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Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology Commons

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Chemistry Faculty Publications

Fordham University

1964

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

Quantitative Aspects Of Co2 Fixation In Mammalian Brain In Vivo / H. Waelsch, S. Berl, C.A. Rossi, D. D. Clarke, And D. P. Purpura New York State Psychiatric Institute And Departments Of Biochemistry And Neurological Surgery, College Of Physicians And Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, N.Y., Heinrich Waelsch, Soll Berl, C. A. Rossi, Donald Dudley Clarke Phd Jan 1964

Quantitative Aspects Of Co2 Fixation In Mammalian Brain In Vivo / H. Waelsch, S. Berl, C.A. Rossi, D. D. Clarke, And D. P. Purpura New York State Psychiatric Institute And Departments Of Biochemistry And Neurological Surgery, College Of Physicians And Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, N.Y., Heinrich Waelsch, Soll Berl, C. A. Rossi, Donald Dudley Clarke Phd

Chemistry Faculty Publications

The rate of fixation of carbon dioxide in vivo into aspartate, glutamate, oxoglutarate, and glutamine of cerebral cortex and liver in the absence and presence of elevated concentrations of tissue ammonia was studied. The specific activities of the isolated metabolites were related to the specific activity of the tissue CO2. It was attempted to obtain an approximate steady state level of tissue 14CO2 by maintaining a constant isotope concentration in the venous and arterial blood through continuous intravenous administration of NaH14CO3. 1. In the absence of ammonia, aspartic acid achieved the highest specific activity in both brain and liver; the ...


Acid Hydrolysis Of 3-Phenylsydnone-2-N15 / Joanne Staley And Donald D. Clarke Chemistry Department, Fordham University, Bronx, New York, Joanne Staley, Donald Dudley Clarke Phd Jan 1964

Acid Hydrolysis Of 3-Phenylsydnone-2-N15 / Joanne Staley And Donald D. Clarke Chemistry Department, Fordham University, Bronx, New York, Joanne Staley, Donald Dudley Clarke Phd

Chemistry Faculty Publications

When N -phenylsydnone is hydrolyzed by acid, an internal oxidation- reduction reaction takes place with the formation of phenylhydrazine, formic acid, and carbon dioxide. The mechanism shown below was suggested for this reaction by Baker and Ollis. Aside from the nature of the end products of this hydrolysis, the strongest evidence cited by Baker and Ollis in support of their mechanism is the paper by Kenner and Mackay who reported the isolation of a-acylhydrazines when the hydrolysis was carried out in benzene with stoichiometric quantities of water and hydrochloric acid. However, Kenner and Mackay gave no experimental evidence to support ...