromolecular complexes that are essential for ciliary motility. A triplet of three radial spokes, RS1, RS2, and RS3, repeats every 96 nm along the doublet microtubules. Each spoke has a distinct base that docks to the doublet and is linked to different inner dynein arms. Little is known about the assembly and functions of individual radial spokes. A knockout of the conserved ciliary protein FAP206 in the ciliate Tetrahymena resulted in slow cell motility. Cryo–electron tomography showed that in the absence of FAP206, the 96-nm repeats lacked RS2 and dynein c. Occasionally, RS2 assembled but ...