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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

Photocatalytic Reduction Of Fumarate To Succinate On Zns Mineral Surfaces, Ruixin Zhou, Marcelo I. Guzman Apr 2016

Photocatalytic Reduction Of Fumarate To Succinate On Zns Mineral Surfaces, Ruixin Zhou, Marcelo I. Guzman

Chemistry Faculty Publications

The reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle is an important central biosynthetic pathway that fixes CO2 into carboxylic acids. Among the five reductive steps in the rTCA cycle, the two-electron reduction of fumarate to succinate proceeds nonenzymatically on the surface of photoexcited sphalerite (ZnS) colloids suspended in water. This model reaction is chosen to systematically study the surface photoprocess occurring on ZnS in the presence of [Na2S] (1–10 mM) hole scavenger at 15 °C. Experiments at variable pH (5–10) indicate that monodissociated fumaric acid is the primary electron acceptor forming the monoprotic form of succinic acid ...


Metabolomics Reveals New Mechanisms For Pathogenesis In Barth Syndrome And Introduces Novel Roles For Cardiolipin In Cellular Function, Yana Sandlers, Kelly Mercier, Wimal Pathmasiri, Jim Carlson, Susan Mcritchie, Susan Sumner, Hilary J. Vernon Mar 2016

Metabolomics Reveals New Mechanisms For Pathogenesis In Barth Syndrome And Introduces Novel Roles For Cardiolipin In Cellular Function, Yana Sandlers, Kelly Mercier, Wimal Pathmasiri, Jim Carlson, Susan Mcritchie, Susan Sumner, Hilary J. Vernon

Chemistry Faculty Publications

Barth Syndrome is the only known Mendelian disorder of cardiolipin remodeling, with characteristic clinical features of cardiomyopathy, skeletal myopathy, and neutropenia. While the primary biochemical defects of reduced mature cardiolipin and increased monolysocardiolipin are well-described, much of the downstream biochemical dysregulation has not been uncovered, and biomarkers are limited. In order to further expand upon the knowledge of the biochemical abnormalities in Barth Syndrome, we analyzed metabolite profiles in plasma from a cohort of individuals with Barth Syndrome compared to age-matched controls via 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A clear distinction between metabolite profiles of ...


The Dual Regulatory Role Of Amino Acids Leu480 And Gln481 Of Prothrombin, Joesph R. Wiencek, Jamila Hirbawi, Vivien C. Yee, Michael Kalafatis Jan 2016

The Dual Regulatory Role Of Amino Acids Leu480 And Gln481 Of Prothrombin, Joesph R. Wiencek, Jamila Hirbawi, Vivien C. Yee, Michael Kalafatis

Chemistry Faculty Publications

Prothrombin (FII) is activated to α-thrombin (IIa) by prothrombinase. Prothrombinase is composed of a catalytic subunit, factor Xa (fXa), and a regulatory subunit, factor Va (fVa), assembled on a membrane surface in the presence of divalent metal ions. We constructed, expressed, and purified several mutated recombinant FII (rFII) molecules within the previously determined fVa-dependent binding site for fXa (amino acid region 473–487 of FII). rFII molecules bearing overlapping deletions within this significant region first established the minimal stretch of amino acids required for the fVa-dependent recognition exosite for fXa in prothrombinase within the amino acid sequence Ser478–Val ...


It Is All About (U)Biquitin: Role Of Altered Ubiquitin-Proteasome System And Uchl1 In Alzheimer Disease, Antonella Tramutola, Fabio Di Domenico, Eugenio Barone, Marzia Perluigi, D. Allan Butterfield Jan 2016

It Is All About (U)Biquitin: Role Of Altered Ubiquitin-Proteasome System And Uchl1 In Alzheimer Disease, Antonella Tramutola, Fabio Di Domenico, Eugenio Barone, Marzia Perluigi, D. Allan Butterfield

Chemistry Faculty Publications

Free radical-mediated damage to macromolecules and the resulting oxidative modification of different cellular components are a common feature of aging, and this process becomes much more pronounced in age-associated pathologies, including Alzheimer disease (AD). In particular, proteins are particularly sensitive to oxidative stress-induced damage and these irreversible modifications lead to the alteration of protein structure and function. In order to maintain cell homeostasis, these oxidized/damaged proteins have to be removed in order to prevent their toxic accumulation. It is generally accepted that the age-related accumulation of “aberrant” proteins results from both the increased occurrence of damage and the decreased ...